U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-23-2009, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Greeley, Colorado
631 posts, read 1,395,403 times
Reputation: 162

Advertisements

Seems to me like Wyoming, Montana, or even both Dakotas would have something like that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-23-2009, 08:17 PM
 
6,046 posts, read 10,056,780 times
Reputation: 2334
A road is not a town. Just because a place has a road nearby doesn't mean it is near a town
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-24-2009, 08:14 AM
 
4,925 posts, read 9,786,207 times
Reputation: 3268
Here's a link to a map of the Inventoried Roadless Areas on National Forest Service Land.

http://www.trcp.org/documents/NatlIRAMap.pdf

Looks like some areas in Idaho would be more than 20 miles...

However, keep in mind this is only Forest Service Land. It doesn't take into account BLM, Park Service, other federally held land and privately owned land...so there will be some more.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-24-2009, 08:48 AM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
13,856 posts, read 22,982,118 times
Reputation: 6688
Adak, Alaska looks quite remote as it's on an island in the Aleutians. Of larger Alaska towns Nome and Unalaska look fairly isolated. Fairbanks is somewhat isolated from any large town by the looks of it.

In the contiguous US Valentine, Nebraska and Lusk, Wyoming are fairly remote. They don't seem to be "fifty miles to the nearest town" remote though as if you count them as towns than nearby towns of a couple hundred also count.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-24-2009, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Grand Rapids, MN
571 posts, read 2,295,555 times
Reputation: 310
Some interesting responses, thanks. I've always been curious about the "blank" spots on the map!

Interesting about no point in the continental US being more than 20 miles from a road. They never really defined their criteria for "road" though. (I.e., does it have to be a currently maintained road that an average passenger car could reasonably navigate? Or do things like old overgrown logging roads or mountain jeep trails count?)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-24-2009, 12:07 PM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,157,976 times
Reputation: 10910
There are many places like that here out West. Even here in CA. We talk in terms of hours instead of miles.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-24-2009, 12:09 PM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,157,976 times
Reputation: 10910
Quote:
Originally Posted by city_data91 View Post
A road is not a town. Just because a place has a road nearby doesn't mean it is near a town
Yep. I think equating roads with development is an Eastern thing.

Here, you can drive, and drive, and drive, and all you see is road but no businesses or other non rural development.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-24-2009, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,238 posts, read 24,450,303 times
Reputation: 13010
Methinks the OP should take a drive through the Mojave Desert. US-395, I-40, CA-178, CA-190 come to mind.

I-25 in Wyoming between Casper and Buffalo too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-24-2009, 04:25 PM
 
Location: Grand Rapids, MN
571 posts, read 2,295,555 times
Reputation: 310
I have actually driven in some VERY remote places (up to Alaska twice plus every state west of the Mississippi), so I'm quite familiar with empty highways. I can recall one place in Utah where it was about 100 miles between services. So yes, on any single road it's not unheard of for there to be 50 or more miles between towns...but I'm wondering if there's a town (in the lower 48) that has no other town in ANY DIRECTION for at least 50 miles.

Of course defining "town" can get tricky. As others have mentioned, there are dots on the map that in reality are no more than ghost towns--i.e., old railroad stops that retain their place names even though it's quite possible there's only one or two houses left, if any. Or as another poster mentioned, just a post office in the middle of nowhere to serve as an address for rural farming/ranching areas.

I guess I would define "town" as a place inhabited by more than one family that offers some sort of businesses or services. This definition would eliminate villages (i.e., a handful of houses but no businesses) and "outposts" (roadhouses, solitary gas stations, etc.)

With that said, does anyone have any examples?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-25-2009, 01:35 AM
 
Location: Southwest Washington
2,317 posts, read 6,891,186 times
Reputation: 1701
Quote:
Originally Posted by MidniteBreeze View Post
I have actually driven in some VERY remote places (up to Alaska twice plus every state west of the Mississippi), so I'm quite familiar with empty highways. I can recall one place in Utah where it was about 100 miles between services. So yes, on any single road it's not unheard of for there to be 50 or more miles between towns...but I'm wondering if there's a town (in the lower 48) that has no other town in ANY DIRECTION for at least 50 miles.

Of course defining "town" can get tricky. As others have mentioned, there are dots on the map that in reality are no more than ghost towns--i.e., old railroad stops that retain their place names even though it's quite possible there's only one or two houses left, if any. Or as another poster mentioned, just a post office in the middle of nowhere to serve as an address for rural farming/ranching areas.

I guess I would define "town" as a place inhabited by more than one family that offers some sort of businesses or services. This definition would eliminate villages (i.e., a handful of houses but no businesses) and "outposts" (roadhouses, solitary gas stations, etc.)

With that said, does anyone have any examples?
Lakeview, Oregon. 53.7 miles to the next nearest town (Alturas, California). It's called Oregon's Outback for a reason. There's just empty desert for miles. Some roads in Eastern Oregon warn you to carry gas with you because there won't be any services for long enough that you could run out of gas...

EDIT: I lied on accident. According to Google Maps, Paisley, Oregon (pop. ~240) is ~45.1 miles from Lakeview.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top