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Old 04-16-2010, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Phoenix
5,642 posts, read 7,444,233 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MidniteBreeze View Post
Denio, Nevada - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I think Denio may be as close as we're going to get...though technically there are actually two communities 2 miles apart (Denio and Denio junction). According to the article above, Denio has a bar, community center and a library, so it meets my definition of a town. Denio Junction (2 miles to the south) has gas, food and lodging.
I'm not sure if you want to qualify Fields, OR as a town (it has a cafe, store, gas station, RV park, hotel/motel, post office, a few homes), but it is actually located only 21.1 miles from Denio.

Fields Oregon (http://fieldsoregon.com/default.aspx - broken link)
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Old 04-17-2010, 07:37 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AZLiam View Post
I'm not sure if you want to qualify Fields, OR as a town (it has a cafe, store, gas station, RV park, hotel/motel, post office, a few homes), but it is actually located only 21.1 miles from Denio.

Fields Oregon (http://fieldsoregon.com/default.aspx - broken link)
I've been there...great malts at the cafe, especially when you've been in the field for a week or two.

It is what passes as a good sized town in that area. If it has services...it's a town.
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Old 04-17-2010, 04:15 PM
 
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I believe there are some areas in the Adirondacks in Upstate NY like this, but I'm not totally sure about that.
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Old 04-17-2010, 04:51 PM
 
924 posts, read 1,388,570 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MidniteBreeze View Post
I just watched the movie Poplulation 436 last night. It's about an isolated Midwestern town called Rockwell Falls (presumably in Illinois, but they don't really say), whose population has stayed the same for over 100 years. A census taker comes to town and is warned by a local that he should immediately return to the last town, which is 50 miles back.

Even if we buy the premise that Rockwell Falls is located at the end of the ONLY road leading there, it's hard for me to believe that ANY town in Illinois could be the only populated place for 50 road miles. I live in northern Minnesota (which has some pretty remote areas) and I can't think of a town that is the ONLY thing for 50 miles. 30 maybe, but not 50.

That got me thinking...is there ANY town in the USA that is 50 or more miles by road, in any direction, from any other town? (This of course excludes Alaskan villages or island settlements, etc. that can only be flow or boated to.)

I Googled "most isolated town in america" but didn't really get the answer I was looking for. I also took a quick look at Google maps at some sparsely populated areas. Even Eureka, NV (located on the "loneliest road in America") is within 40 miles of places called Alpha (to the north on hwy 278) and Bull Fork (to the south on hwy 379). If Alpha and Bull Fork are actually "towns", I don't know...but somehow they earned a name and a dot on the map.

So, does such a place exist in the USA? Thanks for any help you can give to satisfy my geeky curiosity
You answered your own question apparently.

According to Wikipedia, the closest town to Eureka is 59 miles away, Duckwater.
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Old 04-17-2010, 05:33 PM
 
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I found a couple more for fun to:

Round Mountain, Nevada (58 miles to Tonopah, Nevada)
Van Horn, Texas (69 miles from Pecos, Texas)
Yuma, Arizona (55 miles from Calexico, California)
Alturas, California (51 miles from Lakeview, Oregon)
Burns, Oregon (102 miles from Canyon City, Oregon)

I'm sure there's more. Just find a map and go to this website and play around with places: City Distance Tool - Find the distance between 2 cities
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Old 04-17-2010, 05:51 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 6,036,813 times
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Wink 50 miles distant

Try Halls Crossing, UT, with a population of 89 in the 2000 census. But it only counts as isolated if including its twin sister and marina on the far side of Lake Powell, Bullfrog, which also has residences. Bullfrog also has what may be the only hotel in the area: Defiance House Lodge. The only paved road access to these sister towns is via UT 276, with a ferry between the two. If in the middle of nowhere, these two marinas would see a fair amount of tourism in the summer season, with Lake Powell acting as a road of sorts as well.

If these two surely 50 road miles from any other town, I'll define this more conservatively: as the crow flies. In that regard they may or not be. A place such as Eggnog, to the northwest, probably doesn't have any residents, or at least not a town per se. I'll define a town as a place with at least one full time resident, with some type of formal service, whether petrol, food, lodging, or post office. Clay Hills Crossing, to the southeast, possibly has a few residents, but the only service may be the ford of the San Juan river. Rainbow City, more or less due south, probably has a few residents, but unlikely any services. The most likely 'towns' would be along UT 95, with Fry Canyon a vague possibility. Natural Bridges National Monument likely has a ranger in attendance, with a visitor's center, but no other services. The Cal Black Memorial Airport, east of Halls Crossing, likely only offers aircraft services, such as petrol, but probably no residents.

The only towns of any substance in the region, such as Mexican Hat to the southeast, Page, AZ to the south, or Boulder or Escalante to the northwest, are well beyond 50 miles.

50 miles to the closet town? This poses an interesting question, and quandary. Alaska is the obvious choice, or some small island in the South Pacific, but within the lower 48 of America it seems near impossible. If still lots of open space in this country, it is all fairly well subdivided. Even true wilderness exists only as only small islands. One example would be Olympic National Park on Washington's Olympic peninsula, with any road only just within its periphery, then only hiking trails.

The Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness of central Idaho comprises 1,340,502 acres, 1,089,059 within Idaho and 251,443 of it in Montana. To the south, separated by the The Magruder Corridor, lies the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness. The Moose Creek Ranger District (560,000 roadless acres) lies within the Selway-Bitterroot, the only district of the Forest Service entirely within a Wilderness. So this area would qualify, save the lack of towns within. Stanley, ID lies at the southern edge of this wilderness area, but if remote is still within 50 miles of another town.

The small motel/casino, The Border Inn (NV), at the border of Utah and Nevada on US 50 qualifies as being in the middle of nowhere. It is well over 50 miles from Delta, UT to the east, and about that from Ely, NV to the west. But it is also part of the metro area comprised of Baker, NV, Eskdale, UT, and Great Basin National Park.

Due north, Wendover, NV comes fairly close. The only towns of any substance, Wells, NV to the west, or Salt Lake City, UT to the east. But technically it is disqualified due some smaller (much smaller) towns within 50 miles.

Eureka and Austin, NV should get honorable mention, Ely, NV as well. Technically they probably all get disqualified, but maybe not as none of the other 'towns' in the area may offer services. If traveling on US 50 they are about the only places offering services between Delta, UT and Fallen, NV. There is the NV/UT border, as mentioned, then one or two places between Austin and Fallen which may have petrol, such as Cold Springs. Anyplace else is going to be sketchy.

Gerlach, NV in the Black Rock Desert, perhaps best known for The Burning Man festival, may qualify. Fairly remote, but the Paiute tribe at Pyramid lake may disqualify it.

Lakeview, OR is a good choice, but technically disqualified. The intersection north of there at Valley Falls was fairly well deserted, but to the south New Pine Creek, OR or Davis Creek, CA offer services. In general, though, southeast Oregon is a good bet.

Stehekin, WA fails technically as well, but otherwise a good definition of remote. There isn't even a road connecting it to anything; access is via ferry from Chelan at the south end of Chelan lake, the largest natural lake in Washington state.

Among other possibilities, one could mention Pahaska, WY on US 14, east of Yellowstone National Park. More than 50 miles from Cody, WY to the east, but within 50 miles of Yellowstone Lodge within the Park. Otherwise kind of in the middle of nowhere, or everywhere (depending on the subjective criteria).

In looking it becomes apparent how developed this nation has become since the exploration of Lewis and Clark in 1803. They only occasionally met various indian tribes on their travels, each with specific villages, if claims to vast expanses of virgin territory. Now, whether town or no, it would be a challenge to find oneself 50 miles distant from the nearest homo sapien, let alone some type of road.

Crowded?
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Old 04-18-2010, 06:09 AM
 
4,925 posts, read 9,775,603 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Llewelyn View Post
I found a couple more for fun to:

Round Mountain, Nevada (58 miles to Tonopah, Nevada)
Van Horn, Texas (69 miles from Pecos, Texas)
Yuma, Arizona (55 miles from Calexico, California)
Alturas, California (51 miles from Lakeview, Oregon)
Burns, Oregon (102 miles from Canyon City, Oregon)

I'm sure there's more. Just find a map and go to this website and play around with places: City Distance Tool - Find the distance between 2 cities
Burns is the town folks in Frenchglen, Denio that we have been discussing go to--it has TWO grocery stores! Canyon City may as well be John Day, OR as they run together--both small isolated towns.
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Old 08-26-2010, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Seattle, Washington
3,733 posts, read 6,476,276 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Idunn View Post
Stehekin, WA fails technically as well, but otherwise a good definition of remote. There isn't even a road connecting it to anything; access is via ferry from Chelan at the south end of Chelan lake, the largest natural lake in Washington state.
Agreed. Lake Chelan is approximately 55 miles long. Chelan is located on the south end, and Stehekin on the north end. That's a 55 mile long ferry ride and takes anywhere from 2.5 to 4 hours one way (depending on other stops along the way). I would call that pretty remote. Aside from personal boat on the lake or by small plane, there is no other way to access Stehekin. (Note that there are a couple of other small communities up and down the lake shore too, also only accessible by the ferry from Chelan, but I don't think those count here).
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Old 08-26-2010, 07:17 PM
 
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I bet a good runner could get from Hwy 20 to Stehikin on the PCT quicker than the rest of us leaving from the same trailhead and going by way of car and boat.
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Old 08-26-2010, 10:57 PM
 
Location: South Chicagoland
4,111 posts, read 7,630,662 times
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I saw that movie a few months ago and although the census taker was from Chicago, I don't recall Rockwell Falls being a town in IL. When did the movie specify that it was?

There was a scene where the census taker was telling his love interest about the weather in Chicago (and how there's apparently only 3 seasons). This wouldn't make much sense if Rockwell Falls was in IL because the weather wouldn't be different enough.
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