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View Poll Results: What is the best?
Wisconsin 36 46.15%
Minnesota 42 53.85%
Voters: 78. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-31-2011, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Cleveland bound with MPLS in the rear-view
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matchek91 View Post
I would have to pick Wisconsin and here's why: I have lived in south-central Wisconsin since 1999 and travel to Minnesota at least 2-3 times every year to see family. Both states have their pros/cons but Wisconsin has far more pros than Minnesota.

1.) Wisconsin has far more spread-out medium sized cities than Minnesota: Madison, Green Bay, Appleton, Wausau, La Crosse, the Dells. Minnesota just has Rochester and Duluth; and Duluth is a whopping 3-hour drive north of the Cities You forgot St. Cloud, which also has about 200K in the small metro area. St. Cloud and Rochester are both 1.0-1.5 hours away from the Twin Cities...

2.) There is simply more to do in Wisconsin and it's this reason why we're one of the most heavily-visited states in the country each year: Door County, miles of beaches on Lake Michigan, Milwaukee: the City of Festivals and home to the world's largest music festival - Summerfest, 3 professional sporting franchises and one of the best college football and basketball teams in the country - the Badgers, THE WISCONSIN DELLS - The Waterpark Capital of the World, Up North Wisconsin - land of over 15,000 lakes, The House on the Rock, dozens of breweries and micro-breweries, and MUCH much more! There is literally almost NOTHING you have mentioned that MN does not have, except specific venues, but MN has events and recreation like the ones you have mentioned.

3.) Both states have their unique look, but Wisconsin is more beautiful - we have more rolling hills, Lake Michigan, and a beautiful north woods (although Minnesota's doesn't get run over by Illinois bastards each year)
We have all of that, in ADDITION to rolling plains in the SW part of the state. MN has bigger hills up north than WI, like Eagle Mountain. MN is essentially WI geographically except it adds the plains in the SW. MN has a larger land area than WI, don't forget.

4.) Minneapolis is too far away from everything. Milwaukee is only an hour drive to Chicago. Also, don't underestimate Milwaukee. I personally like Minneapolis better but Milwaukee has a few things Minneapolis doesn't: a world-renowned art museum, a beautiful, easily accessible lake front with recreational beaches, more historical charm, and more micro-breweries!
Minneapolis has art museums and lakes. It has more lakes (smaller, obviously) and better art museums. I can't deny Milwaukee's history or its bars/breweries though. And since when is the big perk of where you live being right next to a better city? Chicago isn't that far from Minneapolis if you need to visit frequently: most of my family lives there and I travel through WI all the time over the weekend -- it's easy! BECAUSE of its relative isolation, Minneapolis has been able to prosper on its own and outside the shadows of Chicago.

5.) No offense Minnesota, but Wisconsin just kicks your butt in football - America's favorite sport. The Packers have the most championships of any team, the largest fan-base but yet they're in the smallest city, and the team doesn't have a single owner... they're owned by the fans. Moreover, when is the last time the Gophers beat the Badgers? Yes, the fudge-Packers win a lot, much the chagrin of most Bears/Vikings fans, but unlike WI, MN doesn't wake up each day to worship the Vikings like Packer fans do for their team. I mean, cancelling school on Mondays just to watch the game? Now THAT is "hick" and provincial! And you have a public team because the NFL allotted you that special waiver, no other team can do this and it's not because they don't want to. The Vikings have the 6th best/biggest fanbase, which isn't shabby considering that the team is half as old as the Packers.

6.) Both states are quite "hick", but Wisconsin is the lesser of the two.
What kind of subjective b.s. is this?! How do you measure "hick"? If anything, both states are, on average, highly educated and progressive -- the opposite of hick. I'd say on a resident-to-resident basis, WI is much more "hick" than MN, mainly because most of WI's populaton is outside its main city, unlike MN and the Twin Cities, which comprise over 60% of the state's population.

Here are a few reasons why Minnesota has the edge on Wisconsin: better-looking women, a beautiful city (Minneapolis, which, by the way, has beautiful suburbs - Eden Prairie, Wayzata, Apple Valley, etc.), an awesome NHL team, and a much more pristine, tamer, north woods.
MN has a lot more on WI than just that, but it's not a bad start. I sense a ton of subjectivism and bias in your assessment, and can't take it too seriously from an objective standpoint. Your state pride is strong, and that says a lot about the people in your state. I pesonally think WI is more "pretty" than MN mile for mile, but MN has just about everything WI has geographically and in some cases a little bit more (plains). The lakes are damn near equal (14K to 15K is close, and I know WI measures lakes on a smaller scale than MN, so that comparison isn't apples-to-apples in the 1st place). I envy WI's attitude towards beer/brats/grilling, and its laid back nature in general. The proximity to Chicago AND the Twin Cities is a pretty sweet deal, but I'm not sure I'd live in Milwaukee over either of those two cities in most instances, and if I don't live in Milwaukee or Madison, chances are I'm not living in WI any time soon.
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Old 12-31-2011, 11:53 AM
 
Location: MN
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West, I would agree with you on almost all of your points. Milwaukee is great because of it's proximity to Madison, The Twin Cities and Chicago... Parts of WI are flat as a pancake and some parts have huge rolling mound-like hills. The long lakeshore is a great advantage as well.

With all that said. Both states are very similar. I would say MN has a more diverse geography, and the Twin Cities cannot be rivaled to anywhere in WI.
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Old 12-31-2011, 12:17 PM
 
Location: MN
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http://dnr.wi.gov/landscapes/images/ecol_map.gif (broken link)

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Old 12-31-2011, 12:27 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
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Tie!
Love em both, lets be happy these two great states are right next to each other

Minnesota gets some pointer with one dominate metro region though
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Old 12-31-2011, 08:30 PM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knke0204 View Post
I prefer the Northern Highland region of Wisconsin, geologically part of the Canadian Shield. It has a similar feel in terms of landscape to the UP of Michigan, but with an even higher concentration of lakes. The "highland" quotient refers to the slight increase in elevation to around 1600-1700ft elevation, so the climate is colder given the latitude of the area. The Iron Belt lies along and just to the northwest of the Northern Highland defined area and includes Iron County and a portion of Ashland County. That was the southwest extent of the mining belt that was booming at the turn of the 20th century and extended northeast along Lake Superior. This is also a Lake Effect area that receives snows of Lake Superior. The southeast extent of the Lake Effect goes over to Eagle River.
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Old 12-31-2011, 10:53 PM
 
Location: Cleveland bound with MPLS in the rear-view
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
I prefer the Northern Highland region of Wisconsin, geologically part of the Canadian Shield. It has a similar feel in terms of landscape to the UP of Michigan, but with an even higher concentration of lakes. The "highland" quotient refers to the slight increase in elevation to around 1600-1700ft elevation, so the climate is colder given the latitude of the area. The Iron Belt lies along and just to the northwest of the Northern Highland defined area and includes Iron County and a portion of Ashland County. That was the southwest extent of the mining belt that was booming at the turn of the 20th century and extended northeast along Lake Superior. This is also a Lake Effect area that receives snows of Lake Superior. The southeast extent of the Lake Effect goes over to Eagle River.
I would be willing to bet that MN has FAR more iron ore than WI, but please prove me wrong. The Mesabi Range is where iron ore reigns!
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Old 01-01-2012, 09:20 AM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by west336 View Post
I would be willing to bet that MN has FAR more iron ore than WI, but please prove me wrong. The Mesabi Range is where iron ore reigns!
That is likely the case. I wasn't referring to mining in the Iron Range of MN in my prior post. If you research the mining boom in the UP it also extended south to the Iron Belt of WI.
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Old 01-01-2012, 11:26 AM
 
Location: MN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
I prefer the Northern Highland region of Wisconsin, geologically part of the Canadian Shield. It has a similar feel in terms of landscape to the UP of Michigan, but with an even higher concentration of lakes. The "highland" quotient refers to the slight increase in elevation to around 1600-1700ft elevation, so the climate is colder given the latitude of the area. The Iron Belt lies along and just to the northwest of the Northern Highland defined area and includes Iron County and a portion of Ashland County. That was the southwest extent of the mining belt that was booming at the turn of the 20th century and extended northeast along Lake Superior. This is also a Lake Effect area that receives snows of Lake Superior. The southeast extent of the Lake Effect goes over to Eagle River.
Nice Post.

It's very interesting. Excuse my ignorance, but before I drove from Duluth to Chicago, I never realized the geography of Wisconsin. As a Native Minnesotan, I just assumed Wisconsin looked pretty much like Minnesota. I have driven from the Twin Cities to Chicago before, but it's usually me leaving early in the AM when it's dark or late at night. I have never realized how hilly Wisconsin is on that drive. Those tall mound-like bluffs are really cool
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Old 01-01-2012, 12:07 PM
 
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I might prefer Wisconsin over my home state of Minnesota, or the other way around.

WI is older, good and bad at the same time.
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Old 01-01-2012, 12:35 PM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knke0204 View Post
Nice Post.

It's very interesting. Excuse my ignorance, but before I drove from Duluth to Chicago, I never realized the geography of Wisconsin. As a Native Minnesotan, I just assumed Wisconsin looked pretty much like Minnesota. I have driven from the Twin Cities to Chicago before, but it's usually me leaving early in the AM when it's dark or late at night. I have never realized how hilly Wisconsin is on that drive. Those tall mound-like bluffs are really cool
The mound like bluffs encompass the "Driftless Region," an area that was bypassed by the flattening during the last ice age. The Driftless Region is not part of the Canadian Shield geologically like the Northern Highland region of Vilas, Oneida, and Lincoln counties of northern Wisconsin, though.
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