U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-28-2009, 09:48 PM
 
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
5,847 posts, read 11,020,104 times
Reputation: 3829

Advertisements

and then there is Ohio, which I believe is more like a microcosm of the United States than any state in the union.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-29-2009, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Colorado
434 posts, read 1,012,625 times
Reputation: 271
Quote:
Originally Posted by DinsdalePirahna View Post
and then there is Ohio, which I believe is more like a microcosm of the United States than any state in the union.
I agree.

I grew up in Ohio; no more than 10 miles (as the crow flies) from Lake Erie. And honestly I have never felt or considered "my Ohio" to be a part of the Midwest (although I realize we are often considered Midwestern....and I like the Midwestern US, so I'm not trying to marginalize the Midwest).

I have always said I am from the "Great Lakes" region; Cleveland was the "big" city my family always identified with. Cleveland, Buffalo, Toledo, Detroit, Erie, etc. are cities I would group together in the Great Lakes category (obviously ). Columbus, Indianapolis, Cincinnati, Louisville, etc. are in a different region or category, in my opinion. But obviously all of the cities mentioned do have many likenesses and similarities.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-29-2009, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Maryland
4,265 posts, read 5,478,884 times
Reputation: 4594
Quote:
Originally Posted by DinsdalePirahna View Post
and then there is Ohio, which I believe is more like a microcosm of the United States than any state in the union.
Hmm, the AP rated Illinois as the best microcosm of the U.S., but I'm sure Ohio can't be that far behind:

Analysis ranks Illinois most average state
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-29-2009, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Colorado
434 posts, read 1,012,625 times
Reputation: 271
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maintainschaos View Post
Hmm, the AP rated Illinois as the best microcosm of the U.S., but I'm sure Ohio can't be that far behind:

Analysis ranks Illinois most average state

I can see where Illinois may be most "average", but Ohio appears to represent the most geographic regions/cultures in the county all within one state (East Coast, New England, Great Lakes, Appalachian, Southern, Midwestern, Northern, etc.)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-29-2009, 05:05 PM
 
767 posts, read 1,827,951 times
Reputation: 508
Quote:
Originally Posted by sandwalk View Post
I can see where Illinois may be most "average", but Ohio appears to represent the most geographic regions/cultures in the county all within one state (East Coast, New England, Great Lakes, Appalachian, Southern, Midwestern, Northern, etc.)
Illinois south of I-70 tends to be very southern (e.g., terrain, culture, dialects). It is very much like KY, TN, and southern MO, From I-70 up to about I-80, Illinois is very typical midwestern (much like Iowa, Northern MO, and Kansas). From I-80 north, Illionis is very much a northern state (more like WI and MI). Of course, Chicago is its own region and is extremely diverse with an international flavor (much like NYC, SF, and LA).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-06-2009, 04:23 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
18 posts, read 49,788 times
Reputation: 20
The the Midwest has a lot of variance in overall culture. Chicago is very fast paced, cosmopolitan, and diverse, most similar to eastern cities such as New York, Boston, and Philly. Minneapolis is a progressive, well educated, and outdoorsy, most similar to western cities such as Seattle, Denver, and Portland. Then there are cities like Indianapolis, Milwaukee, Columbus, Pittsburgh, and Kansas City that have done a good job of shedding their blue collar image to become more white collar cities with a blossoming cultural scene. Then you have the more stereotypical, midwestern cities such as Detroit, Cleveland, Cincinnati, and St. Louis that, although have some nice areas and quite a few cultural amenities, are struggling much more than the average city with crime and job growth. Then you have the poor, smaller midwestern hell-holds such as Gary, East St. Louis, Flint, Saginaw, Youngstown, and Canton that are quickly decaying, have no culture, and are riddled with poverty and crime. Then you have some great, smaller cities such as Des Moines, Madison, and Omaha that have a booming cultural scene and have some of the best economies in the country. Then you have all of the other small areas in between these throughout the Dakotas, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan, Indiana, and Ohio that are friendly and safe, but cultural wastelands.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-06-2009, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
4,028 posts, read 6,397,463 times
Reputation: 1305
Quote:
Originally Posted by jz1988 View Post
Then you have all of the other small areas in between these throughout the Dakotas, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan, Indiana, and Ohio that are friendly and safe, but cultural wastelands.
This is where you'd be wrong.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-06-2009, 08:28 PM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,048,152 times
Reputation: 3482
Quote:
Originally Posted by sandwalk View Post
I can see where Illinois may be most "average", but Ohio appears to represent the most geographic regions/cultures in the county all within one state (East Coast, New England, Great Lakes, Appalachian, Southern, Midwestern, Northern, etc.)
How does OH represent the East Coast and New England? (The other regions you listed I agree with.)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-06-2009, 08:35 PM
 
5,835 posts, read 10,784,577 times
Reputation: 4428
Quote:
Originally Posted by jz1988 View Post
The the Midwest has a lot of variance in overall culture. Chicago is very fast paced, cosmopolitan, and diverse, most similar to eastern cities such as New York, Boston, and Philly. Minneapolis is a progressive, well educated, and outdoorsy, most similar to western cities such as Seattle, Denver, and Portland. Then there are cities like Indianapolis, Milwaukee, Columbus, Pittsburgh, and Kansas City that have done a good job of shedding their blue collar image to become more white collar cities with a blossoming cultural scene. Then you have the more stereotypical, midwestern cities such as Detroit, Cleveland, Cincinnati, and St. Louis that, although have some nice areas and quite a few cultural amenities, are struggling much more than the average city with crime and job growth. Then you have the poor, smaller midwestern hell-holds such as Gary, East St. Louis, Flint, Saginaw, Youngstown, and Canton that are quickly decaying, have no culture, and are riddled with poverty and crime. Then you have some great, smaller cities such as Des Moines, Madison, and Omaha that have a booming cultural scene and have some of the best economies in the country. Then you have all of the other small areas in between these throughout the Dakotas, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan, Indiana, and Ohio that are friendly and safe, but cultural wastelands.
The north side of Chicago is probably more like Toronto before the east coast cities. The south side is like Detroit (except in better shape simply because its part of Chicago).

The reason why I say this is a few things. Even in the dense, vibrant north side does not have row houses the way the east coast cities do. Instead both Toronto and the north side of Chicago are characterized mostly by individual houses on very small lots and 2 or 3 unit apartment buildings with high rises being mostly of more relatively recent construction. Whereas New York has had extremely tall skyscrapers and residential high rises since the 1920s. Chicago and a bit later Toronto didn't building theirs until the 60s.

Also, both Chicago and Toronto are capitals of regions that tend to get overlooked and are somewhat geographically isolated and also have small "rustbelt" cities very close by. Chicago doesn't have nearly the "old money" that the east coast does to. Many upper-middle class people in Chicago were blue-collared only a generation ago.

South side of Chicago has Detroit-like characteristics with crime, unemployment, and some urban decay as well as issues dealing with racial tensions. Chicagos south side has had MAJOR industrial plant closings over the last 30-40 years of which it has never fully rebounded from. But the south side does have the loop to commute to.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-06-2009, 08:37 PM
 
Location: Lower East Side, Milwaukee, WI
2,945 posts, read 4,148,950 times
Reputation: 1113
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
"What kind of culture do Midwest cities have?"

It really depends on whether or not you are referring to the Upper Midwest or Lower Midwest? The two subregions have very little in common at all.
I couldn't agree more. I think I hate the term "Midwest" more than anything in this world. There is no cohesive Midwest region like there is a New England or a Pacific Northwest or a Desert Southwest. There's the Great Lakes/Upper Midwest/East Central/Rust Belt region and there's the Great Plains/Lower Midwest/West Central/Farm Belt region. Call 'em whatever you like, just please don't ever lump them together like they're the same.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top