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Old 12-06-2009, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,520 posts, read 7,463,600 times
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Ohio does seem to have a split personality. When you get over to eastern Ohio, Clevland or Akron area for example it does start to get a very slight northeast feal to it. Dayton or Toledo are solid midwest as they are very close to solid midwest states like Indiana or Michigan. Cincinatti is alot midwest with a bit of southern influence. Overall its obviously mostly midwestern as a state, but it does take on the charactaristics of its neighbors to the east and the south the closer you get to those borders.
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Old 12-06-2009, 09:34 PM
 
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[quote=jz1988;11915570]The the Midwest has a lot of variance in overall culture. Chicago is very fast paced, cosmopolitan, and diverse, most similar to eastern cities such as New York, Boston, and Philly. Minneapolis is a progressive, well educated, and outdoorsy, most similar to western cities such as Seattle, Denver, and Portland. Then you have the more stereotypical, midwestern cities such as Detroit, Cleveland, Cincinnati, and St. Louis that, although have some nice areas and quite a few cultural amenities, are struggling much more than the average city with crime and job growth. QUOTE]

Up until the 70s/80s Chicago had more in common with Detroit (and the others than you think). Chicago was still pretty industrial, and its downtown was sort of desolate at night. Many people think that Chicago was going the same direction. SInce then Chicago has done lots to revitalize itself and its economy, but very different from the east coast. Chicago built suburban looking townhomes, and detached homes (albeit on tiny lots a mile from the loop). Think: Dearborn Park, etc.) You don't see that on the east coast.

And these other cities attracted immigration in a very similar way to Chicago from the same countries (all the Great Lakes cities have large Polish population). Metro Detroit when its doing ok economically (such as in the 1990s-early 200s) attracted a lot of immigrants: Lots of Arabs, Hmong, some eastern Europeans.

As for outdoorsy, progressive, and educated, this is next to godliness.
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Old 12-07-2009, 05:19 AM
 
Location: Chicagoland
4,028 posts, read 6,397,936 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjacobeclark View Post
I couldn't agree more. I think I hate the term "Midwest" more than anything in this world. There is no cohesive Midwest region like there is a New England or a Pacific Northwest or a Desert Southwest. There's the Great Lakes/Upper Midwest/East Central/Rust Belt region and there's the Great Plains/Lower Midwest/West Central/Farm Belt region. Call 'em whatever you like, just please don't ever lump them together like they're the same.
Well, I do agree that saying the Midwest is all the same is wrong, but every state in the Midwest is a major component in farming more than any of the other states (farming = growing crops not ranching etc.) And The Desert Southwest, Pacific Northwest and even more so New England are much smaller so they would have a more similar culture because those are sub-regions while the Midwest is just a region.
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Old 12-07-2009, 10:19 AM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,049,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
Ohio does seem to have a split personality. When you get over to eastern Ohio, Clevland or Akron area for example it does start to get a very slight northeast feal to it. Dayton or Toledo are solid midwest as they are very close to solid midwest states like Indiana or Michigan. Cincinatti is alot midwest with a bit of southern influence. Overall its obviously mostly midwestern as a state, but it does take on the charactaristics of its neighbors to the east and the south the closer you get to those borders.
Name a state that DOESN'T have a split personality!
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Old 12-07-2009, 10:22 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjacobeclark View Post
I couldn't agree more. I think I hate the term "Midwest" more than anything in this world. There is no cohesive Midwest region like there is a New England or a Pacific Northwest or a Desert Southwest. There's the Great Lakes/Upper Midwest/East Central/Rust Belt region and there's the Great Plains/Lower Midwest/West Central/Farm Belt region. Call 'em whatever you like, just please don't ever lump them together like they're the same.
So in which of your 2 regions would you place Madison?
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Old 12-07-2009, 10:35 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
So in which of your 2 regions would you place Madison?

It really makes a difference where you are in the Midwest. I would probably group Madison with Minneapolis.

Growing up in Eastern Iowa (and a college town, which makes a huge difference), that half of the state always seemed to be facing east. I would almost put Eastern Iowa as a "Great Lakes State". It usually votes solidly blue, is suprisingly progressive, and the past 20 years or so has actually had a more solid and healthy economy than much of the Midwest.

Western Iowa on the other hand seems to face west towards the Great Plains. It's much less populated than Eastern Iowa/Des Moines/Ames with their 7 metro areas that contain about half the state's population in themselves. Much more republican, and also much more involved in Agriculture per capita. Eastern Iowa has a great deal of farm country, but in reality only 2-3% of the Eastern part of the state's population actually lives and works on a farm. Out west it's around 8-9% because of the lack of cities to drown out the proportions.

Des Moines actually seems to look north towards the Twin Cities as far as economy, etc.

It's a very split state depending on where you are, and with so much land area I can easily say growing up in Iowa City that northwest Iowa was about as foreign to me as Wyoming.

Saying the "Midwest" mentality and culture is very misleading as everyone has already stated. It would be like throwing everything from Texas to Florida to Tennessee, Mississippi and South Carolina as "Southern".
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Old 12-07-2009, 07:08 PM
 
Location: Lower East Side, Milwaukee, WI
2,945 posts, read 4,149,388 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
So in which of your 2 regions would you place Madison?
I would place Madison into the Upper Midwest/Great Lakes region. I can see similarities between Madison and cities like Des Moines and Minneapolis, but I would also consider both Minnesota and Iowa to be Upper Midwest/Great Lakes states as well (despite Iowa not actually being located on a Great Lake). IMO, Iowa deserves the distinction of being an Upper Midwest/Great Lakes state more so than Indiana (which actually is located on a Great Lake). The reality is that Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan are the real true blue states in the region, while others like Illinois and Ohio simply have very large blue-leaning metros, like Chicago and Cleveland, that drown out the more conservative areas like Cincinnati and Springfield.
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Old 12-07-2009, 10:43 PM
 
Location: MN
3,798 posts, read 8,169,979 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Central Illinois 1 View Post
here in Minneapolis, we have more culture than all of LA.



You have GOT to be kidding!!!![/quote]

How much time have you spent in LA? How much time have you spent in MPLS?

I actually puked when I was in LA. Yes, I have been to LA. Yes, I have lived in LA. Yes, I have friends that still live in LA. Yes, I have spent significant time in LA. Yes, I have lived in MPLS. Yes, MPLS>LA. LA is pure garbage. I'd pick SD to live over any part of CA except norCAL, maybe. Pretentious A_holes, with a 10-1 guy to gal ratio filled with a bunch of underappreciating, underworked, and materialistic d bags. I came to find that EVERYBODY I met and liked in LA were from ANYWHERE BUT CA.
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Old 12-07-2009, 10:45 PM
 
Location: MN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjacobeclark View Post
I would place Madison into the Upper Midwest/Great Lakes region. I can see similarities between Madison and cities like Des Moines and Minneapolis, but I would also consider both Minnesota and Iowa to be Upper Midwest/Great Lakes states as well (despite Iowa not actually being located on a Great Lake). IMO, Iowa deserves the distinction of being an Upper Midwest/Great Lakes state more so than Indiana (which actually is located on a Great Lake). The reality is that Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan are the real true blue states in the region, while others like Illinois and Ohio simply have very large blue-leaning metros, like Chicago and Cleveland, that drown out the more conservative areas like Cincinnati and Springfield.

False. MN is more than likely a RED state, however the lefty liberals in the Twin Cities metropolitan area of over 3.5 million makes the state seem like it is Blue. A lot more goes into MN than the Twin Cities, which are the nucleus of our wonderful state.
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Old 12-08-2009, 12:11 AM
 
Location: Chicagoland
4,028 posts, read 6,397,936 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knke0204 View Post
False. MN is more than likely a RED state, however the lefty liberals in the Twin Cities metropolitan area of over 3.5 million makes the state seem like it is Blue. A lot more goes into MN than the Twin Cities, which are the nucleus of our wonderful state.
It's true that there is more to a state than a city or metro that dominates it. But to say that a lot more (and not just in this case, but in any) goes on outside of the city and or metro is pretty much wrong when talking about politics because it is blue because the Twin Cities make it that way because there are more people there so naturally there is more going on there.
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