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Old 11-28-2009, 07:23 PM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post

They have NH described very accurately. I am open-minded, somewhat neurotic, and introverted. All of my friends have somewhat similar personality types.
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Old 11-28-2009, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Concrete jungle where dreams are made of.
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Good to know that according to that map, NY is one of the top states when it comes to openness
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Old 11-28-2009, 07:54 PM
 
Location: Hernando County, FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachael84 View Post
Good to know that according to that map, NY is one of the top states when it comes to openness
And highly neurotic.
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Old 11-28-2009, 09:20 PM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
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Originally Posted by ShadowCaver View Post
I thought of showing that one, but I'm not entirely certain what it means. I could kind of see how both New England and Utah are moralistic, if using different forms of morality, but I'm not sure. I don't know if I thought of Eastern Arizona as particularly "traditionalist" but again I'm not sure what they mean by these terms. It seems like Eastern Arizona is more American Indian and Mexican, which do have a traditionalism to them. However they're also sort-of blanket terms that can describe many things.
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Old 11-28-2009, 10:49 PM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
I thought of showing that one, but I'm not entirely certain what it means. I could kind of see how both New England and Utah are moralistic, if using different forms of morality, but I'm not sure.
The demographics of Utah compared to New England are polar opposites. Utah has the prevailing LDS culture which tends to be quite natalistic, while New England has a more hedonistic culture with rugged individualistic undertones.
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Old 11-28-2009, 11:46 PM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
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New England does have a moralistic side to it, maybe not New Hampshire as much. It's just a moralism that's progressive rather than traditional. I could be wrong, but I think anti-smoking ordinances are popular in many of those places as is environmentalism. As well as seminars on being better to gays and minorities. It's the liberal/progressive morality of "liberty, equality, harm reduction." At least that's how it seems from the Central Time Zone.
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Old 11-28-2009, 11:51 PM
 
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Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
The demographics of Utah compared to New England are polar opposites. Utah has the prevailing LDS culture which tends to be quite natalistic, while New England has a more hedonistic culture with rugged individualistic undertones.
I've never heard New England described as "hedonistic." Care to elaborate?
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Old 11-29-2009, 09:20 AM
 
11,171 posts, read 22,361,018 times
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Originally Posted by free_food View Post
Interesting map.

One thing about this map as well (religious adherants) - most of the dark read areas in the great plains are counties with VERY few people - maybe a couple thousand - and most of them have no decent sized cities.

I think when you're rural or small town, people tend to stick around the church more as something to bring the community together compared to a large city where you have a lot of people concerned about a lot of things.

These are also areas that haven't had large influxes of people into them since they were settled 150 years ago with highly religious Lutheran Europeans. The church has followed through to this day. The areas are some of the oldest as far as median age, and also have a lot of population loss to other areas of the country. I'm sure people who weren't as into the religious aspects and the small townness of it all picked up and left at a younger age. This condenses the population into more solidly religious, which might drive more people out who just don't want to live that mold.
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Old 11-29-2009, 12:16 PM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crisp444 View Post
I've never heard New England described as "hedonistic." Care to elaborate?
It is a philosophy that is more intrinsic than extrinsic. It was probably a bad word choice for me to use. I would say that the culture in New England values self-reliance, self-sufficiency, volunteerism, community involvement, and educational achievement. I am not very familiar with the culture of Utah so I can't really elaborate on that point or draw any comparisons between the two places. However, the one similarity that both areas share is the strong English ancestry component.
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Old 11-29-2009, 12:20 PM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,927,262 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
New England does have a moralistic side to it, maybe not New Hampshire as much. It's just a moralism that's progressive rather than traditional. I could be wrong, but I think anti-smoking ordinances are popular in many of those places as is environmentalism. As well as seminars on being better to gays and minorities. It's the liberal/progressive morality of "liberty, equality, harm reduction." At least that's how it seems from the Central Time Zone.
I should elaborate. I do think that moralism is a trait that is common everywhere. Traditional values can take on many different forms as well. NH would be considered progressive in terms of educational achievement, overall quality of life, access to healthcare amenities, environmental awareness, an understanding of the GLBT community, and a populace that is actively involved in the town they live in.
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