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Old 11-21-2013, 12:37 PM
 
1,027 posts, read 1,650,945 times
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It is country word.I would never ever use it.

Same has other country words like I'm fixin or I reckon.

Fixin' - Intending. "I'm fixin' to go there next week."
Reckon - Guess, believe, suppose. "I reckon it doesn't make any difference."

Yes it is country.


The word
supper in proper use comes before dinner .


In the country you have super a big meal and than dinner the light meal .

Supper is a name for the evening meal in some dialects of English. While often used interchangeably with "dinner" today, supper was traditionally a separate meal. "Dinner" traditionally had been used to refer to the main and most formal meal of the day, which, from the Middle Ages until the 18th century, was most often the midday meal. When the evening meal became the main meal, it was referred to as "dinner"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supper
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Old 11-21-2013, 12:47 PM
 
Location: Englewood, Near Eastside Indy
8,345 posts, read 14,115,137 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PDX_LAX View Post
The only people I know who say supper are my relatives in Ohio. My relatives in nearby Kentucky and every other American I've talked to says dinner.
When I lived in Kentucky, everyone called the last meal of the day supper. In fact; my mother when she first moved to Kentucky from Michigan invited some new in-laws over for dinner, thinking they would come over around 6 or 7 in the evening. They showed up around noon for lunch. Every one of them.

Speaking for myself, I have heard a smattering of the word supper everywhere I have lived. It is not a word that exists in my vocabulary.
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Old 11-22-2013, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Just East of the Southern Portion of the Western Part of PA
1,240 posts, read 3,222,218 times
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Just to add to the confusion; why do some people call their lunch pail a "dinner bucket?"...

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Old 11-23-2013, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,211 posts, read 54,678,928 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny C View Post
Just to add to the confusion; why do some people call their lunch pail a "dinner bucket?"...

The same reason some people would call a lunch box a lunch "pail", I guess.

Never heard of carrying one's lunch in a pail!
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Old 11-23-2013, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Keizer, OR
1,376 posts, read 2,518,387 times
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I usually say supper, but they both mean the same thing to me.
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