U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
 
Old 12-05-2009, 10:40 AM
 
1,645 posts, read 2,048,509 times
Reputation: 1294
Standard French.

There's really no use for Quebecois French in the U.S. unless you live in northern Maine or upstate New York.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-05-2009, 11:24 AM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,992 posts, read 6,967,783 times
Reputation: 2939
Quote:
Originally Posted by ReluctantGardenStater View Post
Standard French.

There's really no use for Quebecois French in the U.S. unless you live in northern Maine or upstate New York.
There's far less use for French French in the U.S. All of the USA is far closer to Canada than France, and Americans are much more likely to run into a Canadian than a French person. I've met French Canadians, but I don't think I've ever seen a French person (except when I traveled to France).

Canadian French is far more useful in the United States. Do you think they teach British English in Quebec?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2009, 12:25 PM
 
1,645 posts, read 2,048,509 times
Reputation: 1294
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwriter View Post
There's far less use for French French in the U.S. All of the USA is far closer to Canada than France, and Americans are much more likely to run into a Canadian than a French person. I've met French Canadians, but I don't think I've ever seen a French person (except when I traveled to France).

Canadian French is far more useful in the United States. Do you think they teach British English in Quebec?
France is the most visited nation in the world and I have met many more people who have been to France than Quebec/French Canada, and I live in a relatively Northern area of the country. It's a lot closer to get to Quebec by car from NJ/NY than to get to Florida, yet I have met very few folks who travel to French Canada in comparison to those who have been to the South, the Caribbean, Europe, etc. This is not a prime vacation destination and daily encounters with French Canadians are extremely limited.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2009, 12:27 PM
 
Location: southern california
49,383 posts, read 45,951,277 times
Reputation: 40462
parisian french and quebec french are still the same language. its true, sometimes there are problems but its doable. you should see me try to talk to english people i gota ask 4 times. lol.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2009, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
4,383 posts, read 5,468,692 times
Reputation: 5375
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colddiamond102 View Post
Je pense qu'il est français standard...

But I could be wrong. Sorry if some of my sentence is wrong...I havent used French in quite a while.
J'ai sai un peu de francais aussi, Je prends dans l'ecole lol. I agree standard French is taught at school.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2009, 09:44 PM
 
Location: New Hampshire
2,260 posts, read 4,263,210 times
Reputation: 3857
Quote:
Originally Posted by ReluctantGardenStater View Post
Standard French.

There's really no use for Quebecois French in the U.S. unless you live in northern Maine or upstate New York.
It's not really that limited. Québécois French is much more widely spoken by native Francophones across New England than European French (not only in northern Maine, but also in mill towns across the state, northern VT & NH, the Merrimack Valley cities in NH & MA, the Blackstone Valley cities in RI & MA, and Windham county in CT). It is primarily spoken by older speakers but it is far from useless.

French-Canadians also make up the single largest group of foreign vacationers in New England. If you go to the beach in Maine or New Hampshire in the summer you're bound to hear as much French as English.

As for those living in Louisiana, Cajun French is much closer to Québécois French than it is to European French.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-16-2009, 11:26 AM
 
Location: southeastern Louisiana
2 posts, read 2,520 times
Reputation: 10
At my school it was standard French with some Cajun French thrown in because of the area of Louisiana I live in. The older generation still speaks Cajun French but it is dying out as the elderly die so we are losing our language but the school's are finally teaching the Cajun French that is part of our heritage.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-16-2009, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Searching n Atlanta
745 posts, read 1,048,263 times
Reputation: 274
I think in the US they teach the standard of any language, I never learned french but I know they teach Spainard Spanish which is the standard and Not Mexican Spanish which is used in America.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-16-2009, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,992 posts, read 6,967,783 times
Reputation: 2939
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mgyeldell View Post
I think in the US they teach the standard of any language, I never learned french but I know they teach Spainard Spanish which is the standard and Not Mexican Spanish which is used in America.
I learned primarily Mexican Spanish in school (I graduated fairly recently). We touched on the Castilian and South American forms of the languages and differences from Mexican Spanish, but the Mexican form was what was taught. The reasons for this are obvious, considering the number of Mexicans living here in the states. I don't doubt that there are some schools teaching European Spanish, but the ones I've encountered don't.

Really, Mexican Spanish makes far more sense for Americans than the (vastly different) European form of the language. It would be like Mexicans studying British English instead of American.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-16-2009, 04:14 PM
 
Location: La Jolla, California
77 posts, read 130,333 times
Reputation: 32
I took French from 6th through 10th grade, it was standard French, though we learned in our cultural segments a bit about Que(accent a gou)bec. However the middle school i went to went into some conciderations about cutting our French program.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top