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Old 12-13-2009, 01:24 PM
 
Location: The High Seas
7,379 posts, read 13,361,672 times
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I saw this on CNN just now and thought it was very illustrative of just how bad things look when you get a wider perspective. Given that the map says that the U.S. had 8.8% unemployment in October 2009 (I think it was quite a bit higher than that!), the 'colors' might really be bleaker.


multimediafinal (http://cohort11.americanobserver.net/latoyaegwuekwe/multimediafinal.html - broken link)
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Old 12-13-2009, 01:39 PM
 
354 posts, read 752,788 times
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I would like to see what it looks like now with the unemployment rate over 10%. It almost look like the spread of a disease.
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Old 12-14-2009, 03:58 PM
 
12 posts, read 18,102 times
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Wages are too high. They should be half what they are. Economics 101.
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Old 12-14-2009, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Chicago
3,340 posts, read 8,710,476 times
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Nebraska is the only state without purple in it........
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Old 12-14-2009, 05:06 PM
 
Location: Orange, California
1,573 posts, read 5,654,972 times
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Fascinating map. What struck me is how much purple (high unemployment) there was in the Mississippi Delta region in the supposed good times in early 2007. I know Detroit and other rust belt areas have had it rough for awhile, but the map illustrates that there were other areas suffering too before the bottom fell out on everyone.
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Old 12-14-2009, 06:17 PM
 
Location: Oak Park, IL
5,522 posts, read 12,296,789 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goozer View Post
Fascinating map. What struck me is how much purple (high unemployment) there was in the Mississippi Delta region in the supposed good times in early 2007. I know Detroit and other rust belt areas have had it rough for awhile, but the map illustrates that there were other areas suffering too before the bottom fell out on everyone.
The Mississippi Delta region has had high unemployment/high poverty for over 100 years.
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Old 12-15-2009, 10:35 AM
 
3,284 posts, read 2,870,863 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Revolution2 View Post
Wages are too high. They should be half what they are. Economics 101.
That may work if the government wasn't hell bent on destroying the dollar. If you think people could cut their wages in half and still survive then you are out of your mind.

Now, I will agree lower wages can be a good thing, it should in turn decrease the cost of US manufactured good and help them compete for export, but that is just never going to happen.

If anything, non-union wages are too low while union wages are wayy too high on average.
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Old 12-16-2009, 02:30 AM
 
737 posts, read 1,041,180 times
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Seeing the unemployment in Michigan is terrible. I really hope things turn around.
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Old 12-16-2009, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Western North Carolina
4,954 posts, read 7,888,764 times
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Wages ARE being cut. We didn't have a minimum wage increase for a decade (even as prices on everything else rose), benefits are being slashed, many pensions are being frozen or eliminated, 401k matches ceased, and there has been a a steady progression from full-time to part-time employment, and a trend towads temporary employment and away from secure, permanent jobs. Where I work, we haven't had a cost of living wage increase in three years. Doesn't seem to be helping anything, except sending more profits to a select few.

I heard an economist say that a true living wage in this country needs to be about $13.00 to $14.00 per hour MINIMUM. What a stiminulation to the economy THAT would be, and there would be much less of a drain on government assistance and subsidies. But that will never happen.
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Old 12-16-2009, 08:10 AM
 
Location: MichOhioigan
1,546 posts, read 2,539,002 times
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I live in Michigan (stop laughing) and watching this progression map I find that on the plus side Michigan's color did not change much over the 2+ years. On the negative side...well you know the story.
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