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Old 12-17-2009, 04:58 PM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tmac9wr View Post
Cool map!

I always laugh at stuff like this...the traditional "Bible Belt" is statistically more evil than the Heretics up in the Northeast...with the exception of Greed (give me money!!)

I remember while I was at Clemson, people would talk about the neighborly-love of the South and how Northerners were so cold to one another. I would always stand there with a shat-eating grin on my face and nod while thinking "if only you knew what the statistics showed".
There are religious areas of the country that did come out "saintly" though. Parts of Nebraska and the Dakotas have high amounts of "Lutheran-Church Missouri Synod" members and LCMS is highly conservative Protestantism. It's just not dispensationalist or "Rapture" focused. Northwest Iowa has a strong element of Dutch Reformed Church and much of it is, basically, Fundamentalist. Mormonism doesn't fit into these things, but it's a strict Christ-oriented religion.

So compare the regions deemed "saintly", which I think was a sort of yellow, to the following maps.

http://www.valpo.edu/geomet/pics/geo...igion/lcms.gif
http://www.valpo.edu/geomet/pics/geo...n/reformed.gif
http://www.valpo.edu/geomet/pics/geo...ion/mormon.gif

I'm not saying there's an exact correlation, but I think you might find more "saintly" counties among these.

It's unfortunate that Americans image of devout religion is a few specific kinds of Protestantism. Northwest Iowa in particular strikes me, from what I've read, as being fairly deemed a "Bible Belt." They have several strict Christian colleges and Sioux County, Iowa is one of the most Republican counties in the nation.
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Old 12-17-2009, 07:34 PM
 
Location: The Woods
16,955 posts, read 22,268,498 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
There are religious areas of the country that did come out "saintly" though. Parts of Nebraska and the Dakotas have high amounts of "Lutheran-Church Missouri Synod" members and LCMS is highly conservative Protestantism. It's just not dispensationalist or "Rapture" focused. Northwest Iowa has a strong element of Dutch Reformed Church and much of it is, basically, Fundamentalist. Mormonism doesn't fit into these things, but it's a strict Christ-oriented religion.

So compare the regions deemed "saintly", which I think was a sort of yellow, to the following maps.

http://www.valpo.edu/geomet/pics/geo...igion/lcms.gif
http://www.valpo.edu/geomet/pics/geo...n/reformed.gif
http://www.valpo.edu/geomet/pics/geo...ion/mormon.gif

I'm not saying there's an exact correlation, but I think you might find more "saintly" counties among these.

It's unfortunate that Americans image of devout religion is a few specific kinds of Protestantism. Northwest Iowa in particular strikes me, from what I've read, as being fairly deemed a "Bible Belt." They have several strict Christian colleges and Sioux County, Iowa is one of the most Republican counties in the nation.
There's also the (primarily French originally) Catholics in parts of Northern Maine. To a degree in parts of the Northeast Kingdom of VT as well where I grew up though I have seen considerably more in N. ME.

It's quite true American Christianity isn't just the Protestant Bible Belt brand...The Northern New England states of Vermont and Maine until recently voted more conservatively than the South (voting against FDR for instance). But it's a different brand of Christianity, and a different type of conservative for that matter...
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Old 12-18-2009, 01:01 AM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
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Although I'm Catholic I didn't get into Catholic because it might be "too different."

Louisiana is listed by Gallup as among "the most religious" states and is quite Catholic.

"State of the States" Series
Religious Identity: States Differ Widely

Many Cajuns I think are still fairly conservative, if not always virtuous, Catholics. Although at times they believed in racial segregation even though this was out of conformity with Church tradition against racism. Interesting, possibly related to that, Louisiana traditionally has about the largest populations of African American Catholics in the nation. Certainly one of the longest traditions of it exempting Maryland.

Nebraska and the Dakotas have some highly conservative Catholic counties. Cedar County, Nebraska didn't even go for JFK, although it did go for LBJ. Also they had that Nebraska archbishop who was going to excommunicate people for belonging to Pro-Euthanasia or Pro-Abortion groups. (A view I agreed with by and large)
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Old 12-18-2009, 02:49 PM
 
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Much of Indiana, Ohio and Missouri seem like the Bible Belt in a lot of ways. As a Christian, I think thats a GOOD thing!
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Old 12-18-2009, 02:51 PM
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Location: Ohio
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To keep this thread focused on areas that are on-topic for General US, let's stick to the geography aspect of this topic and resist the temptation to discuss characteristics or behavior of people of specific religions.
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Old 03-13-2010, 12:39 AM
 
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Quote:
What states are included in the "Bible Belt"? I know it is mainly southern states, but what are the other states?
Outside of the South, Utah and Idaho are very religious states.
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Old 03-16-2010, 11:28 PM
 
1,250 posts, read 2,117,296 times
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The real question is that there is more than one "Bible Belt" in actuality. Though the other places should have different names due to being different in how they view the Bible since one of the defining characteristics is biblical inerrancy. There is for example both a "Northern Belt" and a "Mormon Belt" as well.

Areas in the Southern-type Bible Belt should depend on how dominant evangelical Protestantism is in the local culture. Also there are enclaves of it as well. (Colorado Springs is a good example) I found in Missouri at least the half below the Missouri River and possibly everywhere outside of St. Louis is part of the belt, a good indicator of when you enter it from St. Louis is what billboards say.
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Old 03-17-2010, 01:36 AM
 
Location: Pasadena
7,412 posts, read 8,239,526 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
There are religious areas of the country that did come out "saintly" though. Parts of Nebraska and the Dakotas have high amounts of "Lutheran-Church Missouri Synod" members and LCMS is highly conservative Protestantism. It's just not dispensationalist or "Rapture" focused. Northwest Iowa has a strong element of Dutch Reformed Church and much of it is, basically, Fundamentalist. Mormonism doesn't fit into these things, but it's a strict Christ-oriented religion.

So compare the regions deemed "saintly", which I think was a sort of yellow, to the following maps.

http://www.valpo.edu/geomet/pics/geo...igion/lcms.gif
http://www.valpo.edu/geomet/pics/geo...n/reformed.gif
http://www.valpo.edu/geomet/pics/geo...ion/mormon.gif

I'm not saying there's an exact correlation, but I think you might find more "saintly" counties among these.

It's unfortunate that Americans image of devout religion is a few specific kinds of Protestantism. Northwest Iowa in particular strikes me, from what I've read, as being fairly deemed a "Bible Belt." They have several strict Christian colleges and Sioux County, Iowa is one of the most Republican counties in the nation.
Appreciate all the links & data you provide. Quite interesting. I don't think Lutherans can be considered "Bible Belt" but just like Catholics, there are very conservative Lutherans. But both denominations allow if not encourage alcohol use, are less involved in social issues for the most part & aren't very out there trying to convert sinners! The Midwest doesn't seem very Bible-Belt like but the people living there are rather conservative.
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Old 03-18-2010, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Long Beach
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It all has to do with urbanity, education and population demographics, and general wealth.

In general, the South is poorer, less educated and less densely populated than the Northeast. It becomes a breeding ground for religious fanaticism.

The Bible Belt might also include the mountain states and the Great Plains.
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Old 03-20-2010, 01:06 AM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
5,412 posts, read 7,708,904 times
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>>>>>>
[quote=Thomas R.;12058868]Although not entirely relational there's this map of counties by Baptist population.

http://www.valpo.edu/geomet/pics/geo...on/baptist.gif

And this map more specific to Southern Baptists. I think it's more dated though as it's from 1990.

http://www.adherents.com/maps/map_us_sbc.jpg

Generally I'd say Alabama, Arkansas, Mississippi, Oklahoma and Tennessee would count. (Not that all parts of each state would) In one survey Alabama, Arkansas, Tennessee, and West Virginia had the highest percentages believing the Bible is literally true.

Outside the "traditional South" there are places that might count. Parts of West Michigan have been called "The Michigan Bible Belt" as they have strong/conservative Dutch Reformed Church presence. More direct might be parts of Southern Missouri that have high percentages of Southern Baptists and Pentecostals. Dunkin County, Missouri is 70% Southern Baptist or Pentecostal.
<<<<<<

You are quite right to include Oklahoma as an integral state within the Bible Belt. From Tulsa to DFW and OK City to Little Rock you essentially have the most theologically/socially conservative folks in the nation.
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