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Old 12-20-2009, 04:27 PM
 
1,605 posts, read 3,412,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajaxrasputin View Post
Newark is called the "Brick City" however anyone who has been there knows that most of the city isn't brick. For instance, most of the housing is made from wood. New York, Philadelphia, and maybe Baltimore are way more brick based cities than Newark.
Where did you go in Newark? Most of the buildings I've seen in Newark were made brick, even the new ones.
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Old 12-20-2009, 08:46 PM
 
Location: St Louis
1,117 posts, read 2,590,980 times
Reputation: 363
Quote:
Originally Posted by DinsdalePirahna View Post
No. As I have pointed out in a previous reply: Just go to Queens, NY. The residential part of the Borough is almost all brick and has a larger population.
Now thats a bold statement and I am sure you have proof that a higher percentage of buildings in Queens contain more brick that STL's building stock. I would encourage you to take a drive through North and South STL.
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Old 12-20-2009, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
5,847 posts, read 11,014,398 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brickmama View Post
Now thats a bold statement and I am sure you have proof that a higher percentage of buildings in Queens contain more brick that STL's building stock. I would encourage you to take a drive through North and South STL.
I would encourage you too to see more of the country.

Saint Louis does not own bricks. And even if it did, who really cares?
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Old 12-20-2009, 09:25 PM
 
Location: St Louis
1,117 posts, read 2,590,980 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DinsdalePirahna View Post
I would encourage you too to see more of the country.

Saint Louis does not own bricks. And even if it did, who really cares?
Yeah guess what, I have been to Queens 3 times.

Obviously you care since you dispute what everyone has to say in this thread.

The poster wants 10 brick cities and St Louis certainly fits in this top 10.
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Old 12-20-2009, 09:44 PM
 
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
5,847 posts, read 11,014,398 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brickmama View Post
Yeah guess what, I have been to Queens 3 times.

Obviously you care since you dispute what everyone has to say in this thread.

The poster wants 10 brick cities and St Louis certainly fits in this top 10.
see post #2
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Old 12-21-2009, 10:50 AM
 
2,770 posts, read 5,355,507 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajaxrasputin View Post
Newark is called the "Brick City" however anyone who has been there knows that most of the city isn't brick. For instance, most of the housing is made from wood. New York, Philadelphia, and maybe Baltimore are way more brick based cities than Newark.
Newark was called 'Brick City' b/c of those super-block housing projects that were built (and there was an ocean of them), but they were torn down.

Additionally, Newark housing is only wood-based in some neighborhoods, but many neighborhoods have brick-based housing, and a lot of the more recent construction is brick.
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Old 12-21-2009, 08:40 PM
 
5,857 posts, read 14,041,383 times
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Milwaukee's nickname is "The Cream City". Not because of dairy products, but because of the color of the bricks that are seen on buildings across the city. It's a unique, off-white color resembling the color of cream. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cream_City_brick

Another tidbit: In Chicago, the bricks used on the South Side are a different color than the bricks used on the North Side. Has to do with the fact that the quarries from which the clay came had different shades of color. I believe the North Side's bricks are lighter, the South Side's are deeper red. (Correct me if I'm wrong, Chicagoans!)
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Old 12-22-2009, 07:16 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
2,851 posts, read 5,586,378 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DinsdalePirahna View Post
No. As I have pointed out in a previous reply: Just go to Queens, NY. The residential part of the Borough is almost all brick and has a larger population.
Brooklyn is a lot brickier than Queens.
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Old 12-22-2009, 07:58 AM
 
Location: Chicago, Il
270 posts, read 739,583 times
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I would agree that St. Louis is very high on this list. That is, if we are going by percentage of buildings that are brick. If it is by sheer numbers, twenty other cities are probably above us. However, in terms of percentage, it's gotta be in the high 90s. I can't think of one neighborhood that isn't almost all brick. I am sure many older industrial cities are much the same way and can't comment on NYC burroughs, so maybe they are just as high.
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Old 12-22-2009, 05:31 PM
 
Location: detroit
15 posts, read 56,171 times
Reputation: 13
DETROIT, "all the homes and apartment buildings in detroit are brick, these homes are the original homes that were built in the late 1800 to around 1940s. very few new homes built in Detroit. the homes all, still have the original piping,boilers, and good strong hardwood floors
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