U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-26-2009, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
3,995 posts, read 8,864,135 times
Reputation: 901

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by cacto View Post
miamiman, what major cross streets in Tucson is Civano located at?
The first one looks like New Mexico, horrible interpretations of the New Mexican flat roofed adobe.

As for the "exotic" plants in gravel-scape, this is a form of xeroscaping with low water use plants, many native to Arizona or desert regions. This is replacing older development uses of high pollen producing varieties common in the 1890's-1960's in Phoenix and brought by those migrating from the east or California (mulberry trees, olive trees, eucalyptus, etc that are truly "exotic" to the desert southwest). I'm not a fan of much suburban development and the best way to avoid is to look for infill housing and urban settings where public transportation makes mobility easy for the most widely used public/private spaces; the airport, the city center, arenas, stadiums, theaters, museums, universities, grocery stores, etc and the only city where this exists in the Southwest is in "The Valley" or the urban heart of the Phoenix region.

Downtown Mesa's new 4 mile eastward expansion of light rail into the core of the city is expected to draw tens of thousands of more light rail commuters and riders monthly as the Mesa Sycamore/Main station is the most used station on the line; thanks to a great commuter/rapid bus line called Link, that brings commuters to the station from bus stops and transit centers around the East Valley. The federal government is expected to help fund the heavily used light rail system expansion under the new plans to increase infrastructure spending on heavily used mass transit/rail options.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-26-2009, 07:44 PM
 
1,201 posts, read 1,988,036 times
Reputation: 717
quality of life, wealth, intelligence, education, etc., w/out a doubt los alamos, nm. reportedly, about two years ago, the largest concentration of intelligent people in the united states. they need to pat themselves on the back. personally, i would satisfy all of the qualifications (); however, i would not like their weather.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-26-2009, 09:13 PM
 
Location: 602/520
2,441 posts, read 6,120,370 times
Reputation: 1815
Quote:
Originally Posted by fcorrales80 View Post
The first one looks like New Mexico, horrible interpretations of the New Mexican flat roofed adobe.

As for the "exotic" plants in gravel-scape, this is a form of xeroscaping with low water use plants, many native to Arizona or desert regions. This is replacing older development uses of high pollen producing varieties common in the 1890's-1960's in Phoenix and brought by those migrating from the east or California (mulberry trees, olive trees, eucalyptus, etc that are truly "exotic" to the desert southwest). I'm not a fan of much suburban development and the best way to avoid is to look for infill housing and urban settings where public transportation makes mobility easy for the most widely used public/private spaces; the airport, the city center, arenas, stadiums, theaters, museums, universities, grocery stores, etc and the only city where this exists in the Southwest is in "The Valley" or the urban heart of the Phoenix region.

Downtown Mesa's new 4 mile eastward expansion of light rail into the core of the city is expected to draw tens of thousands of more light rail commuters and riders monthly as the Mesa Sycamore/Main station is the most used station on the line; thanks to a great commuter/rapid bus line called Link, that brings commuters to the station from bus stops and transit centers around the East Valley. The federal government is expected to help fund the heavily used light rail system expansion under the new plans to increase infrastructure spending on heavily used mass transit/rail options.
Like I said, structures are made out of recycled materials. Not all homes in Civano are this style. However it looks, it's sure better than the taco-bell styled homes that 85 percent of the Valley housing stock is comprised of.
Civano was actually just in the top 5 sites of HGTV's Dream Home 2010: Southwest style.



Also, the flowering trees ARE native trees. They're acacia trees. The photo was taken during spring, thus the flowers. They aren't widely planted in Phoenix because people prefer the same non-native Aleppo Pine, Ficus, Citrus, Palm combination everywhere.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-26-2009, 09:22 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
3,995 posts, read 8,864,135 times
Reputation: 901
Quote:
Originally Posted by miamiman View Post
Like I said, structures are made out of recycled materials. Not all homes in Civano are this style. However it looks, it's sure better than the taco-bell styled homes that 85 percent of the Valley housing stock is comprised of.
Civano was actually just in the top 5 sites of HGTV's Dream Home 2010: Southwest style.



Also, the flowering trees ARE native trees. They're acacia trees. The photo was taken during spring, thus the flowers. They aren't widely planted in Phoenix because people prefer the same non-native Aleppo Pine, Ficus, Citrus, Palm combination everywhere.
I love acacia! I just don't really like those faux pueblo style of homes and prefer the Spanish colonial influence found in Phoenix more than Tucson which does have a lot of these brightly colored, mismatched dwellings. I like the recycled material use however!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-28-2009, 03:23 PM
 
857 posts, read 1,412,631 times
Reputation: 186
Default Hard Architecture In Southwest Neighborhoods

Quote:
Originally Posted by miamiman View Post
There is a development like that in Tucson. Civano, on the east side, has very narrow streets, utilizes solar energy and rainwater harvesting technologies, builds only with recycled materials, has only native vegetation, and is not gated.

It was designed by the creator of the New Urbanist movement, Andres Duany. As for cost, most of the homes run between $90,000 and $200,000.
That is good that they are affordable. However, as you can see from the photos, there are elements of "hard architecture" that is so boring in suburban Vegas, Phoenix, and Tucson: everything is at right angles, the trees are the same species, the colors are all the same, the sidewalk is separated from the street with a useless 20' gravel strip, the wall is the same color in front of every house, etc.

Compare this to older neighborhoods on the West Coast or Northeast or Colorado where each house is unique with its own suite of plant species. No restrictions on what you can plant, and the sidewalk is closer to the street, giving homeowners more privacy and more private property.

I guess the only two places that I've seen in the Southwest that are different from house to house are Nob Hill in Albuquerque and much of Santa Fe. I do not like HOA mandated restrictions.

Why not plant grass in the gravel strips?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-28-2009, 06:11 PM
JBM
 
Location: New Mexico!
558 posts, read 932,019 times
Reputation: 490
Hmmm... Best SW city in my opinion would be a close race between Tucson and Albuquerque. In a lot of ways, they're sister cities. They share very much in common. However, I would pick Albuquerque over Tucson due to the fact that ABQ has or seems to have a more unique culture, more desirable scenery, slightly cooler temperature, and an awesome food scene(food is very important to me lol). Of course, in the end this is all just opinion. Some like Tucson better for their own reasons. There's really no way to fairly and objectively compare two cities. But, for me, Albuquerque.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-28-2009, 08:47 PM
 
Location: Phoenix Arizona
2,032 posts, read 4,033,834 times
Reputation: 2693
Quote:
Originally Posted by CCCVDUR View Post
That is good that they are affordable. However, as you can see from the photos, there are elements of "hard architecture" that is so boring in suburban Vegas, Phoenix, and Tucson: everything is at right angles, the trees are the same species, the colors are all the same, the sidewalk is separated from the street with a useless 20' gravel strip, the wall is the same color in front of every house, etc.

Compare this to older neighborhoods on the West Coast or Northeast or Colorado where each house is unique with its own suite of plant species. No restrictions on what you can plant, and the sidewalk is closer to the street, giving homeowners more privacy and more private property.

I guess the only two places that I've seen in the Southwest that are different from house to house are Nob Hill in Albuquerque and much of Santa Fe. I do not like HOA mandated restrictions.

Why not plant grass in the gravel strips?
I agree about everything looking the same how it's tedious. I think it's a matter of time when it comes to each house looking different. Most neighborhoods in metro AZ are less than 20 years old or so. Eventually HOAs vote to dissolve themselves and houses start to gain character.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-25-2010, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
5,643 posts, read 7,446,834 times
Reputation: 4317
Quote:
Originally Posted by miamiman View Post
Centro, Zen Rock, Club Congress, Vaudeville, Sharks, IBT. All clubs, not dive bars. All within walking distance of each other. All within downtown TUCSON.

Bars along this corridor: The District, Cushing Street Bar, Sports Bar, Maynard's, The Buffet, Shanty, O'Malleys, Maloney's, The Hut, Bison Wiches, Che's, Plush, Surly Wench, Bumstead's, Pancho Villa's, Auld Dubliner, No Anchovies, Frog and Firkin, and Gentle Ben's. All of these places are within walking distance of each other. Not bad for a town of 550,000.
Obviously, there are nice bars, clubs ( like Level Bar | Lounge: Welcome to 2010! Check our upcoming events!
Pearl Tucson ) scattered throughout Tucson, but these examples of some of the clubs, bars, live venues which attract all different types of clientele are all within walking distance. I left out restaurants, although I did include a couple that have consistently active bars. It's not Austin, but it brings a lot of energy to the area.

Centro - CentroLounge.Com - Centro Lounge / Stone & Congress / 520.445.2937 / Reviving Downtown Nightlife

Zen Rock - XML DRIVEN AS3

Sapphire Lounge - Sapphire Lounge | Facebook

Club Congress & The Tap Room - The Historic Hotel Congress – Tucson, AZ » Photos (http://www.hotelcongress.com/club/photos/ - broken link)

Sharks - MySpace - Sharks Night Club - 25 - Female - TUCSON, Arizona - myspace.com/sharksnightclub Rumor has it that Sharks as well as the District have been sold and will be turned into a gay bar...

Rialto Theatre - The Historic Rialto Theatre - Tucson AZ

Vaudeville - Tucson Underground | Places | Vaudeville

IBT's - MySpace - IBT's - 21 - Male - Tucson, Arizona - myspace.com/ibtstucson

The Wildcat House - Welcome to the Wildcat House website!

Sky Bar - Sky Bar - Tucson, AZ

Plush - Plush - Live Music, Always - Index

The Shanty - Tucson Drinking Liberally: The Shanty on 4th Avenue (http://arizona.typepad.com/drinkingliberally/the-shanty-on-4th-avenue.html - broken link)

The Hut - the hut on MySpace Music - Free Streaming MP3s, Pictures & Music Downloads

Maloney's - Maloney's Tavern

O'Malley's - O'Malley's on Fourth on DoTucson.com (http://www.dotucson.com/nightshort.asp?qry=315 - broken link)

Che's Lounge - Tucson.com Photos - Che's Lounge/CIMG2037 (http://photos.tucson.com/displayimage.php?album=98&pos=0 - broken link)

Buffet Bar -

Bison Witches - BisonWitches.com - Home of Bison Witches Bar & Deli - Main Page

Surely Wench & The Parlour Room - www.surlywenchpub.com

The Red Room (at the Grill) - Tucson Underground | Places | The Red Room

Gentle Ben's - Gentle Ben's Brewery Company (http://www.gentlebens.com/content/display/file/index.php - broken link)

The Auld Dubliner - Auld Dubliner Tucson (http://www.aulddubliner.com/Tucson/ - broken link)

Frog & Firkin - Frog & Firkin

Sports on Congress - SPORT’S ON CONGRESS (SPort’s on GRill bar) | MySpace

Bumsted's - Bumsteds on 4th Tucson AZ

Cushing Street Bar -

No Anchovies - index

On A Roll - home

Maynards - Maynards - Kitchen » Welcome to Maynards Market and Kitchen in Tucson, Arizona!

Cafe Poca Cosa - Cafe Poca Cosa
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-25-2010, 06:25 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
3,391 posts, read 4,240,706 times
Reputation: 2024
Quote:
Originally Posted by cacto View Post
Phoenix, Tucson, Albuquerque, Santa Fe, El Paso, or ?
Albuquerque or Sante Fe, IMO. New Mexico ROCKS! Good weather, beautiful scenery, relatively decent cost of living. The state is on my "to do list."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-26-2010, 12:18 PM
940
 
13,789 posts, read 7,322,192 times
Reputation: 6869
Santa Fe...we're out there about every couple of months....and when the time comes to move out of the western Los Angeles area for good, we'll be heading to 5 acres in the eastern foothills overlooking Santa Fe at roughly 7000' in elevation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top