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Old 12-22-2009, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,701,367 times
Reputation: 7281

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Quote:
Originally Posted by eek View Post
as a nyer, i cannot for the life of me figure out where ppl got this notion of a "brooklyn accent."
son, we (ppl from queens and brooklyn) live on the same island. we (nyers in general) live in a relatively small area (geography wise), and we're all next door neighbors. its not possible for us to have different accents, according to borough. we are not isolated.

period.

i'm speaking about natives, not your friend that just moved 5 years ago or your parents from pakistan or whatever. we sound the same. to out of staters, we sound the same. i promise you.
the only exception would be *some* ppl in say manhattan because of the makeup of manhattan (being full of ppl that aren't originally from ny). and thats still not all of manhattan (washington heights, inwood, harlem, etc.).

anyway, our accent is the best in the country. yeah, i said it. everyone loves it. i fully expect someone to disagree with me. cool. fine. if you, you meaning americans, didn't love it then you wouldn't imitate it and you wouldn't emulate us.

the world loves us.
Actually it is possible. I even noticed the differences in the New York accents. I can tell the difference between a person from Brooklyn and Queens. The rest sounds the same to me.
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Old 12-22-2009, 11:08 AM
 
Location: Arlington, VA
182 posts, read 476,344 times
Reputation: 113
You are not alone, I love the accent too!! It's something I'm proud to have (although now living in northern VA for the past couple of years it's beginning to fade)!

I miss the way NYers pronounce names of Italian grocery items such as mozerell (dropping the a). Down here I always hear people at the grocery store ordering provolon-eee cheese.

Though some people may find the accent abrasive, obnoxious, and loud, I think it's ballsy and unique. Oh well, can't win every battle!
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Old 12-22-2009, 11:23 AM
eek
 
Location: Queens, NY
3,576 posts, read 6,660,165 times
Reputation: 1423
Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
Actually it is possible. I even noticed the differences in the New York accents. I can tell the difference between a person from Brooklyn and Queens. The rest sounds the same to me.
this would be like someone saying that a person from the western part of a city sound different than the person from the eastern part.

not state. not country. but city.

i don't see how this is possible at all. as a queens native, i don't hear a difference at all.

this would be like saying a person from the northern part of jersey city sounds different than a person from the southern part of jersey city.
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Old 12-22-2009, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
7,732 posts, read 12,160,992 times
Reputation: 2774
Quote:
Originally Posted by eek View Post
this would be like someone saying that a person from the western part of a city sound different than the person from the eastern part.

not state. not country. but city.

i don't see how this is possible at all. as a queens native, i don't hear a difference at all.

this would be like saying a person from the northern part of jersey city sounds different than a person from the southern part of jersey city.
Wrong. I can tell the difference between a Bronx accent and a Brooklyn accent. And there IS a difference, whether you admit it or not.
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Old 12-22-2009, 11:39 AM
eek
 
Location: Queens, NY
3,576 posts, read 6,660,165 times
Reputation: 1423
i say we get ppl from different boroughs to post audio of themselves speaking. i promise you that outside of ethnic background, which could contribute to the way a person communicates, there is no difference in accent.

this isn't nyc in 1920 when ppl didn't really leave their boroughs and everything was isolated.
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Old 12-22-2009, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
7,732 posts, read 12,160,992 times
Reputation: 2774
Quote:
Originally Posted by eek View Post
i say we get ppl from different boroughs to post audio of themselves speaking. i promise you that outside of ethnic background, which could contribute to the way a person communicates, there is no difference in accent.

this isn't nyc in 1920 when ppl didn't really leave their boroughs and everything was isolated.
Have you ever left the city? You almost come across like one of those people you mention from the 1920's.
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Old 12-22-2009, 12:24 PM
eek
 
Location: Queens, NY
3,576 posts, read 6,660,165 times
Reputation: 1423
i'm posting an audio response in about 30 min.
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Old 12-22-2009, 01:02 PM
eek
 
Location: Queens, NY
3,576 posts, read 6,660,165 times
Reputation: 1423

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5TUqwdLiKs
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Old 12-22-2009, 01:05 PM
 
Location: hopefully NYC one day :D
411 posts, read 1,053,058 times
Reputation: 187
Sorry, I haven't read the whole thread but I too love the NY accent! I thought I was the only one!
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Old 12-22-2009, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Historic Downtown Jersey City
2,705 posts, read 7,297,926 times
Reputation: 1196
There is a big misconception of NJ and it's accents. Fact is, most NJ residents do not have a detectable accent that most people think of when they think "NJ accent". That accent (think Sopranos) is so rare that you have to be within 10 miles or so of Manhattan to hear it even occasionally. That is a very, very small portion of NJ.

Furthermore, even within the region of NJ nearest to NYC, it tends to be only the over 45 age group who has a detectable NJ/NY accent. Younger people today, even in that region, do not typically exhibit the dropping of "r's" the way their parents' generation did.

Where I grew up in NJ (~15 miles from NYC) nobody had any sort of accent, other than a general suburban Northeastern tone and speed of speech. I can remember moving there as a kid (from NYC) and all the kids in school asking me why I talked so funny (I still had a NY accent at that point).

I always get a kick when somebody from out of the area visits NJ and says "the people don't really talk funny here". LOL. They almost sound disappointed.
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