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Old 12-28-2009, 11:00 AM
 
Location: St Paul, MN - NJ's Gold Coast
5,256 posts, read 11,956,143 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
At one time, Brooklynites were known for the "dems" and "dose" for "them" and "those". This was a descendant of the area's Dutch heritage, since there is no "th" sound in Dutch. I think that's pretty much extinct now.
You bring up a good point.
+1 rep

I don't know how many times I've tried explaining that the NY/NY/CT/MA accent derives from European immigration. You have NYers saying NJ developed the accent because of NY which is just plain ignorant because NJ too had massive immigration through Ellis island. Therefore the same cultures, traditions and LANGUAGE was spread through both the immediate NJ/NYC area.

Th Boston accent is due to large amounts immigrants who came from Ireland/Scotland just like the NYC/NJ area that accumulated the accent because of a lot immigrants coming from Italy. Hence why there's an distinct difference between Boston and NYC. (both regions did have a lot of both Italian/Irish and other immigrants, but the quantity of each is what defined NYC/NJ and Bostons accent )

Accents aren't developed out of random.
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Old 12-28-2009, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,000 posts, read 54,493,040 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BPerone201 View Post
You bring up a good point.
+1 rep

I don't know how many times I've tried explaining that the NY/NY/CT/MA accent derives from European immigration. You have NYers saying NJ developed the accent because of NY which is just plain ignorant because NJ too had massive immigration through Ellis island. Therefore the same cultures, traditions and LANGUAGE was spread through both the immediate NJ/NYC area.

Th Boston accent is due to large amounts immigrants who came from Ireland/Scotland just like the NYC/NJ area that accumulated the accent because of a lot immigrants coming from Italy. Hence why there's an distinct difference between Boston and NYC. (both regions did have a lot of both Italian/Irish and other immigrants, but the quantity of each is what defined NYC/NJ and Bostons accent )

Accents aren't developed out of random.
So true. I am of Dutch descent -- my ancestors settled in what is now Bergen County, NJ. The Dutch were also the original Europeans in what is now New York City (Sidebar: A good read about this is The Island At the Center of The World). Brooklyn is a corruption of the original Dutch name for the area, and throughout Bergen County and some other parts of NJ and New York State, you will find Dutch names and derivatives everywhere for towns and geographical features. And yes, some of the words entered the American English language and affected accents.
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Old 12-28-2009, 12:39 PM
 
Location: St Paul, MN - NJ's Gold Coast
5,256 posts, read 11,956,143 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
So true. I am of Dutch descent -- my ancestors settled in what is now Bergen County, NJ. The Dutch were also the original Europeans in what is now New York City (Sidebar: A good read about this is The Island At the Center of The World). Brooklyn is a corruption of the original Dutch name for the area, and throughout Bergen County and some other parts of NJ and New York State, you will find Dutch names and derivatives everywhere for towns and geographical features. And yes, some of the words entered the American English language and affected accents.
Of course!

New Amsterdam, the original New York.
The "Hudson" river isn't called the Hudson river for nothing (it was named after the Dutch captain who sailed to Manhattan)

I live in Bergen County BTW.
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Old 12-28-2009, 02:47 PM
eek
 
Location: Queens, NY
3,576 posts, read 6,651,818 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
At one time, Brooklynites were known for the "dems" and "dose" for "them" and "those". This was a descendant of the area's Dutch heritage, since there is no "th" sound in Dutch. I think that's pretty much extinct now.
that was at least like 60-70 years ago. a whole lot has changed since then. again, like i said in the vid, we are closer than ever as far as taking the train to whatever borough we want whatever time of the day we want, etc.

ppl interact more so it doesn't matter what kind of ethnic makeup your borough has. its not like a bunch of dutch ppl are enclosed in brooklyn without access to any place else.
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Old 12-28-2009, 04:37 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,130 posts, read 9,898,127 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BPerone201 View Post
Of course!

New Amsterdam, the original New York.
The "Hudson" river isn't called the Hudson river for nothing (it was named after the Dutch captain who sailed to Manhattan)

I live in Bergen County BTW.
Minor historical correction BP, Henry Hudson was a English sea captain not a Dutch one. Otherwise I agree with most of what you and Mightyqueen are saying.

Hudson sailed for the Dutch East Indies Company in some of his voyages, including his 1609 voyage exploring the Hudson River. 2009 is actually the 400th anniversary of his voyage.

Sadly on his very last voyage, to Hudson Bay, his crew threw him and his teenage son overboard and they were never seen again.
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Old 12-28-2009, 06:55 PM
 
Location: where my heart is
5,642 posts, read 7,964,931 times
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Not just Italian immigrants in NY, but Jewish immigrants have also made an impact on speech patterns in NY too.
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Old 12-30-2009, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
4,467 posts, read 8,435,132 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TANaples View Post
Not just Italian immigrants in NY, but Jewish immigrants have also made an impact on speech patterns in NY too.
True and the Irish
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Old 12-30-2009, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
4,467 posts, read 8,435,132 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TANaples View Post
but maybe some people think we should all sound like Fran Drescher or Tony Soprano?
Yeah that's true lol. People think all the people from NYC have talk like in the movies of the Mafia.
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Old 12-30-2009, 10:32 AM
 
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The NY accent is very popular on TV.

Tony Soprano, Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, etc. I like it too.
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Old 12-30-2009, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
4,467 posts, read 8,435,132 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dcrubin View Post
I was cursed with being born and raised in this cesspool called South Florida, and me and my family are moving to Queens. Being in South Florida, I met alot of New Yorkers, and my dad is from New Jersey so he had the accent slightly too. (He pronounces the r's but still says cawwfee and hot dawwwg)

All the New Yorkers I met, with the way they flow with the way they talk, it's just full of personality and completely catches your attention. The way NYCers talk completely matches their huge personalities. On this forum and in many other places, I keep hearing the accent getting smashed and called ugly again and again.

The southern accent I hear over hear from some of the native born Floridians is WAYYYYY more annoying than a New York accent.

Does anyone else agree that New York English is really underappreciated?

Look at Christopher Walken and Robert Deniro, the way they talk. Those are two individuals who know how to command their language.

We should all try to keep and preserve regional accents. If everyone spoke lame, generic General American, it would be a much more boring, stale country.

Diversity>>>>>monotony, that simple
Thank you for the insightful post. I agree also that the Southern accent is very annoying. Nope you are not alone. I love the NY accent as well. I believe that is the best accent.
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