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Old 07-10-2014, 08:43 PM
 
3,147 posts, read 2,941,429 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burrrrr View Post
Like who? News anchors come from all sorts of areas, like Washington DC, New York, Texas, etc.. they all tame their accents the same to sound general. No one scouts news anchors in Iowa.... Plus half of the people here are nasal anyway.

There is a more watered down upper-midwestern accent here in Iowa currently, but it is transitioning just like everywhere.. Places like Cleveland, etc sounded more like Iowa does now 50 years ago. The accents are becoming more polarized in the US.

Oh and for those of you commenting on Chicagoans - I don't think I saw anyone comment on the "lack" of the northern cities vowel shift in parts of DuPage county, specifically parts of Naperville, Elmhurst, Hinsdale, etc. More affluent caucasians in DuPage county talk more "general american" ... but it has more of a classy sophisticated sound to it, it's kind of a nice change, very educated and polite. However when you go to a suburb like Orland Park in the south, it is actually a much stronger vowel shift than say somewhere in the northern suburbs like Arlington Heights. Just my observations, tons of exceptions of course.
Ok, I am wrong, I didn't hear it somewhere.... geesh.

Oh and as someone who grew up in Iowa and traveled to the upper midwest often, I COMPLETELY disagree about the "watered down upper-midwest accent" except for maybe the furthest north reaches of the state.
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Old 07-10-2014, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Cedar Rapids
233 posts, read 281,347 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xander_Crews View Post
Oh and as someone who grew up in Iowa and traveled to the upper midwest often, I COMPLETELY disagree about the "watered down upper-midwest accent" except for maybe the furthest north reaches of the state.
It can be hit or miss, I have family of German descent in rural Cedar and Muscatine county who can sound pretty nasally and Northern with their words. My family from Cedar Rapids who is of Czech descent sound very northern as well. And finally when I was living in the Waterloo area, I heard it a lot too - and that's not that far North. I think it tends to be further east in the state.

Is it as strong as say, the state of Michigan, or Milwaukee? No, but it's there, and can be found as far south as St. Louis.
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Old 07-10-2014, 10:56 PM
 
3,147 posts, read 2,941,429 times
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Ha! I looked it up, and I am not full of it!

General American Accent
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Quote:
General American (GA) is a major accent of American English and, particularly, the American accent considered the most lacking in regional characteristics.
Quote:
General American, like British Received Pronunciation (RP) and most prestige accent varieties of many other societies, has never been the accent of the entire nation. However, it has become widely spoken in many American films, TV series, national news, commercial ads, and American radio broadcasts
Quote:
The General American accent is most closely related to a generalized Midwestern accent and is spoken particularly by many newscasters.

Map of local accent closest to General American:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...erican.svg.png

Last edited by Xander_Crews; 07-10-2014 at 11:16 PM..
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Old 07-11-2014, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Cedar Rapids
233 posts, read 281,347 times
Reputation: 224
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xander_Crews View Post
Ha! I looked it up, and I am not full of it!
No, you are not full of it, and I never said you were. "General American" or North Midland, is definitely prevalent in the state of Iowa - see the area with yellow stripes on my first map. However, from about the lower center of the state, and north, there is an overlap into a more Northern dialect, and stronger in the east. This covers the most populated areas of the state, however not ALL areas. So it would be entirely possible to live in Iowa your whole life and never encounter it, depending on where you were to travel, or who you were to talk to. Here are a few maps that show the vowel shift to the East, as well as the Western Northern accent in the northern half of the state. Wasn't trying to start a war with ya ... but I'll fire these missiles back anyway.





You can see that there are three predominant dialects spoken in our state - and then the majority of the area where the three are converging on one another - they are: The North Midland (Similar to central IL, IN, NE) or "General American", The Western North (similar to SD, MN) - however NOT Northwoods what so ever like Fargo, and then traits of the Inland North (or Northern Cities Vowel Shift) which is part of the spreading dialect from the Chicago area, Great Lakes, etc. Since it is a vowel transition it can be found at different stages in different individuals. I have a lot of family in the "lobe" that it covers - so that is probably why you and I have differing viewpoints on accents in Iowa, interesting isn't it? I also have family in the far southern part of the state speaking Midland and I've paid attention to the differences for a very long time.

Last edited by burrrrr; 07-11-2014 at 09:01 AM..
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Old 07-11-2014, 10:09 AM
 
3,147 posts, read 2,941,429 times
Reputation: 1858
Quote:
Originally Posted by burrrrr View Post
Wasn't trying to start a war with ya ... but I'll fire these missiles back anyway.

Ugh.

You took issue with me stating that I had heard somewhere that station programmers like newscasters with a GA accent. As you can see in the map I provided, the GA accent, when you look at localities is completely centered in Iowa, covers most of the state and barely any of other states.

And, according to Wikipedia:

Quote:
The General American accent is most closely related to a generalized Midwestern accent and is spoken particularly by many newscasters.
I am not interested in ANY war over accents.
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