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Old 01-26-2011, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Chicago metro
3,510 posts, read 7,322,950 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by j_cat View Post
As awkward as it is to have "segregated" discussions, that's really what you need to do when talking about accents. Because the reality is, in fact, quite segregated. White accent distributions and black accent distributions are two completely different subjects. The black accents have a single point of origin (the South), whereas the white accents do not.
Agreed. Black Chicagoans in general talk different from White Chicagoans. In California, the gap is not as great among different races and ethnic groups. What I notice is Black Californians actually pronounce their "r's".
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Old 01-26-2011, 12:56 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
1,472 posts, read 3,024,245 times
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No, I don't care for it (the stereotypical Great Lakes/Fargo type accents). The younger people (especially female) in California are starting to pick up that nasally "a" that's so prevalent in the Northern Midwest. Almost an "eeah" sound when they say words like "thanks" or "can". Like fingernails on a chalkboard and I don't know why they do it now vs. not doing it 20-30 years ago. Damn vowel shifts.
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Old 01-26-2011, 01:08 PM
 
Location: NC/IL/MI
3,625 posts, read 7,177,370 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicagoland60426 View Post
Agreed. Black Chicagoans in general talk different from White Chicagoans. In California, the gap is not as great among different races and ethnic groups. What I notice is Black Californians actually pronounce their "r's".
Quote:
Originally Posted by j_cat View Post
As awkward as it is to have "segregated" discussions, that's really what you need to do when talking about accents. Because the reality is, in fact, quite segregated. White accent distributions and black accent distributions are two completely different subjects. The black accents have a single point of origin (the South), whereas the white accents do not.
I noticed that, especially on this site, alot of people would say something like..... "Chicagoans or Detroiters sound southern" and then the next person would disagree.


I think its funny tho.
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Old 01-26-2011, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,577,680 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicagoland60426 View Post
Agreed. Black Chicagoans in general talk different from White Chicagoans. In California, the gap is not as great among different races and ethnic groups. What I notice is Black Californians actually pronounce their "r's".
You can't use Chicago as an example of the entire nation. Many blacks from the northeast, especially New York and Boston, have deep roots in those cities and have accents identical to their white neighbors. Many black Minnesotans sound Minnesotan, especially those of recent African background. The Great Lakes area (Chicago, Michigan, Ohio, St. Louis, Upstate NY) is the exception, not the rule, and even there, you can find a few blacks speaking with the "white" accent (and vice versa).
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Old 01-26-2011, 07:00 PM
 
Location: Ohio
411 posts, read 981,967 times
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Default until i joined city-data

Until I started participating in city-data, I never knew that people from one part of the United States had such a problem with hearing people from other parts of the U.S. speak! Yes, I can hear regional accents, but they never bothered me. I never even THOUGHT about being bothered by them!
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Old 01-26-2011, 07:40 PM
 
Location: St. Joseph Area
6,237 posts, read 8,469,958 times
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Midwesterners as a whole have a different sound than other people from the North, I've noticed. I never noticed it until I moved to the South, but after meeting so many people from Upstate New York and New England down here, there's definitely a subtle difference. It's a little more nasally, the vowels are a little flatter. It's slight, but I notice it.

Of course, my students claimed that i had a "Northern Accent." I had to explain to them that there are different kinds of "North"

I like the accent myself. I find it endearing and quaint, for some reason. Maybe because I grew up around it.
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Old 01-26-2011, 07:53 PM
 
3,644 posts, read 9,012,935 times
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like any accent, it depends on who's speaking. It can sound good or bad. Both of these women are from St. Louis, but I think the 2nd one has a better sounding accent, maybe it's because she looks better, haha.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VSD84BcaNcs


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V_m3mJezKWc

The first one sounds very Northern to me with occasional Southern sounds, oddly enough. The second has a more neutral accent, but not completely.
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Old 01-26-2011, 08:06 PM
 
Location: NE Kansas City, MO
201 posts, read 408,653 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Yes, I find them physically arousing.
You too?!
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Old 01-26-2011, 08:27 PM
 
1,495 posts, read 1,949,655 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kazoopilot View Post
Many blacks from the northeast, especially New York and Boston, have deep roots in those cities and have accents identical to their white neighbors.
"Whah" do "ah" doubt that? <<Those are black pronunciations throughout the country, white pronunciations only in the South.

You are correct about Africans, Caribbeans, and some affluent African-Americans; all are exceptions to the rule.
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Old 01-26-2011, 10:19 PM
 
871 posts, read 1,958,741 times
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i dont particularly care for them, especially the nasally chicago variety. i find myself cringing when i hear "have" pronounced "hee-ave". the "big" pronounced "beg" thing doesnt really bother me though.

but of all american dialects that i know of, its one of two that i dislike, second only to the "valley girl" speech pattern (which is found in every region).

but a lot of people ive met from the midwest dont talk that way, and speak more neutral and TV show-like.
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