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Old 01-28-2011, 08:08 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
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I wasn't talking about people in the Twin Cities, I meant those from outstate Minnesota. Also, children of Africans, born and raised in MN, tend to not have accents. Also, I've only heard the "Mississippi/Arkansas" accent from transplants from those states or Chicago, Detroit or Gary. I've never heard a native Minnesotan speak that way (not saying they don't exist, just saying I haven't heard it).

Also, I don't think I've heard someone else refer to a black person as a "Minnesotan" before. It makes sense to call anyone who lives in Minnesota "minnesotan" (I do), but I think most associate that term with white Scandinavian or German residents of MN.
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Old 01-28-2011, 09:54 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
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I can't say I like them. It is hard for me to listen to them sometimes... the very nasal... Pronouncing. o's like a's really bothers me... It is a shrill noise.

i.e. citydata. COM would be pronounced citydata. caaahm. Bob = Baahb. etc.

a real a word sounds like it might have a Y in it like yaaack.

or keenOsha wiscaahnsin heard blaring loud on the UPN Metra...makes my ears want to bleed.

no offense... but no I don't like them.

Generally most people in Chicago don't have them. but every once in awhile it will be VERY strong.

sounds like a sheep going baaa baaaa baaaaa

especially if its thrown in with a bunch of "ya knows" throughout the speech which is very common and used instead of "um"
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Old 01-28-2011, 09:58 PM
 
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^ i think most people in Chicago probably do have that accent, you just don't notice it. I even hear it in St. Louis. People say "maahm" for "mom" so I'm pretty sure Chicago would have it too
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Old 01-28-2011, 10:08 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
^ i think most people in Chicago probably do have that accent, you just don't notice it. I even hear it in St. Louis. People say "maahm" for "mom" so I'm pretty sure Chicago would have it too
Oh I notice it, I'm not from here... Some are just MUCH stronger as to be shrill. Others the accent is there but it isn't so strong, more neutral and only noticeable on certain words... The strong accent is noticeable on almost every word is accent shifted and some words almost not able to understand.
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Old 01-28-2011, 10:22 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
^ i think most people in Chicago probably do have that accent, you just don't notice it. I even hear it in St. Louis. People say "maahm" for "mom" so I'm pretty sure Chicago would have it too
I don't see how else you'd pronounce mom. Of course, I'm from the Midwest.
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Old 01-28-2011, 10:25 PM
 
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Originally Posted by kazoopilot View Post
I don't see how else you'd pronounce mom. Of course, I'm from the Midwest.
Mom | Define Mom at Dictionary.com
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Old 01-28-2011, 10:27 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grapico View Post
Oh I notice it, I'm not from here... Some are just MUCH stronger as to be shrill. Others the accent is there but it isn't so strong, more neutral and only noticeable on certain words... The strong accent is noticeable on almost every word is accent shifted and some words almost not able to understand.
You're from the south, right? There's a real accent down there. Most Midwesterners don't talk like Chicagoans. You won't hear that accent in Minnesota, the Dakotas, etc. Maybe a little bit in the Twin Cities, but it's not as extreme as Chicago and doesn't exist elsewhere in the state.
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Old 01-29-2011, 04:26 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grapico View Post
Oh I notice it, I'm not from here... Some are just MUCH stronger as to be shrill. Others the accent is there but it isn't so strong, more neutral and only noticeable on certain words... The strong accent is noticeable on almost every word is accent shifted and some words almost not able to understand.
The announcement "Bron Line Train to Donton" was something I noticed right away. Also the road by the river is "W-yecker."

Obviously the word Chicago sometimes rhymes with shadow (flat A instead of broad A), and yet people do the opposite for Halsted (broad A where I would expect flat A).

I actually like the accents here better than most other accents, though there a few things I could do without hearing (some people are a bit heavy on their their o's as in "Chicagooo").

And for the record I'm from Arizona, so I am totally neutral and objective in how I hear things. (just kidding, I know the "normal" accent is also an accent)
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Old 01-29-2011, 07:05 AM
 
787 posts, read 1,468,729 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kazoopilot View Post
I wasn't talking about people in the Twin Cities, I meant those from outstate Minnesota. Also, children of Africans, born and raised in MN, tend to not have accents. Also, I've only heard the "Mississippi/Arkansas" accent from transplants from those states or Chicago, Detroit or Gary. I've never heard a native Minnesotan speak that way (not saying they don't exist, just saying I haven't heard it).

Also, I don't think I've heard someone else refer to a black person as a "Minnesotan" before. It makes sense to call anyone who lives in Minnesota "minnesotan" (I do), but I think most associate that term with white Scandinavian or German residents of MN.

The vast majority of minorities live in the Twin Cities. I disagree, African kids definitely have accents that are influenced by their parents' accents, and often, the urban communities they live in (MPLS, STP, parts of the "Brooklyns"). I am speaking from experience on this one. The accents in these partially African-American communities are influenced by African-American speech, which has its roots in the South. Not every black person in MN is African and straight off the boat or directly from Chicago. African Americans have been in the state for quite some time now (over one hundred years), and still largely retain a distinct way of speaking. Go to Saint Paul: most AAs you see there are Minnesota natives, unlike MPLS and some suburbs,

And it's 2011. Minnesotans come in all colors. There are Hmong, Liberian, African-American, Ecuadorian, Vietnamese, Mexican, Somalian, Nigerian, Ethiopian, Thai etc. Minnesotans. Not only white people can claim that title anymore.
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Old 01-29-2011, 12:41 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,391 posts, read 24,567,618 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by j_cat View Post
The announcement "Bron Line Train to Donton" was something I noticed right away. Also the road by the river is "W-yecker."

Obviously the word Chicago sometimes rhymes with shadow (flat A instead of broad A), and yet people do the opposite for Halsted (broad A where I would expect flat A).

I actually like the accents here better than most other accents, though there a few things I could do without hearing (some people are a bit heavy on their their o's as in "Chicagooo").

And for the record I'm from Arizona, so I am totally neutral and objective in how I hear things. (just kidding, I know the "normal" accent is also an accent)
I'm from FL home of transplants and have also lived abroad and in CA. I have a pretty neutral accent and have been called "monotone". I'm actually really careful about my accent and take it pretty seriously to pronunciate properly.

If you are somewhere for awhile you pick up on some accents though. I remember I stayed one summer in PA and started picking up the accent.

Yes things like wacker or back or seem to have a "Y" thrown in curving the a.

I like African English (not South African)... a bit like British but not as strong and sounds extremely proper.

^^ Yes there is a southern accent in FL but it is not as strong. When I go back there people do not think I am from there, I had this lady at starbucks ask me where I was from last time I was there.

The accent in Iowa/Nebraska is supposed to be pretty neutral right? It certainly isn't the nasal accent I hear in Chicago.
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