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Old 09-02-2010, 10:29 PM
 
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That PN should have been PA. Suppose my theory applies to upstate NY as well will lots of small cities. But did NY have the rural industrial you see in the south?
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Old 09-03-2010, 03:14 AM
 
Location: SW Pennsylvania
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Originally Posted by west336 View Post
I'm surprised because I always associated PA with its big, industrial and urban cities like Pittsburgh or Philly.....not the rural farms or Appalachia America.
With Pittsburgh at one end and Philadelphia at the other, the center of Pennsylvania is mainly rural with small towns to medium sized cities.

The county I live in, Washington, has over 200,000 residents but is mainly made up of small communities and rural areas. It is a part of Pittsburgh Metro area, but the county is heavily wooded and hilly in parts.

Also PA was once a major coal mining state and suffered drastic population declines in its coal counties, reflecting a trend in Appalachia.

PA is also home to a significant Amish population who live a rural lifestyle.
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Old 09-03-2010, 09:09 AM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
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Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
I think many people are surprised by the dichotomy of the NE, yes the huge cities on the coast then large and wide (not extremely tall) with some beautiful contryside just oustside the populated swath. Seriously from most of these cities within a little over an hout you can be in pastoral mountainouse settings or wine country, beautiful lakes, bays, and some of the most fertile growing areas in the world.
I don't know why anyone would be surprised by that, well then again a lot of people only fly to cities, I like road trips. Driving out to WV is so beautiful
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Old 09-03-2010, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
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Originally Posted by west336 View Post
I'm surprised because I always associated PA with its big, industrial and urban cities like Pittsburgh or Philly.....not the rural farms or Appalachia America.
yeah but those cities occupy less than 20% of a very sizable state. What did you think was in between?
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Old 09-03-2010, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
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The slow down is only temporary due mostly to the banking crisis and it's effect on real estate development. Business's would be crazy to steer away from the more abudant land and resources of the South. It's a logical choice. If American business' do stop coming foreign companies will step in and take advantage.

It's just good business for development to take place in the South. It would be foolish of the United States to not keep developing. It's like if you had abundant prime real estate right next to your built on lot and you were ready to build additional homes for your growing extended family but you decide to add a third and fourth floor to your existing house and not touch your undeveloped land.
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Old 09-03-2010, 01:21 PM
 
Location: Hernando, FL
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High energy prices don't help either. Folks start opening their electric bills and see 4 or $500 and all the sudden vaulted ceilings and palm trees aren't paradise anymore.
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Old 09-03-2010, 08:21 PM
 
1,250 posts, read 2,118,025 times
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Originally Posted by 1coolcustomer View Post
High energy prices don't help either. Folks start opening their electric bills and see 4 or $500 and all the sudden vaulted ceilings and palm trees aren't paradise anymore.
I have seen what some people have done with vaulted ceilings if they are high enough is to make a new room in the space. One reason is to not have to clean such places and can add floorspace cheaply compared to other methods.
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Old 09-09-2010, 12:36 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
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Originally Posted by imperialmog View Post
I have seen what some people have done with vaulted ceilings if they are high enough is to make a new room in the space. One reason is to not have to clean such places and can add floorspace cheaply compared to other methods.
When I lived in South Georgia we had palm trees and some had vaulted ceilings but our winter heating bill was alot higher than the summer cooling bill.
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Old 09-09-2010, 02:00 PM
 
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Originally Posted by creeksitter View Post
That PN should have been PA. Suppose my theory applies to upstate NY as well will lots of small cities. But did NY have the rural industrial you see in the south?
Yes, parts of Upstate NY have or had paper mills, iron ore mines, various mills of all kinds, power plants, as well as large apple orchards, onion farms and vineyards that attracted European/Canadian immigrants and Blacks from the South to some of these jobs.
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Old 09-27-2010, 12:43 AM
 
Location: Carrboro and Concord, NC
964 posts, read 2,047,369 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Galounger View Post
The slow down is only temporary due mostly to the banking crisis and it's effect on real estate development. Business's would be crazy to steer away from the more abudant land and resources of the South. It's a logical choice. If American business' do stop coming foreign companies will step in and take advantage.

It's just good business for development to take place in the South. It would be foolish of the United States to not keep developing. It's like if you had abundant prime real estate right next to your built on lot and you were ready to build additional homes for your growing extended family but you decide to add a third and fourth floor to your existing house and not touch your undeveloped land.
Growth in parts of the Sunbelt will certainly pick back up. Perhaps not at the levels seen over the last 20 years, because I think The Great Recession is the birth of a new normal. But in some places yes, and no:

1. The places that are almost entirely products of real estate speculation, tourists, retirees, various kinds of low-level service work, and construction are in deep trouble. Much of Florida, not all of it. Phoenix and Vegas.

2. In the novel Crying Of Lot 49, Thomas Pynchon described the fictional city of San Narciso as (I'm paraphrasing) less anything readily identifiable as a city, but rather a grouping of concepts: census tracts, zoning areas, special-purpose bond issue districts, each with its' own freeway, with access roads complete with flyovers into the parking lot of their very own shopping mall. In other words, cities that may have a few hundred thousand people, but they didn't exist 30 years ago. They have no function or purpose beyond landscaping and some sort of lifestyle concept. Florida and California have tons of them, and in 50 years, they all will be Detroit with palm trees.

3. Look at the cities and urban areas that are doing ok during the recession: Austin, Atlanta, Raleigh-Durham, NoVA. The all boast rates of educational attainment that are higher than their state, regional or national averages, and this is what sets them apart, even within the Sunbelt. It's part of why you see more venture capital in those areas (way, way ahead of other cities in the SE and S), start-up activity in most of them, patents, scientific r&d, and emerging industry/technology. And in some of those areas: Austin, Raleigh-Durham, NoVA, and maybe Huntsville the focus is less on the manufacturing and marketing side of things, but the research and development side. There is notably less of a fixation with luring in outside businesses/plants/industries with incentives, and a very strong focus on deepening the home-grown talent pool, and as part of that, the networking activity in those metros is phenomenal, and what you see in the business section of the paper is just the tip of the iceberg. This kind of orientation in the local business culture is praised by some, and mocked by others, but the results speak for themselves, and because of it, in those cities this recession will be a lot more of a blip than it will be in most of the country.

4, As for Charlotte, it hasn't done quite as well over the recession, but there is more to Charlotte than banking; there's an emerging energy sector there. The financial services side of the economy dominates, and has taken some huge hits, but the financial services side of Charlotte is colossal. Really, really colossal. And I think that industry - there - is sloughing off a lot of dead weight, but will continue to be a strong presence there. And if - in the past - the prominence of that industry there attracted a good bit of spin-off industry, that will not stop. Charlotte's population has shot past 700,000 within the last 18 months, and estimates suggest that it's at least 10K beyond that now.

5. The wild card that could change everything? Water availability. The Rust Belt states (some of them) have direct access to the largest supply of un-frozen fresh water in the world. They are increasingly protective of it. It's becoming a commodity elsewhere. The western end of the Sunbelt is used to droughts, but population growth has deccimated the resources it does have (like the Colorado River); some of those cities were basically built around the theft of someone else's water.

The Southeastern end of the Sunbelt is not used to droughts, but they have been becoming more frequent, and there is historical evidence that very extreme droughts (far beyond anything seen in the 19th or 20th century) have happened before in the region (Southeast, and Mid Atlantic), and are certainly possible again in the future.
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