U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-29-2010, 09:21 AM
 
Location: where my heart is
5,642 posts, read 7,973,190 times
Reputation: 1661

Advertisements

Texas seems to have the best economy of all the southern states. That alone should attract people to it as opposed to the other states.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-29-2010, 02:20 PM
 
1,250 posts, read 2,118,025 times
Reputation: 279
I am thinking that the growth will mainly start shifting to new areas. The place I am thinking as new areas not thought of much in the past will be in South Carolina and Tennessee with possibly a couple of places in Alabama near the end of this decade. Texas will still grow well for another 10-20 years but likely slow down then due to crowding and possibly COL starts rising fast which might be related to it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-29-2010, 04:16 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,333,660 times
Reputation: 2698
Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
This makes sense, i could see areas like Charlotte and RDU getting some more growth as they have more room to scale and NC does a pretty good job attracting businesses.
Actually I meant even smaller, like Charleston, Baton Rogue, Wilmington, Chattanooga, NW Arkansas, etc. Charlotte and RDU have been in the spotlight for growth for a little while now and will continue to post relatively high rates, IMO.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-31-2010, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Jonesboro
3,266 posts, read 3,249,615 times
Reputation: 3697
I don't have enough time to get into a full reply here today but someone asked for a link to the news from the Atlanta Regional Commission that referenced the sharp growth slowdown in the 10 core counties of the metro area.
Bear in mind that the census bureau recognizes 27 or so counties to be in the metro area based upon commuting patterns. The 10 counties contain some 4.2 million residents out of the approximately 5.7 mililion that reside in the entire Atlanta metro.
Someone turned off the people faucet: Metro Atlanta population growth slows to trickle unseen since the 1950s | Political Insider
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-01-2010, 07:15 AM
 
56,637 posts, read 80,952,685 times
Reputation: 12518
Quote:
Originally Posted by imperialmog View Post
I am thinking that the growth will mainly start shifting to new areas. The place I am thinking as new areas not thought of much in the past will be in South Carolina and Tennessee with possibly a couple of places in Alabama near the end of this decade. Texas will still grow well for another 10-20 years but likely slow down then due to crowding and possibly COL starts rising fast which might be related to it.
Actually, parts of those states have seen some good growth(Upstate SC and the Knoxville, Chattanooga and Nashville/Middle TN metros of TN). Huntsville, Mobile and the Auburn-Opelika areas of AL have seen some good growth too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-01-2010, 02:01 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,333,660 times
Reputation: 2698
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Actually, parts of those states have seen some good growth(Upstate SC and the Knoxville, Chattanooga and Nashville/Middle TN metros of TN).
You've also got Myrtle Beach, Charleston, and Columbia in SC (which are actually growing faster than the Upstate, which posts a solid growth rate as well). I'm putting my money on Charleston to be the one that booms a la Charlotte, Raleigh, etc. in SC.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-01-2010, 02:15 PM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,096 posts, read 35,052,903 times
Reputation: 15281
Quote:
Originally Posted by atler8 View Post
I don't have enough time to get into a full reply here today but someone asked for a link to the news from the Atlanta Regional Commission that referenced the sharp growth slowdown in the 10 core counties of the metro area.
Bear in mind that the census bureau recognizes 27 or so counties to be in the metro area based upon commuting patterns. The 10 counties contain some 4.2 million residents out of the approximately 5.7 mililion that reside in the entire Atlanta metro.
Someone turned off the people faucet: Metro Atlanta population growth slows to trickle unseen since the 1950s | Political Insider
No surprises here. The current state of economy is causing large numbers of potential residents to defer their plans. But I have to laugh at some of the posters who believe that a growth trend that has endured 150 years is suddenly going to reverse itself. I certainly have no concrete reason to believe it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-01-2010, 02:52 PM
205
 
274 posts, read 294,352 times
Reputation: 425
"Huntsville, Mobile and the Auburn-Opelika areas of AL have seen some good growth too."

Tuscaloosa has as well especially in the last 6 years from 83,000 to over 93,000. The city itself has grown by 15% in that time period. Mobile, the city, hasn't really grown any but neighboring Baldwin County is growing like a weed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-01-2010, 04:34 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,223 posts, read 17,966,293 times
Reputation: 14668
Quote:
Originally Posted by LovinDecatur View Post
No surprises here. The current state of economy is causing large numbers of potential residents to defer their plans. But I have to laugh at some of the posters who believe that a growth trend that has endured 150 years is suddenly going to reverse itself. I certainly have no concrete reason to believe it.
Between 1900 and 1950, the Northeast and Midwest had explosive population growth. If the rate of population growth can slow down in the Northeast and the Midwest, then it can slow down in the South too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-01-2010, 06:49 PM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,096 posts, read 35,052,903 times
Reputation: 15281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
Between 1900 and 1950, the Northeast and Midwest had explosive population growth. If the rate of population growth can slow down in the Northeast and the Midwest, then it can slow down in the South too.
If you read carefully, you will see that I was referring to a reversal of migration trends, not a slowdown (which is bound to happen anywhere). I really don't see a reverse migration from the South and West to the North and East in the foreseeable future, and certainly nothing on the scale of the exodus to the Sunbelt that has taken place over the last 50 years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top