U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 01-03-2010, 02:37 PM
 
981 posts, read 633,348 times
Reputation: 215

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by DinsdalePirahna View Post
You are right. So how can NY and CA be insular as jjacobeclark claims?
I have no idea. Perhaps jj just had a different conception of "insular."

 
Old 01-03-2010, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Lower East Side, Milwaukee, WI
2,945 posts, read 4,146,935 times
Reputation: 1113
Quote:
Originally Posted by DinsdalePirahna View Post
Probably the Raw Natural Beauty, The mountains, the Lakes, the Rivers, The Oceans. The People. The Excitement.
LOL. Right. The East and West Coasts couldn't be more different. California and the PNW were there own separate continents at one time and they slammed into North America, creating the rugged Pacific Coastline and several mountain ranges like the Sierras and the Cascades. The East Coast, on the other hand, has a gentle coastline and all of the mountains are far away from the big coastal cities where the majority of people actually live.

The highest point between the Rockies and the Alps is in South Dakota. The Great Lakes are lined with thousands of beaches. Michigan has more water frontage than any state with the exception of Alaska. Minnesota is home to over 10,000 lakes. Most of the nation's major rivers (Mississippi, Illinois, Ohio, Missouri, Wisconsin, etc.) pass through the states of the Midwest. More rivers pass through Nebraska than any other state. These arguments hold no water, you guys need to come up with some more original stuff.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DinsdalePirahna View Post
Saint Louis is fine if you like the Midwest. I've lived here Since Summer 2008. I just don't like it.

You have no idea what insularity is. Every where I've been in NY and Ca have welcomed people from out of state. - JUST AN EXAMPLE: The ad agency I used to work for had only two CA Natives (one being the owner).

The locals around here use the phrase as "What High School did you go to" as a way to establish your social status.

I've lived in many places and have never seen anything like this area.
First of all, you don't live in St. Louis, you live 40 miles away. Do you really think I couldn't go to small towns in Upstate NY or Northern NJ and find people who are exactly the same?

Second, of course states like California are going to have more transplants than natives; the state has doubled in size in the last 20 years. Everywhere out west and in the Sunbelt is going to have a ton of transplants.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DinsdalePirahna View Post
You are right. So how can NY and CA be insular as jjacobeclark claims?
Why are you asking him? If you read the post I said NATIVES from those states are insular.
 
Old 01-03-2010, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Lower East Side, Milwaukee, WI
2,945 posts, read 4,146,935 times
Reputation: 1113
Quote:
Originally Posted by justcause View Post
I have no idea. Perhaps jj just had a different conception of "insular."
Main Entry: inĚsuĚlar
Pronunciation: \ˈin(t)-su̇-lər, -syu̇-, ˈin-shə-lər\
Function: adjective
Etymology: Late Latin insularis, from Latin insula island
Date: 1611

1 a : of, relating to, or constituting an island b : dwelling or situated on an island <insular residents>
2 : characteristic of an isolated people; especially : being, having, or reflecting a narrow provincial viewpoint
3 : of or relating to an island of cells or tissue
 
Old 01-03-2010, 05:20 PM
 
981 posts, read 633,348 times
Reputation: 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjacobeclark View Post
Main Entry: inĚsuĚlar
Pronunciation: \ˈin(t)-su̇-lər, -syu̇-, ˈin-shə-lər\
Function: adjective
Etymology: Late Latin insularis, from Latin insula island
Date: 1611

1 a : of, relating to, or constituting an island b : dwelling or situated on an island <insular residents>
2 : characteristic of an isolated people; especially : being, having, or reflecting a narrow provincial viewpoint
3 : of or relating to an island of cells or tissue
Why are you giving me definitions? I know what insular means. I was just suggesting that you didn't in the context it was used.
 
Old 01-03-2010, 06:01 PM
 
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
5,847 posts, read 11,015,870 times
Reputation: 3829
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjacobeclark View Post
Main Entry: inĚsuĚlar
Pronunciation: \ˈin(t)-su̇-lər, -syu̇-, ˈin-shə-lər\
Function: adjective
Etymology: Late Latin insularis, from Latin insula island
Date: 1611

1 a : of, relating to, or constituting an island b : dwelling or situated on an island <insular residents>
2 : characteristic of an isolated people; especially : being, having, or reflecting a narrow provincial viewpoint
3 : of or relating to an island of cells or tissue
Sounds just like Saint Louis.

This area is so provincial that they refuse to accept the outer burbs as a part of the Metro Area (as you have indicated in your other posts that I live 40 miles away - Hell I can do 40 miles on Bicycle)

And BTW if you have ever lived in NY and CA, a thirty mile commute is nothing. I really think the big cities scared you.
 
Old 01-03-2010, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
1,572 posts, read 2,530,172 times
Reputation: 1885
Detroit, New Orleans, Phoenix
 
Old 01-03-2010, 06:52 PM
 
Location: Houston, Tx
839 posts, read 2,538,470 times
Reputation: 704
Smile Phoenix is really boring!!

The only thing to do in Phoenix is work (If you are lucky enough to have a job) and go home ( if you have a home). Everything else is just hurrying up to get from one air conditioned environment to another air conditioned environment. IT IS A VERY BORING PLACE.
 
Old 01-03-2010, 07:13 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,562,228 times
Reputation: 3232
I agree with you guys on Phoenix. I also have to add Miami - I just don't like hot weather.
 
Old 01-03-2010, 08:38 PM
 
Location: STL
1,124 posts, read 3,225,312 times
Reputation: 575
I know this sounds cliche, but: I would never want to live in the city of Detroit.
 
Old 01-03-2010, 08:49 PM
 
Location: St Louis
1,117 posts, read 2,591,185 times
Reputation: 363
Quote:
Originally Posted by DinsdalePirahna View Post
Sounds just like Saint Louis.

This area is so provincial that they refuse to accept the outer burbs as a part of the Metro Area (as you have indicated in your other posts that I live 40 miles away - Hell I can do 40 miles on Bicycle)

And BTW if you have ever lived in NY and CA, a thirty mile commute is nothing. I really think the big cities scared you.
Sounds like somones company has trouble attracting busness in STL. Blame the owner not the region.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

ę 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top