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Old 12-31-2009, 07:59 AM
 
Location: Northern Illinois via Northern Ohio
423 posts, read 631,998 times
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I grew up near a small town [north central Ohio] and I enjoyed it. However, I'm sure where I'm from isn't typical for the average American small town.....amusement park, numerous waterparks, islands, beaches, wineries, Amish country, lots of touristy-things etc. were the norm. Add the fact that downtown Cleveland, Toledo, or Columbus were no more than an hour away for the big city fix; I was happy living my first 23 years of my life there.
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Old 12-31-2009, 08:06 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,138 posts, read 22,079,631 times
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Lived in tiny towns, small towns, small cities and large cities, as well as out in the country. Personally I like the country the best, but next best is tiny-small towns. While it is nice having a lot of things close in a large city, they also really don't figure into most peoples daily lives either. It isn't like most people go to shows, concerts, fine dining, etc... every day, or even once a month.

I can have all of that with just a short drive whenever I want it, but don't have to deal with; traffic, crime, crowds, bus schedules, taxi's, and all the other negatives of living in a largely populated area everyday either. I can have the quiet streets, neighborhood's where kids still walk to friends houses and ride their bikes ANYWHERE in town (or ride their bikes into town without worry. Schools that your child doesn't have to be exceptional to be known by the entire school staff. I'm not talking about a suburb that borders other suburb's or the city itself either, but a true small town where it is a drive (short or long) in any direction to get to the next town, through farmland or woodland.

Nothing wrong with loving a big city, for some it is where they thrive and come alive. But why a lot that live in large cities have to vilify country or small town living is beyond me. Some of us love stepping out of our front door and not having a lot of people around. Laying down at night and the loudest thing you hear is the fish tank filter a couple of rooms away, no cars, trucks, people, sirens, etc.... For a lot of us the big cities are not vibrant, instead they are non-stop chaos.
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Old 12-31-2009, 08:10 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,138 posts, read 22,079,631 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sandwalk View Post
I grew up near a small town [north central Ohio] and I enjoyed it. However, I'm sure where I'm from isn't typical for the average American small town.....amusement park, numerous waterparks, islands, beaches, wineries, Amish country, lots of touristy-things etc. were the norm. Add the fact that downtown Cleveland, Toledo, or Columbus were no more than an hour away for the big city fix; I was happy living my first 23 years of my life there.
Must have been around Sandusky. Nope, not typical of small towns, but not all that different once you are just a tiny bit away from the nut-house that makes up Cedar Point. I really like that area (which is saying a LOT coming from a Michigan native about ANYPLACE in Ohio. ).
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Old 12-31-2009, 08:15 AM
 
1,712 posts, read 1,912,763 times
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Either or....

It is all good to me and I can be happy in a small town or big city
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Old 12-31-2009, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
7,732 posts, read 7,321,890 times
Reputation: 2774
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bydand View Post
Lived in tiny towns, small towns, small cities and large cities, as well as out in the country. Personally I like the country the best, but next best is tiny-small towns. While it is nice having a lot of things close in a large city, they also really don't figure into most peoples daily lives either. It isn't like most people go to shows, concerts, fine dining, etc... every day, or even once a month.

I can have all of that with just a short drive whenever I want it, but don't have to deal with; traffic, crime, crowds, bus schedules, taxi's, and all the other negatives of living in a largely populated area everyday either. I can have the quiet streets, neighborhood's where kids still walk to friends houses and ride their bikes ANYWHERE in town (or ride their bikes into town without worry. Schools that your child doesn't have to be exceptional to be known by the entire school staff. I'm not talking about a suburb that borders other suburb's or the city itself either, but a true small town where it is a drive (short or long) in any direction to get to the next town, through farmland or woodland.

Nothing wrong with loving a big city, for some it is where they thrive and come alive. But why a lot that live in large cities have to vilify country or small town living is beyond me. Some of us love stepping out of our front door and not having a lot of people around. Laying down at night and the loudest thing you hear is the fish tank filter a couple of rooms away, no cars, trucks, people, sirens, etc.... For a lot of us the big cities are not vibrant, instead they are non-stop chaos.
^This is why I really enjoyed my trip to Western Michigan last fall. With the exception of a day trip for business, it was my first visit since I was a little kid, and I fell in love with the place all over again. We used to have a cabin in Alpena when I was growing up in Ohio that almost seemed magical to us (especially coming from Cleveland). Anyway, my trip last Fall was relaxing, the place was beautiful and the people were very friendly. I loved being around all the farms too (something we really are a long way from where I live).

At this point in my life, I enjoy being adjacent to the big city, but not right in it itself. Several trips a year to the country and a certain, small beach town to get "grounded" balances things out nicely for me.
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Old 12-31-2009, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Lafayette, La
1,684 posts, read 2,638,849 times
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I like my medium sized town. Not so big to be suburbland and a crime hole, but not so small as to be uninteresting. 100-200k is the ideal sized city for me.
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Old 12-31-2009, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Benbrook, TX
23 posts, read 129,446 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidH74 View Post
I think it'd be cool to live in a small town just outside of a big city -- the best of both worlds.
Absolutely. Living in a big city stinks. I'll never do it again. Living a few miles out of the big city in a place that still has its own identity. That's the best. But the smaller city needs to have a lot of its own stuff. Otherwise you end up driving into the bigger city all the time which kind of defeats the purpose of living away from it, I think. Als,o if you work in the bigger city, you have to consider the drive time and traffic which can be a nightmare in a many places.
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Old 12-31-2009, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
3,268 posts, read 4,167,148 times
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I've never lived in the center of a huge city like Chicago or NYC. But I don't think I'd like it. (other than the ease of getting around) I think they would be too fast-paced, too loud, and too crowded.

When I was a kid, I spent some time in a very small town (about 1500 people) visiting grandparents. It was a great little town with interesting architecture, and almost no crime. (except for whatever the bored teenagers did) I don't think I would like to live there, either. They were about a 30-45 minute drive from everything except the library, post-office, and hardware store on main street.

This is part of why I like living in the rust belt. The small/medium sized cities have decent amenities/infrastructure left over from before their populations declined.
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Old 12-31-2009, 07:58 PM
Status: "Write the vision and make it plain" (set 11 days ago)
 
31,537 posts, read 37,260,454 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
I've never lived in the center of a huge city like Chicago or NYC. But I don't think I'd like it. (other than the ease of getting around) I think they would be too fast-paced, too loud, and too crowded.

When I was a kid, I spent some time in a very small town (about 1500 people) visiting grandparents. It was a great little town with interesting architecture, and almost no crime. (except for whatever the bored teenagers did) I don't think I would like to live there, either. They were about a 30-45 minute drive from everything except the library, post-office, and hardware store on main street.

This is part of why I like living in the rust belt. The small/medium sized cities have decent amenities/infrastructure left over from before their populations declined.
Exactly! I think the mid sized cities in the Rust belt have a lot to offer, even if they aren't like the huge cities.

I also understand the small communities outside of those cities would be cool too. That's why when I suggest communities to people that ask about my area, I suggest the nice villages outside of the city, not the usual suburban developments, unless that's what the person wants. We have some villages around here that have nice parks, nice restaurants, a cute business district and they are usually in good school districts. Here's some of my favorites in my area: Village of Liverpool Home Page
Skaneateles Area Chamber Of Commerce - Skaneateles Area Chamber Of Commerce | Skaneateles Area Chamber Of Commerce
http://www.manliusvillage.org/
http://www.fayettevilleny.gov/
WELCOME TO THE VILLAGE OF BALDWINSVILLE
Village of Marcellus, New York
Village of Cazenovia
http://www.chittenango.org/
Village of Canastota, NY
Village of Hamilton - Welcome to Hamilton New York
Pulaski Eastern Shore Chamber of Commerce Website
Village of North Syracuse
Village of Weedsport, Cayuga County
Village of Elbridge
Welcome to Jordan, New York, USA
Village of Minoa New York
Village of East Syracuse
Village Of Tully: Homepage: [Digital Towpath]
Village of Solvay NY Home Page
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Old 12-31-2009, 08:02 PM
 
Location: A Small Metro In Southeastern Virginia Called Virginia Beach/Norfolk.
1,555 posts, read 2,682,664 times
Reputation: 404
Wha about the small-medium sized cities? That's my option.
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