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Old 06-25-2013, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
1,314 posts, read 1,743,546 times
Reputation: 946

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Well, I often take advantage of local amenities, which will be the hardest thing to leave behind. Great (especially ethnic) restaurants, specialized arts/music/culture, meeting people from all over the world/diversity, there really are a lot of things a city can do that you can't find elsewhere. "Mexican" food in a small town serving white people simply isn't the same as a variety of Mexican restaurants serving a Mexican population - I'm sorry, it's not even close. The Internet isn't going to feed me Salvadorian food and my favorite band isn't going to play in my living room. It just depends on what's most important to you.
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Old 06-25-2013, 12:47 PM
 
5,821 posts, read 5,204,480 times
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I lived in Milwaukee many years ago. A very beautiful city! Lots of racial strife, though. And crime.

It's incorrect to think in 2013 that small towns are all White. The Hispanic population has increased multiple hundreds of times in the heartland. The Mexican restaurant that is 12 miles away from me is actually run by a couple from El Salvadore. The kitchen staff are also Hispanic - don't know for sure where they're from. The Caribbean restaurant is run by a couple - the wife is a local woman of Croatian descent and her husband is from Jamaica. The Chinese restaurant is fascinating to me - in every small town I've ever lived there is a Chinese buffet restaurant with cooks/waiters/cashiers/bus boys from - I'm not sure which Asian country - but probably China. So, yes, diversity exists in small towns.

Yes, the truly obscure food can be hard to find in a small town - but that's what makes it fun to go into the city now and then! There is no good sushi in our area - so I drive an hour and a half away and go to the nice Japanese restaurant in the SMALL city down the way.

Besides, if the only reason to live in a city and contend with pollution, overpopulation, crime (and etc.) is to be able to go to a nice restaurant every day - that's a pretty silly reason!

I DO believe very firmly that if Americans have the opportunity, they should live for at least a year or two in a place that is the opposite of the type of community in which they grew up. If everyone did that, we would all understand one another better and be a more united country.
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Old 06-25-2013, 12:49 PM
 
Location: VA
1,197 posts, read 1,605,361 times
Reputation: 1070
I could see myself living in a small town if it was on the coastline(one that doesn't get thrashed by Hurricanes) or near a picturesque ski resort, but other than that? I'll stick with cities for the foreseeable future.
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Old 06-25-2013, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
1,314 posts, read 1,743,546 times
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Not merely food, but everything else I mentioned - seeing great bands, going to art galleries, and being a part of both of those things creatively. There are so many things that you can only do in a population center, period. It's simply disingenuous to pretend that you can have everything out in the sticks that you have in a city core because of "the internet" and the fact that you can drive a couple hours to sample something quarterly that was a part of your daily life before you moved. And yes, sampling great food really is important to me.

And yes, there is crime. And traffic. And grit. People generally are not as friendly. Etc. That's why you have to figure out what's most important to you. There are advantages and disadvantages to both/all. I've lived literally out in the forest. I've lived in small towns. I've lived in small cities and big metros. I agree that everyone should experience different facets of community life.
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Old 06-25-2013, 03:35 PM
 
56,885 posts, read 81,216,145 times
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I think it depends on what is considered a small town and also the distance of the town from a bigger city. Sometimes you can enjoy both. For instance, a small community like Nyack NY is an example of a smaller community with diversity and nightlife, but it is only about 25 miles or so from NYC. You may have a small community with a college like Brockport NY that has some things to enjoy, but it essentially a second or third ring suburb of Rochester. So, it doesn't necessarily have to be an either or situation.
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Old 06-26-2013, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
1,314 posts, read 1,743,546 times
Reputation: 946
Quote:
Originally Posted by 601halfdozen0theother View Post
The reality is, most of us lead our daily lives - work and family - and don't bother to take daily advantage of the touted amenities of large cities.

So, I've found it's best to live in a small, crime and pollution free town and drive into the large city every couple of months or so for museums/theaters/special events.

With internet access and a paypal account, any kind of specialty goods are available to anyone living anywhere.

There's really not much need to live in a city anymore.

The only exception is if your field of work can ONLY be found in a large city.
I was directly addressing statements like the above. I do in fact take advantage of city amenities often, and driving to a "large city" 5 times a year just doesn't hack it for me. "The Internet" doesn't cover food, events and the arts. There certainly is a "need" to live in a city beyond work, if you value the above amenities. That's all.

So far this week, I've:

1. Gone to see an MLB (Brewers) game.
2. Walked over to one of the best Mexican restaurants in the Midwest. Had tacos.
3. Gone to see bands from all over North America. Last night - punk band from CA, psych band from Montreal, garage band from TX, great local band (small towns don't have any good local bands).
4. Met friends out at a bar where the DJ was spinning old soul 45s. Took off and walked over to a comedy open-mic down the road. A friend of mine was MC-ing, and a couple other people I know were doing acts. They weren't that funny, but hey, you can't have everything!

That's in a few days. None of the above can be achieved in a small town. If all you do is go home after work and watch TV, OK. But for some people, there is a reason to deal with the crime & etc everyone who doesn't live in a metro complains about.

Last edited by CowsAndBeer; 06-26-2013 at 07:56 AM..
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Old 06-26-2013, 06:10 PM
 
Location: 'Bout a mile off Old Mill Road
591 posts, read 641,158 times
Reputation: 476
I prefer mid-sized cities over big cities and small towns.

Look for me someday in a mid-sized city near you.
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Old 06-28-2013, 12:45 AM
 
Location: Hollywood Hills
217 posts, read 264,949 times
Reputation: 266
I live in a city of 3.82 million people (12.8 million Greater area). I wouldnt change it for anything. I love the diversity, culture, people from all over the world, the "nobody knows your businness" mentality, all kind of restaurants, nightlife, etc.
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Old 06-29-2013, 06:03 AM
 
9,413 posts, read 9,581,869 times
Reputation: 5837
Quote:
Originally Posted by CowsAndBeer View Post
I was directly addressing statements like the above. I do in fact take advantage of city amenities often, and driving to a "large city" 5 times a year just doesn't hack it for me. "The Internet" doesn't cover food, events and the arts. There certainly is a "need" to live in a city beyond work, if you value the above amenities. That's all.

So far this week, I've:

1. Gone to see an MLB (Brewers) game.
2. Walked over to one of the best Mexican restaurants in the Midwest. Had tacos.
3. Gone to see bands from all over North America. Last night - punk band from CA, psych band from Montreal, garage band from TX, great local band (small towns don't have any good local bands).
4. Met friends out at a bar where the DJ was spinning old soul 45s. Took off and walked over to a comedy open-mic down the road. A friend of mine was MC-ing, and a couple other people I know were doing acts. They weren't that funny, but hey, you can't have everything!

That's in a few days. None of the above can be achieved in a small town. If all you do is go home after work and watch TV, OK. But for some people, there is a reason to deal with the crime & etc everyone who doesn't live in a metro complains about.
Or you know, you can make friends, because small towns do have people believe it or not. Small Towns have plenty of good bands, ever hear of Areosmith? They were from a small town south of Boston.
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Old 06-29-2013, 02:08 PM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
4,962 posts, read 7,624,256 times
Reputation: 9324
I live in a very defined and connected village-like neighborhood basically at the heart of, yet somewhat geographically separated (by canyons and huge public park) to the downtown of a vibrant, safe and beautiful city. That is the best living situation in my opinion.

Still have a expansive garden, friendly neighbors, natural canyons and park, shops and dining/pubs a 5 minute walk away but close enough to walk downtown to a baseball game in a half hour or so or take a quick and frequent bus to other urban neighborhoods for a multitude of activities.
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