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Old 01-01-2010, 07:57 PM
 
Location: Fort Myers-Naples-Marco Island, FL
160 posts, read 429,166 times
Reputation: 109

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My hometown in NJ- 535.9/sq mile. Way too rural feeling and suburban sprawlish.
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Old 01-01-2010, 08:15 PM
 
Location: Two Rivers, Wisconsin
11,723 posts, read 11,548,322 times
Reputation: 12484
Interesting reading! I think I live in a "small" town (my sister (Iowa) says anything over 10,000 is not small)! My previous town had close to 90,000 when I left.

Two Rivers, Wisconsin 5.67 sq. miles and 2,083 people per sq. mi., nearby Manitowoc has approximately 33,000 people, 16.9 sq. mi and 1,966 people per sq. mi.

Last edited by susancruzs; 01-01-2010 at 08:17 PM.. Reason: addition
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Old 01-03-2010, 12:49 PM
 
Location: St Paul, MN - NJ's Gold Coast
5,256 posts, read 11,962,576 times
Reputation: 3080
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachael84 View Post
I'm wondering if any other suburbs of cities have a higher population density than here in Nassau county on Long island. It seems like our population density is higher than most cities, lol.
Parts of suburban NJ has small cities and towns that have population densities higher than most major cities.
2000 Census: US Municipalities Over 50,000: Ranked by 2000 Density

Union City, NJ has a higher population density than anywhere else. It's size is a little over one square mile and it has a population of 62,000+!
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Old 01-03-2010, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Concrete jungle where dreams are made of.
8,900 posts, read 13,240,132 times
Reputation: 1819
Quote:
Originally Posted by BPerone201 View Post
Parts of suburban NJ has small cities and towns that have population densities higher than most major cities.
2000 Census: US Municipalities Over 50,000: Ranked by 2000 Density

Union City, NJ has a higher population density than anywhere else. It's size is a little over one square mile and it has a population of 62,000+!

I mean other areas of the country though.
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Old 01-03-2010, 02:02 PM
 
11,172 posts, read 22,375,148 times
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My neighborhood is 27,000 people per square mile. Pretty good considering that over 25% of the land area is made up by 2 cemeteries and a large park.
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Old 01-03-2010, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Denver
6,628 posts, read 12,508,413 times
Reputation: 4054
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachael84 View Post
I mean other areas of the country though.
Boston has several suburbs which top 10,000/sq mile.

Cambridge: 15,780
Somerville: 18,148
Chelsea: 17,365
Lawrence: 10,009
Winthrop: 10,077
Malden: 10,925
Everett: 10,962
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Old 01-04-2010, 08:11 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,896 posts, read 7,657,858 times
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The city of Youngstown has a population density of about 2138ppsm. My current zip code in the city is similar at about 2133ppsm. But, I hope to be moving to another zip code in the city that happens to have about 4149ppsm. soon.
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Old 01-04-2010, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Fort Myers-Naples-Marco Island, FL
160 posts, read 429,166 times
Reputation: 109
Hialeah, FLorida
Population- 209,971 Density: 11,767
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Old 01-05-2010, 01:11 AM
 
Location: Phoenix
3,995 posts, read 8,865,993 times
Reputation: 901
I thought it was funny someone brought up "urban" population density compared to a city limits population density. They must be from a west coast city. This is actually a very interesting comparison; take Phoenix for instance.

The current population density of the 517 sq mile city is 3,317 ppsm.

When the "urban" or "urban footprint" density is taken into account the city jumps to nearly 8,000 ppsm.

I learned this recently from a Sustainable Cities class at ASU that examined current municipal planning and growth patterns. Phoenix has the largest municipal park (at just about 30 square miles) and huge city owned mountain preserves (Phoenix Mountain Preserves at over 37,000 acres=57.8 square miles) and large tracts of undeveloped land that is being bought and rezoned by the city as natural land preserves and no development properties that cover over 300 square miles of the 517 square miles within the city limits...

The city (along with Scottsdale and Glendale) are part of a local government and state program that provides money to a preserve and park land fund in order to curb urban/suburban sprawl. Basically, the three largest municipalities in metro Phoenix (with the exception of Mesa until next year) are preventing other smaller suburban cities from annexing more land and creating more sprawl. Phoenix voters recently approve more funding for the program and the city is continuing to buy land for preservation efforts.

Last edited by fcorrales80; 01-05-2010 at 01:24 AM..
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Old 01-05-2010, 11:42 AM
 
11,172 posts, read 22,375,148 times
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^ right. I mean Chicago is 237 square miles and has 12,500 or whatever population density.

You can back 10 square miles for the airports, 10 square miles of the Wolf Lake area on the south side that's undeveloped, huge railroad yards and southside industrial areas and suddenly the average density of developed areas starts changing quickly.

Cities like San Fran and Boston are extremely dense, but you can see how they're helped with the lack of huge industrial areas, airports that are either not in the city limits or are squeezed to within a few square miles, and don't have large tracts of undeveloped land.

Certainly saying those cities aren't dense, but I think that's one of the reasons people focus on urban density or residential density many times over just using the official boundries of cities that might include 50 square miles of farmfields or desert.
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