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Old 01-04-2010, 11:02 AM
Status: "Nobody's right if everybody's wrong" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,829 posts, read 21,130,434 times
Reputation: 9413

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I found a cool website that maps which city people most strongly identify with. You can provide your own input to be include on the map

CommonCensus Map Project - Maps

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Old 01-04-2010, 11:13 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,084 posts, read 34,145,269 times
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Like it says on the website that comes from. Most responses have come from the large urban areas and the map may be highly inaccurate. I find that to be a very true statement when looking at my own State of Michigan.
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Old 01-04-2010, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
7,732 posts, read 12,146,101 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bydand View Post
Like it says on the website that comes from. Most responses have come from the large urban areas and the map may be highly inaccurate. I find that to be a very true statement when looking at my own State of Michigan.
Absolutely. There is no way that Detroit's influence extends all the way across the UP!
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Old 01-04-2010, 11:24 AM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
32,320 posts, read 55,123,408 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnatl View Post
Absolutely. There is no way that Detroit's influence extends all the way across the UP!
This is one of those cases where the city's influence is also measured(knowingly or not) by its Metro Area. And Detroit's CSA is definitely the most influential in Michigan since more than half the state lives there. Its not surprising that Detroit has such a vast area of influence. Where else would Michiganders identify with?
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Old 01-04-2010, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
7,732 posts, read 12,146,101 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
This is one of those cases where the city's influence is also measured(knowingly or not) by its Metro Area. And Detroit's CSA is definitely the most influential in Michigan since more than half the state lives there. Its not surprising that Detroit has such a vast area of influence. Where else would Michiganders identify with?
The situation on the ground in Michigan is pretty unique. Throughout the entire State, there is generally nothing but absolute disdain for the Detroit area. People on the Western side of the State that want the "big city experience" are more likely to travel to Chicago than Detroit, even if it may be a little further for them to do so.

I can promise you that the population of the UP hardly thinks of Detroit very much, if at all.

I will also state that there are many areas of Michigan that associate with metros other than Grand Rapids and Detroit.

I would also greatly expand Grand Rapids sphere of influence over what the map indicates.
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Old 01-04-2010, 11:36 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,084 posts, read 34,145,269 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
This is one of those cases where the city's influence is also measured(knowingly or not) by its Metro Area. And Detroit's CSA is definitely the most influential in Michigan since more than half the state lives there. Its not surprising that Detroit has such a vast area of influence. Where else would Michiganders identify with?
Most do NOT identify with Detroit. The UP most of the time is with Green Bay, WI. The Western side is Grand Rapids, MI; and the Northern part of the lower peninsula leans toward Traverse City, MI. Other areas identify with Lansing, Ann Arbor, Kalamazoo, etc.... For the most part, 90% of the land area of the state hates Detroit and has little, if nothing, to do with it; they sure do not identify with it. Given the distances involved, it would be like trying to say those who live in San Fransisco, identifies with LA
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Old 01-04-2010, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
32,320 posts, read 55,123,408 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnatl View Post
The situation on the ground in Michigan is pretty unique. Throughout the entire State, there is generally nothing but absolute disdain for the Detroit area. People on the Western side of the State that want the "big city experience" are more likely to travel to Chicago than Detroit, even if it may be a little further for them to do so.

I can promise you that the population of the UP hardly thinks of Detroit very much, if at all.

I will also state that there are many areas of Michigan that associate with metros other than Grand Rapids and Detroit.

I would also greatly expand Grand Rapids sphere of influence over what the map indicates.
Cool. Thanks for the perspective.
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Old 01-04-2010, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
32,320 posts, read 55,123,408 times
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Here's a map of Bureau of Economic Area Economic Areas. I think this is a very good indicator of interdependent areas.


BEA Economic Areas by Population, 2007
New York 23,102,699
Los Angeles 19,495,361
Chicago 10,443,446
San Francisco 9,526,438
Washington 9,058,427
Boston 8,215,459
Dallas 7,755,470
Atlanta 7,371,342
Detroit 6,997,479
Philadelphia 6,893,584
Houston 6,511,821
Miami 6,085,767
MInneapolis 5,187,305
Phoenix 4,731,804
Cleveland 4,604,932
Seattle 4,539,568
Orlando 4,388,326
Denver 3,968,834
St Louis 3,366,542
Indianapolis 3,330,982
Raleigh 3,075,901
Portland 3,024,724
San Diego 2,959,734
Pittsburgh 2,879,762
Charlotte 2,779,570
Nashville 2,737,954
Tampa 2,715,273
Sacramento 2,694,692
Columbus 2,607,561
Kansas City 2,580,711
Salt Lake City 2,493,619
Cincinnati 2,31,587
Milwaukee 2,323,196
San Antonio 2,271,684
Las Vegas 2,255,920
Hartford 2,254,041
Harrisburg 2,106,841

BEA : CA1-3 - Population*1/
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Old 01-04-2010, 01:13 PM
 
2,755 posts, read 11,760,764 times
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Cites like Denver and Salt Lake City have larger hinterlands because there are very few competitors for "big city" attention anywhere near these cities. These two cities, in fact, are easily the most isolated metropolitan areas in the country. Other than Colorado Springs (and each other), these cities are many, many hours drive from anything remotely resembling a metro area, and so have a huge "hinterlands" according to this map.
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Old 01-04-2010, 02:28 PM
 
56,511 posts, read 80,803,243 times
Reputation: 12480
Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
Here's a map of Bureau of Economic Area Economic Areas. I think this is a very good indicator of interdependent areas.


BEA Economic Areas by Population, 2007
New York 23,102,699
Los Angeles 19,495,361
Chicago 10,443,446
San Francisco 9,526,438
Washington 9,058,427
Boston 8,215,459
Dallas 7,755,470
Atlanta 7,371,342
Detroit 6,997,479
Philadelphia 6,893,584
Houston 6,511,821
Miami 6,085,767
MInneapolis 5,187,305
Phoenix 4,731,804
Cleveland 4,604,932
Seattle 4,539,568
Orlando 4,388,326
Denver 3,968,834
St Louis 3,366,542
Indianapolis 3,330,982
Raleigh 3,075,901
Portland 3,024,724
San Diego 2,959,734
Pittsburgh 2,879,762
Charlotte 2,779,570
Nashville 2,737,954
Tampa 2,715,273
Sacramento 2,694,692
Columbus 2,607,561
Kansas City 2,580,711
Salt Lake City 2,493,619
Cincinnati 2,31,587
Milwaukee 2,323,196
San Antonio 2,271,684
Las Vegas 2,255,920
Hartford 2,254,041
Harrisburg 2,106,841

BEA : CA1-3 - Population*1/
Harrisburg is a sleeper. For a city of about 48,000, it does seem to have a A LOT of regional influence in Central PA.

Ironically, after looking at the rest of the list, Syracuse is the next city.......It is the heart of the Central NY region, which covers just under 2 million people and 3 other metro areas.
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