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View Poll Results: Which time period was better?
the 80's & 90's 229 69.82%
the 00's/now 99 30.18%
Voters: 328. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-10-2010, 08:21 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,391 posts, read 24,552,631 times
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80s 90s easily... 04-07 were okay for a bit... downhill from there. Definitely more "anxiety" in day to day life now and more of a rat race. standard of living has gone downnnn everything is way more expensive and salaries haven't moved up to compensate, even as more people than ever go to college.
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Old 01-11-2010, 01:37 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
4,085 posts, read 7,666,159 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachael84 View Post
Like my mom said, the 80s were better because there wasn't nearly as much off-shoring. My dad works in computers, and once the mid/late 90s came, he kept losing his job. Less and less jobs available because of the off-shoring. In the 80s, we made good money and never really worried about him losing his job.
Before this current recession, the worst recession since WWII was from 1989 to about 1993. People were laid off and jobs were hard to find. I graduated college in 1990 and they said it was the worst job market since WWII. I worked retail for 3 years and I was the lucky one of my friends. More than half my friends went home to live with their parents and didn't work at all for a year or more. Entry-level jobs were hard to find and retail and other similar jobs were fiercely competed for.

So, the 80's - 90's was not really a better quality of life economy-wise. It may have been a little better, but the economy isn't what made it a better quality of life.

What did it was the lack of technology that we have today. We were in a very modern world but with no cell phones, iPods, etc. - technology was there and it made our lives easier but not life-altering as it does today. I never had to worry about keeping my phone on after work or on days off. It wasn't expected of me to get a memo until I was back at work because e-mail was not prevalent until the very end of the 90's.

When I went to dinner with friends, we all kept each other company. Now, though, one person is texting, another one is getting up to take a VERY IMPORTANT call (usually from a friend who is calling to tell them where they are and what they are doing for no apparent reason), another one's phone is ringing with some crazy ring tone and interrupting everyone else.

I could leave my house with my wallet and keys and be OK back then.. Now, if I don't have my phone, I feel helpless and naked. If I miss phone calls for a whole evening, the person who called thinks something happened and I'm in the hospital. In the old days, people couldn't reach you so they just assumed you were out and about and doing fine.

Back then you go to a coffee shop and people are chatting with each other there, or reading a book or a paper. Now they are on Wi-Fi, playing games, chatting with someone in Uzbekistan, fighting each other for an outlet before their batteries die, taking up a whole table to do their homework or turning it into their de facto office and conducting business.

Now I get stuck on the internet for hours on end and have to make a conscious effort to watch the time and get out and actually DO things. Back then everything required being out and about, interacting with real people, etc.

Technology is great in a lot of ways, but it's smothering us in the 00's - the 80's and 90's were modern enough but simple enough, too.
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Old 01-11-2010, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Floribama
14,947 posts, read 31,339,738 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by machiavelli1 View Post
Not just job security, the music was happier, better quality. It was a time that in most places kids were carefree and could play outside. We felt safe as a nation and people.
Yep, we had songs like 'Born in the USA', 'R.O.C.K. in the USA', 'Pink Houses', and 'Small Town' that clearly showed people back then had more pride in their country no matter where they lived. You don't hear many songs like that anymore.

It also better when you could go out in public without seeing everyone with a cellphone stuck to their ear.
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Old 01-11-2010, 08:42 PM
 
Location: NJ
12,284 posts, read 31,753,990 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
Yep, we had songs like 'Born in the USA', 'R.O.C.K. in the USA', 'Pink Houses', and 'Small Town' that clearly showed people back then had more pride in their country no matter where they lived. You don't hear many songs like that anymore.

It also better when you could go out in public without seeing everyone with a cellphone stuck to their ear.
ummm...do you know what that song is about, don't you?
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Old 01-11-2010, 10:19 PM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
13,856 posts, read 22,953,196 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tahiti View Post
ummm...do you know what that song is about, don't you?
I thought the person was being intentionally ironic. Most of those songs have an element of darkness to them. The Mellencamp songs are happier than "Born in the USA" but they're not entirely carefree. Most of them seem to speak of dreams that died, lack of opportunity, or hardships you live through before you become something. Like I love his "Jack and Diane" but "life goes on long after the thrill of living is gone" (I hope that's not a copyright problem) is not exactly the happiest lyric in the world.
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Old 01-12-2010, 06:36 AM
 
Location: NJ
12,284 posts, read 31,753,990 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
I thought the person was being intentionally ironic. Most of those songs have an element of darkness to them. The Mellencamp songs are happier than "Born in the USA" but they're not entirely carefree. Most of them seem to speak of dreams that died, lack of opportunity, or hardships you live through before you become something. Like I love his "Jack and Diane" but "life goes on long after the thrill of living is gone" (I hope that's not a copyright problem) is not exactly the happiest lyric in the world.
I know! LOL My guess is the poster probably didn't grow up in the 80's. If he had said "Walking on Sunshine" he may have had a point, LOL.
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Old 01-12-2010, 07:06 AM
 
6,431 posts, read 9,948,829 times
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Ok I was alive during the latter part of the 90s. I didn't exist in the 80s but I think I have enough credibility to answer this. I personally believe quality of life has increased since the 80s and 90s! I wouldn't wish to go back for anything in the world. I mean yes, the fashions, the music, the TV shows were awesome. And I'm not cool with how corrupt my generation has become but I still wouldn't go back. We have had too many accomplishments in the world today to go back to the way it was. Trust me. I've caught reruns of my favorite shows online from the 90s and 80s and I've sat there and just began getting tired. Sometimes the good ol' days were meant to be spent in that moment alone and no other.
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Old 01-12-2010, 07:52 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas, NV
5,739 posts, read 12,439,154 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Fairfaxian View Post
Note: This is an offshoot from the "Better Quality of Life - 50's and 60's or Now?" thread.

From what I recall, families for the most part were able to maintain a decent standard of living with responsible spending. There were still a fair amount of one-income families, but a two-income household usually assured at least a middle-class standard of living. There were a few wars and minor recessions here and there, but not to the extent of being life-altering to an entire nation.

The amenities we have today were still around in these days, but just in a more simplified way (but were still entertaining) Instead of Wiis and Playstations, we had Ataris and 8 & 16 bit Nintendos. Instead of HDTV and a trillion satellite channels, we had stereo and basic cable & broadcast channels with quality shows. Instead of T1 and broadband, we had Dial-Up and DSL. Instead of mp3 and iPods, we had cassettes/CDs and walkmans. Despite these things, people still maintained a sense of awareness and communication with the outside world.

Also, people back then seemed a lot more social and outgoing. Parties and get-togethers were more than common during these days (and it wasn't just for birthdays or holidays). The demeanor of many people were more approachable and with less attitude, which made it easier to socialize and meet people in general. The way of making friends and meeting people of the opposite sex involved less manipulation and games, and was just more upfront and genuine. And people - for the most part - used to work out their problems, instead of quitting and pinning blame on everyone else like today.

I could go one and on, but to be honest, it's very hard to argue that today is better than the 1950s for everyone except for perhaps white christian men. But compared to the 1980s and especially the 1990s, the only improvement I've seen in this decade is in technology (a faster and more interactive internet, more video game graphics, utilization of cell phones as computers, etc.). I understand times and trends change, but why does it seem to be for the worst in 9 out of 10 categories.

I know that the (mid-late) 2000s were good and 2010s will be better for me - by a default financial standpoint - because my standard of living increased by attaining a college degree in a decent major, and I'll be able to mobilize myself easier if I don't like a certain city/region. But I'm asking this for the general aspect of the quality of living and the outlook of the 2000s and the upcoming decade.
I chose the 80s and 90s. I wasnt born until the very end of 1989 so I missed out on the 80s unfortunately I remember things from 1994 til the end of that decade. The 90s were pretty awesome. Orlando, FL was definitely an awesome place to live at that time (still is today IMO) I remember my family moving there in early 1995.

I used to love 90's Nickelodeon with shows like Rocko's Modern Life, AHHH! Real Monsters, Hey Arnold, The Angry Beavers

For me personally 2000-2009 got to a very rough start, things got a lot better starting in 2008 when I was hired at my current job but even in spite of this damn economy I can say that as of right now I am in a good place financially and emtionally. I have a good job, a car that Im paying for, great friends, and a great family. And as I save money to move to Las Vegas later this year, Im excited for what exciting endeavors await me in 2010-2019
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Old 01-12-2010, 09:37 AM
 
886 posts, read 1,923,271 times
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Mid to late 90s was awesome.... the best. I was class of 99....

People weren't as paranoid, the economy was good.... the music was awesome.
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Old 01-12-2010, 10:06 AM
 
921 posts, read 985,030 times
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I'm 32 years old & I think that life in the late 90's & 00's was mostly based on economic inflation.
In today's time, the US was forced to face reality, which is to live at or within our means, & not beyond what we can afford.
This is what led to the credit crisis.
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1272/is_n2640_v127/ai_21114557/

That's why most people thought those were the great days but people who knew the truth back then are now shaking their heads saying "see, I told you so".

My conclusion is I think that now is better than the 90's & 00's because everyone who was struck by the recent economic wake-up call has now learned to work mostly for what they need & not only feed their desires for what they want.
We are now living in a time of reality, in which hopefully no one is no longer blinded by inflation.

It's good that today's new generations are learning that "less or just enough is better" rather what some people were taught in the 90's & 00's, which was "living in excess to keep up with the next".

Last edited by imalert; 01-12-2010 at 10:46 AM..
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