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Old 11-27-2012, 08:37 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
2,958 posts, read 3,817,736 times
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In today's age, being from a affluent or rich city is far more important than if it's a big city or not. For Southern California, for instance, being from LA or San Bernardino is no where near as impressive as being from Newport Beach or Irvine. In fact, most of the people from Orange County look down on the other counties (the OC being made up of mostly big suburbs and gated communities in the nicer parts.)
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Old 11-28-2012, 12:22 AM
 
Location: Carrboro, NC
1,461 posts, read 1,445,249 times
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Perhaps this is a phenomenon that happens in really large world-class cities. And even then, I think they prefer to compare themselves against other similarly-sized cities. In most mid-sized cities, the impact of the city does not outweigh the impact of the state. So most people tend to compare states. There might be the occasional bit of saber rattling between Raleigh and Charlotte on these types of forums, but at the end of the day if someone says an ill word about NC we'll all band together to slay the heretic. I think that kind of statewide mentality occurs even in California, New York, and Texas.

In NC everyone from the major cities tends to like Asheville and Wilmington (small tourist cities), and they respect the charm of some of the small towns around the state. People snub Fayetteville a lot--not because of its size, but because it suffers from the typical problems that military cities with no other industries tend to have, and because people driving through NC on I-95 will see Fayetteville and nothing else, so a lot of us resent that Fayetteville is the representative image of the state for many outsiders.
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Old 11-28-2012, 07:54 PM
 
Location: Carrboro and Concord, NC
964 posts, read 2,046,048 times
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There's beginning to be a big rural/urban divide in North Carolina, but it corresponds more closely to politics than actual size: Charlotte-Mecklenburg, Asheville, Boone, and the Research Triangle region, which are all of widely varying size, but all lean far enough to the left that they have tipped some elections in the state, VS everywhere else.

Thus, some big-but-conservative cities (Greensboro and Fayetteville immediately spring to mind: Greensboring and Fayettenam would be their unflattering, stereotypical nicknames) are really looked down on, whereas Asheville once had a nudist run for mayor (which drew "Rolling Stone" magazine to town), Chapel Hill was once the epicenter of a humongous indie-rock scene (which drew "Rolling Stone" magazine, along with a casting call for MTV's "The Real World" to town), and now seems to think it's ground zero for Richard Florida's methodologically dubious "Creative Class" theorizing, and Boone is about as Birkenstock-friendly of a town as you're gonna find this side of Boulder.
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Old 11-29-2012, 01:23 PM
 
933 posts, read 1,606,961 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MB8abovetherim View Post
In California I've noticed those from our 4th largest city not only bash and look down on the LARGEST city in the state, but then they compare themselves to the largest city in the nation. Happens all the time.
The San Francisco complex, eh? I've heard a thing or two about this
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Old 11-30-2012, 08:24 PM
 
Location: The State Of California
9,467 posts, read 12,302,853 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GatsbyGatz View Post
In today's age, being from a affluent or rich city is far more important than if it's a big city or not. For Southern California, for instance, being from LA or San Bernardino is no where near as impressive as being from Newport Beach or Irvine. In fact, most of the people from Orange County look down on the other counties (the OC being made up of mostly big suburbs and gated communities in the nicer parts.)

OC is not the most elite area in California to be looking down it's nose at anybody.....
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Old 11-30-2012, 08:33 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,135 posts, read 21,878,713 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
Very true...and to generalize about people based on where they live is just absurd. All kinds of different people live in every corner of the Earth.
I am not sure I agree with that. Have you ever seen or read about a study of rats that have more space compared to rats that are put closer together in a smaller space. I think the study has a name, but typically the rats in a smaller space have more difficult living conditions and it changes their personalities. So yes, we in the country look down on people that choose to live on top of each other in the city. That is the way my mother used to put it. She did not like the idea of not being a land owner and having space that was your own and no one else could come on that land unless you agreed to it. Seems like people in the city spend too much time minding each others business. Living in the country is a much better life.
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Old 04-02-2019, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Reno, NV
1,520 posts, read 704,421 times
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My experience is that small towns in Nevada aren't as culturally isolated from bigger cities as you'd think, even if they're very geographically isolated. Lovelock, Winnemucca, Elko, Battle Mountain - these places are mostly along Interstates, so they get travelers from all over. And a surprising percentage of people even in Nevada's most desolate counties were born in other states. I also think it might have to do with the West being more recently settled so it doesn't have the really entrenched, "this is how we do things here" local cultures that other places in the country do.

When I was driving through these places recently, the young people seemed like they could be from Reno or Vegas - just their general attitude, the slang they used, the way they dressed, their hobbies and the industries they worked in. The cafes and trinket shops in most od these towns felt just as trendy as the ones I'm used to. It wasn't like the Midwest where the small towns have a really insular, backwoods, farm-country, few-decades-behind feel.

So I would say people from Reno and Vegas might feel sorry that people in Nevada's small towns ostensibly don't have much to do or many local opportunities, but there's not the same kind of cultural disconnect that you find when a Chicagoan goes to downstate Illinois or vice versa. I never realized this phenomenon about much of the West until I actually moved here myself.
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Old 04-02-2019, 06:25 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
1,376 posts, read 1,194,242 times
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Most of the smaller cities in Minnesota have some sort of draw from the Twin Cities (Duluth for summer/fall tourism, Rochester for medical care, Brainerd for summer resorts, Saint Cloud as a major college town, Mankato as a major college town, Bemidji for summer resorts, etc.), so no, not really. Minnesotans generally have a lot of pride for the entire state no matter where in the state they're from.
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Old 04-02-2019, 06:40 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,699 posts, read 36,132,256 times
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The only time I ever feel this is from my sister in law. I live in Tyler, TX and she lives in Fort Worth. I COULD live in Fort Worth if I wanted to - or Austin, or Houston, or Atlanta, or NYC, or LA or basically anywhere near an airport. But I don't WANT to. I like Tyler, Texas.

And she grew up in Abilene, so shut the front door!

Seriously, it gets irritating occasionally because she will sometimes actually talk down to me, as if I'm not cosmopolitan or something. This is clearly her problem, not mine, and I'd hate to be so pretentious myself, so usually I think it's funny, but sometimes it rubs me the wrong way.

Oh well, I'm still me and she's still her and I much prefer it that way!
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