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Old 01-17-2010, 10:45 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Desert kid View Post
I'll admit, when I worked at the old call center, many southern women I came in contact with called me "Hon'", "Sug" and as one black woman put it "Child" (pronounced: Chiiiiled. special emphasis on the i). Even over the phone it felt so warm and welcoming. And southern men, called me "sir", which is a term I use myself but I am almost never given the moniker of. Such a warm and respectful society, almost like a dream, my dream.
I'm in absolute agreement, Desert Kid, and have experienced similar warmth.

It's almost an alien concept up here in the Northeast

One of the reasons I fell in love with the Southern United States.
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Old 01-18-2010, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Southeast Arizona
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ReluctantGardenStater View Post
I'm in absolute agreement, Desert Kid, and have experienced similar warmth.

It's almost an alien concept up here in the Northeast

One of the reasons I fell in love with the Southern United States.
All the more why I want it to be July already.
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Old 01-18-2010, 05:39 PM
 
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I've heard people comment that way in the south before when visiting. It's interesting how different words common usage changes in different regions.

Growing up in Iowa, and working in a grocery store, I at times heard people call older women ma'am. More in the Midwest though, ma'am isn't very common when talking to people. It has the aura of being a term that is used to refer to an older woman in a more dry, proper way. Most women would just chuckle and give a strange look if they were referred to as "ma'am", like they were some prim/proper older woman from the 1800's who needed to be referenced in some sort of higher class kinda way. I WOULD hear the word more often though if a stranger was trying to get someone's attention who wasn't paying attention. Like if you dropped a glove or something and were walking away. Usually you'd pick it up and yell out "ma'am!, is this yours?".


That said - I hear the common theme of the OP all around the country, just using different verbiage.
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