U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 06-06-2007, 06:49 PM
 
Location: In God
3,073 posts, read 10,772,603 times
Reputation: 510

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
That's exactly where I was coming from. I really don't care for the sq. mileage because New York is smaller than Houston yet it has 5.5 million more people. But anyone that has visited San Antonio and Dallas knows that Dallas feels like it's the much much bigger city.

mpope, city population numbers are irrelevant in the grand scheme of things. Nobody cares that Houston is the 4th largest city or Phoenix is the 5th largest city. To really determine the size of a city, you have to use the MSA or the UA(Urbanized Area). The reason is because cities usually grow outside of it's arbitrary boundaries layed out by the city council and state. And while Texas has or had very liberal laws on annexation, other states did not. For this reason, city limits are different from state to state. That only adds to the irrelevance of city population numbers. If I go visit the Dallas area and the San Antonio area, I'm sorry, but San Antonio is just much smaller between the two. Dallas has a bigger downtown, much more urban and dense, and has everything San Antonio has but more.

Here are examples of how irrelevant city population numbers are.
Jacksonville is the biggest city in Florida. In reality, it's the 4th largest
Jacksonville is the biggest city in the southeast. In reality, it's not even in the top 10
Indianapolis is bigger than San Francisco and so is San Jose for that matter.
Austin is bigger than Boston and Atlanta. Who really believes this.
You need to re-read what I said. Technically, San Antonio is larger than Dallas. In population and area. I never said that it felt like a bigger city. I'm not stupid.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-06-2007, 06:55 PM
 
Location: In God
3,073 posts, read 10,772,603 times
Reputation: 510
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Well you will probably need to get use to hearing it because that's what most people uses to reference the bigger of either city you are comparing. For example, Houston is larger than Philadelphia in it's metro. But most consider Philadelphia region the bigger city. There has been countless threads on what is America's 4th city. The majority of the people listed San Francisco, Philadelphia, and Boston before Houston. When determining the 4th city of the US. It comes down to more than just population.
Unfortunately for them, there's no official ranking of cities (except for population). Most of those people have never even been to each place to be able to judge accordingly; furthermore, things like that shouldn't be argued about when they can't be set in stone. People could argue with me until the sun went down, but I would not be convinced that Houston isn't the fourth city, and for very legitimate reasons.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-06-2007, 07:33 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,653 posts, read 27,092,504 times
Reputation: 9584
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpope409 View Post
You need to re-read what I said. Technically, San Antonio is larger than Dallas. In population and area. I never said that it felt like a bigger city. I'm not stupid.
Didn't say you were, but I'm just saying that population and especially area is the least factor of determining which city is bigger, honestly.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-07-2007, 04:55 AM
 
Location: Henderson NV
1,134 posts, read 915,394 times
Reputation: 82
Houston and Chicago? Yeah, they have something in common, their eating habits! Chicken fried steak and deep dish pizza. The winner, Chicago, by a belch! Now, there are reasons why cities don't have skylines of consequence and the reasons vary. The local economy doesn't call for it or the layout of a city doesn't necessitate it, but the reason you don't see a lot of supertall structures in places like Los Angeles, San Francisco and the world capital of Tokyo (amazing!) is the fact that these cities all reside in a level 4 seismic zone and structures must withstand an 8 on the richter scale. Very expensive structures, indeed! I'd like to see Chicago or New York after a "6" event. Not pretty. An "8"? Rebuild on another site at a later date. Pray you don't have them! Seattle is in a worse predicament, having to deal with Mt. Hood, the earthquakes and the sunami of melted snow picking up every pine tree and rushing into town!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-07-2007, 07:29 AM
 
Location: In God
3,073 posts, read 10,772,603 times
Reputation: 510
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Didn't say you were, but I'm just saying that population and especially area is the least factor of determining which city is bigger, honestly.
Technically, no.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-07-2007, 07:31 AM
 
Location: In God
3,073 posts, read 10,772,603 times
Reputation: 510
Quote:
Originally Posted by milquetoast View Post
Houston and Chicago? Yeah, they have something in common, their eating habits! Chicken fried steak and deep dish pizza. The winner, Chicago, by a belch! Now, there are reasons why cities don't have skylines of consequence and the reasons vary. The local economy doesn't call for it or the layout of a city doesn't necessitate it, but the reason you don't see a lot of supertall structures in places like Los Angeles, San Francisco and the world capital of Tokyo (amazing!) is the fact that these cities all reside in a level 4 seismic zone and structures must withstand an 8 on the richter scale. Very expensive structures, indeed! I'd like to see Chicago or New York after a "6" event. Not pretty. An "8"? Rebuild on another site at a later date. Pray you don't have them! Seattle is in a worse predicament, having to deal with Mt. Hood, the earthquakes and the sunami of melted snow picking up every pine tree and rushing into town!
But Los Angeles has a building taller than Houston's tallest. So what's wrong with the rest of its skyline?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-07-2007, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Texas
2,703 posts, read 2,610,847 times
Reputation: 206
By 15 damn feet. If the FAA let us build the JP Morgan Chase like we wanted to, it would be 80 stories, not 75. The restriction was lifted after the tower was completed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-07-2007, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Katy-zuela
4,852 posts, read 9,002,567 times
Reputation: 2364
Quote:
Originally Posted by Supernova7 View Post
I'm looking to make a big move at the end of this year to wither Portland or Houston and need your help. I'm a Californian who's lived in Chicago as well as have seen many people on this board compare the two cities, stating that they are "very similar." Now, I can speak for Chicago but can't for Houston. So I figure if you can give me an idea of how Houston ties in to Chicago I can get a better feel for what life in Houston is actually like.

I'm trying to picture how Chicago's social/liberal scene ties in to a southern conservative bible belt state? Apparently, nearly everyone seems to have the same impression of Texans, that they are wonderful people, very nice and all BUT madly conservative about every social issue and thus as a result Texas has very strict laws, harsh sentencing and has the highest prison population in the U.S. This is what people are telling me and it's frightening because I believe Texas, especially Houston deserves a chance. You're made to feel that unless you're a hardcore conservative you don't belong in Texas because Texas is about living "according to scripture"...because George Bush said so....LOL

Seriously though here are some facts:

Chicago- More expensive than Houston but nothing like CA or NY.
Unbeatable culture of entertainment, architecture, music and dining.
Excellent Transportation system ... bus/rail round the clock.
Impossible to be bored and cost of living is moderate.
Economy could be better but it's making a comeback.
Racism? Yes, certain areas, mainly in the burbs but still uncommon.
Heart of Chicago-Melting pot of race and cultures. People get along.

Houston-Much lower cost of living.
Spread out as opposed to Chicago everything is built up. No urban sprawl.
Houston-stronger economy
Both cities offer a variety in employment, maybe a bit more in Chicago.
Houston- long way to go with the public transit system.

Personally, I don't see how these two cities compare other than the fact that they're both very large. Chicago is a hub fro immigrants as well. So you have people from all over the globe that immigrated to this city. Not sure where Houston stands. It seems that the social, political and economic climate as well as cost of living is very different between the cities.

I loved Chicago when I lived there and if Houston has strong similarities then it would make my choice between Portland easier. Only I don't understand where people are coming up with the two cities as being near identical.

Your thoughts?
Chicago has a very big influence on state politics. 75% of Illini live in Chicagoland. Outside of Chicagoland, it is very traditional republican. But if it wasn't for Chicago, Illinois would be a red state.

A former Houston councilman and congressman who lost his seat due to Delay's redistricting ran against Rick Perry, the current Republican governor, in the November election. He was second place. I should mention that TX Senator Rodney Ellis tried to pass a statewide smoking ban. He is usually the lone progressive voice in the 'Lege.'

We are also a hub of immigrants. In the same way Chicago has the largest Polish population outside of Poland, we have the second-largest Vietnamese population in the United States (only to Orange County, CA) and a large Nigerian population. I read one time in the newspaper that a Nigerian tribal king moved here to be closer to his subjects because most of them migrated here. It is impossible to tell which are the children of native born African-Americans and Nigerian immigrants except when they reveal their names.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guerilla View Post
By 15 damn feet. If the FAA let us build the JP Morgan Chase like we wanted to, it would be 80 stories, not 75. The restriction was lifted after the tower was completed.
Does that mean we can build the Sears Tower in Downtown Houston now?

Quote:
Originally Posted by mpope409 View Post
But Los Angeles has a building taller than Houston's tallest. So what's wrong with the rest of its skyline?
The U.S. Bank tower, formerly the Library Tower/First Interstate Tower or to G.W.B., the Liberty Tower. This is the most distinct one in L.A., a white round tower with a crown. Apparently this was the West Coast target on 9/11. If this building fell, the Chase Tower would be the tallest west of the Mississippi.

Last edited by KerrTown; 06-07-2007 at 09:05 AM.. Reason: tower
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-07-2007, 10:07 AM
 
766 posts, read 2,271,023 times
Reputation: 698
Quote:
Originally Posted by KerrTown View Post
Chicago has a very big influence on state politics. 75% of Illini live in Chicagoland. Outside of Chicagoland, it is very traditional republican. But if it wasn't for Chicago, Illinois would be a red state.

A former Houston councilman and congressman who lost his seat due to Delay's redistricting ran against Rick Perry, the current Republican governor, in the November election. He was second place. I should mention that TX Senator Rodney Ellis tried to pass a statewide smoking ban. He is usually the lone progressive voice in the 'Lege.'

We are also a hub of immigrants. In the same way Chicago has the largest Polish population outside of Poland, we have the second-largest Vietnamese population in the United States (only to Orange County, CA) and a large Nigerian population. I read one time in the newspaper that a Nigerian tribal king moved here to be closer to his subjects because most of them migrated here. It is impossible to tell which are the children of native born African-Americans and Nigerian immigrants except when they reveal their names.



Does that mean we can build the Sears Tower in Downtown Houston now?



The U.S. Bank tower, formerly the Library Tower/First Interstate Tower or to G.W.B., the Liberty Tower. This is the most distinct one in L.A., a white round tower with a crown. Apparently this was the West Coast target on 9/11. If this building fell, the Chase Tower would be the tallest west of the Mississippi.
I would say a lot of "blue" states would turn "red" if you took out their largest metropolitan area. Outside of the New York City metro, the rest of New York State is pretty Republican. I remember seeing the county-by-county map of voting results of the entire country from the 2004 election, and it was amazing to see how almost universally that the blue counties were the handful of ones that consisted of high population urban and suburban areas while you'd see huge swaths of red everywhere else (but composed of less populous areas).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-07-2007, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,653 posts, read 27,092,504 times
Reputation: 9584
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpope409 View Post
Technically, no.
Technically, yes.
Quote:
unfortunately for them, there's no official ranking of cities (except for population). Most of those people have never even been to each place to be able to judge accordingly; furthermore, things like that shouldn't be argued about when they can't be set in stone. People could argue with me until the sun went down, but I would not be convinced that Houston isn't the fourth city, and for very legitimate reasons.
I think most of those people actually have been to each place to able to judge accordingly. But I'm saying when you are saying that the top 4 cities of the US, don't automatically put Houston in there because everybody outside of Houston will disagree. They will more than likely agree that San Francisco (especially), or Philadelphia is the 4th city in the US.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top