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Old 06-03-2007, 08:35 AM
 
47 posts, read 36,569 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Supernova7 View Post
Not really, I'm just looking for a particular environment/community that fits my interests and needs. I wouldn't call it "Utopia" as that term would refer to "magic and something that doesn't exist." What I'm looking for is simple...A big city vibe, culture and atmosphere balanced with a low cost of living.
I'm sure that many people are looking for the same (myself included), but "There ain't no such thing as a free lunch" in today's society. I think one reason that cities tend to be liberal is because the interdependence of individuals is immediate. The benefits of urban life such as those mentioned by Tone509 need the support of their users, or else suffer- in which case the residents would have to live with the consequences or leave.
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Old 06-03-2007, 08:37 AM
 
609 posts, read 2,722,297 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by filmfan View Post
I'm sure that many people are looking for the same (myself included), but "There ain't no such thing as a free lunch" in today's society. I think one reason that cities tend to be liberal is because the interdependence of individuals is immediate. The benefits of urban life such as those mentioned by MTone need the support of their users, or else suffer- in which case the residents would have to live with the consequences or leave.
Low cost of living cities that are big:
Dallas
Houston

Keep in mind that most urban cores are "liberal"...
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Old 06-03-2007, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Portland, OR
42 posts, read 56,265 times
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I wouldn't exactly call Houston liberal. Yes, Dallas is liberal with quite a base of liberal voters, but the majority of Houston voted for Bush. I am not saying Houston is conservative, and I imagine there are pockets of Houston that are far-left, just as there are in any city. However, overall, the city leans more towards moderate, which many would deem a good thing
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Old 06-03-2007, 09:44 AM
 
Location: from houstoner to bostoner to new yorker to new jerseyite ;)
4,085 posts, read 11,455,026 times
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I'm sick of these red vs. blue arguments, but for accuracy's sake, the majority of Harris County voted for Bush, but plenty of people gave him a run for his money and voted for Kerry, too. Remarkable considering that Bush Sr. lives in west Houston and previously served as House Rep for the 7th congressional district there, where it's heavily Republican and extremely affluent so what else would you expect? The city of Houston voted for Kerry. A bunch of people didn't vote at all. Houston is more libertarian in spirit and maybe fiscally conservative than socially conservative. I don't think you could consider either Dallas or Houston LIBERAL like SF, but who cares? A liberal bubble-type city it's not, and I'm glad. There's so much more to the fabric of a city than whether it voted red or blue in an election three years ago, sheesh.
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Old 06-03-2007, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Journey's End
10,189 posts, read 24,914,464 times
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Good info, dullnboring, but it appears as if some of these cities may vote on a liberal basis, but be unliveable, ie. Detroit.

As a former NYer, I'd say the 79% is fairly accurate with or without Bloomberg, and even when Rudy was in office. However, every city has its core population and its non-core dissenters and NYC is no different.

Two people also mentioned Providence, RI. And as I lived there in reasonable liberal or let's say progressive bliss for more than 5 years, I'd say iit has a core blue colour, non-liberal base, and a smaller core group of academics and progressive thinkers in both parties of which I was a member. The Rhode Island election this year was the most surprising to me with the loss of a Chafee--a Republican who thought in terms of people not politics.

Overall I think we have to take the good with the bad, and that is depending on our own values and definition of liberal. There is no nirvana here in the States or elsewhere, imo.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dullnboring View Post
As I just posted in the "most conservative city" thread, I just recently found the link to a report that details the political demography of our nation's large cities and ranks them on their liberalness and conservativeness. As a note, the website came to it's results using the results of the 2004 Presidential election and adding up the percentage of voters who voted for conservative candidates (largely Bush) and liberal candidates (largely Kerry). There's some flaws in this system of tabulation, largely on the liberal side in my opinion as it equates Democrat with liberal which isn't always the case (nor is Republican and conservative, but I feel the difference is more pronounced with Democrat/liberal) in the sense that many of the cities that came out on top like Detroit, have high minority populations, which while they vote overwhelmingly Democrat, actually are fairly socially conservative. Ditto for the cities with a strong tradition of labor unions. However, it does give a good general indicator of a city's culture. They looked at all cities with a population of over 100,000. Of the major (over 300,000 cities), the most liberal (with the percentage by which they voted liberal included by me) were found to be:

1. Detroit - 94%
2. Washington, D.C. - 90%
3. Oakland - 90%
4. San Francisco - 84%
5. Cleveland - 83%
6. Baltimore - 83%
7. Seattle - 82%
8. Chicago - 81%
9. Philadelphia - 81%
10. St. Louis - 80%

For the record, since they've been talked about a bit in this thread, New York is 79% liberal, Los Angeles is 74%, Portland is 76%, Madison is 75% and Denver is 70%. I was surprised by quite a few of the cities that weren't as liberal as I expected like Las Vegas, Miami, and Honolulu. Just for the heck of it, here are the 10 most liberal cities with a population over 100,000 (percentages not included because I'm lazy):

1. Detroit
2. Gary, Indiana
3. Berkeley, California
4. Washington, DC
5. Oakland
6. Inglewood, California
7. Newark, New Jersey
8. Cambridge, Massachusetts
9. San Francisco
10. Flint, Michigan

I posted the top conservative cities' list in that thread. For the record, there are many more large liberal cities than there are conservative although that may go without saying, and the liberal cities are much more liberal than the conservative cities are conservative. If you want to view the full report, showing where all the cities stand, check out this link, but as a warning, it's a pdf file so you must have Adobe Acrobat Reader on your computer and the report is huge, over 40 pages, so it may take awhile, or kill some slow computers. It's interesting to see where cities stack up:

http://alt.coxnewsweb.com/statesman/...081205libs.pdf
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Old 06-03-2007, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Portland, OR
42 posts, read 56,265 times
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Well, in terms of red vs. blue, I would just have to say that most (not all) liberal cities have a much higher quality of life than their conservative counterparts. However, I have to agree with you Houstoner, it's really not the end-all of a city whether it is liberal or conservative in it's voting patterns. For me, I will always tend to go with a more liberal city because in most cases they tend to have a much more open-minded population, and a much better outlook towards social causes. They also tend to be much greener, and have a lot less rednecks, which makes a big difference to me.
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Old 06-04-2007, 08:03 AM
 
7,968 posts, read 18,087,474 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dullnboring View Post
I just recently found the link to a report that details the political demography of our nation's large cities and ranks them on their liberalness and conservativeness....
There's some flaws in this system of tabulation, largely on the liberal side in my opinion as it equates Democrat with liberal which isn't always the case (nor is Republican and conservative, but I feel the difference is more pronounced with Democrat/liberal) in the sense that many of the cities that came out on top like Detroit, have high minority populations, which while they vote overwhelmingly Democrat, actually are fairly socially conservative. Ditto for the cities with a strong tradition of labor unions.
Dulln-notboring ,

Thanks for sharing that report. I agree with you that there are many heavily Democratic cities whose citizens, beyond minority rights and labor union issues, are rather socially conservative. That's definitely the case in my hometown of Philly which made the cut on one of your lists.

If I were a aspiring Republican local candidate ( shudder the thought ), I would do what Bush did with modest success: court the minority church community by emphasizing socially conservative issues. Obviously the GOP embracing unions would be like trying to establish the labor version of the Log Cabin Republicans.
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Old 06-04-2007, 01:40 PM
 
1,008 posts, read 3,732,076 times
Reputation: 249
Thanks for the info dullnboring....Good stuff. Just to add my 2 cents, politics on both sides of the fence can be rather complicated. For instance you can have a Democratic mayor who leans "conservatively" and a Republican who leans liberally towards social issues.

My personal preference is a society similar to the Netherlands which has a mix of all political views but heavily leans towards the far left in its social outlook and tolerance for varied behaviors. In the end, you have to select a city that feels most right for you.
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Old 06-04-2007, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
644 posts, read 3,110,137 times
Reputation: 334
Off the top of my head:

Providence, RI
Burlington, VT
Sante Fe, NM
Northampton, MA
Asheville, NC
Durham, NC
Lawrence, KS
Eugene, OR
Ithica, NY
Boulder, CO
Portsmouth, NH
Madison, WI
Austin, TX
Marfa, TX
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Old 06-04-2007, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
644 posts, read 3,110,137 times
Reputation: 334
Quote:
Originally Posted by avantgarden View Post
I wouldn't exactly call Houston liberal. Yes, Dallas is liberal with quite a base of liberal voters, but the majority of Houston voted for Bush. I am not saying Houston is conservative, and I imagine there are pockets of Houston that are far-left, just as there are in any city. However, overall, the city leans more towards moderate, which many would deem a good thing
Houston and Dallas are not liberal.
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