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Old 09-24-2007, 05:38 AM
 
Location: City of Bridges
214 posts, read 182,705 times
Reputation: 23

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MileHighSigh View Post
It all depends on what you mean by bland. But I think Denver would fit the criteria.
Agreed. Denver has five points, and Capitol Hill which are right out of downtown, and considered part of the center city. They have some city characteristics, five points more then Capitol Hill. However, once you walk out of the Cheesman park area, and go to Country Club, all of North Denver, most of South Denver, it feels like a suburbs. The City's neighborhoods don't change that much. They slowly change. Nothing compared to Northeast and Great Lake cities like Boston, Philly, Pittsburgh, Clevelands, etc.
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Old 09-24-2007, 10:03 AM
 
Location: yeah
5,716 posts, read 14,567,378 times
Reputation: 2829
any place with tons of new development where character has yet to be molded
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Old 09-24-2007, 10:06 AM
 
Location: NE PA
7,936 posts, read 13,859,513 times
Reputation: 4382
Cary, NC sticks out in my head as bland, sprawling character-less cul-de-sacs of boring new subdivisions. Probably most newer suburbs of bigger cities fit this description.
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Old 09-24-2007, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Orange, California
1,573 posts, read 5,649,113 times
Reputation: 720
Default Ashburn, VA

Once upon a time, 25 years ago, Ashburn, VA was a pretty, green, rural/farm area, just beyond the outer limits of the DC suburbs. Today, it is a completely subdivided, sterile, virtually treeless place. I have a friend who describes it as "soul-less" and I think that is apt. There are lots of shiny new restaurants and big box retail stores to complement the shiny new housing and townhome developments. I guess every city seems to have suburbs like this, but the thing about Ashburn is that it will cost you twice what the same characterless suburban living will cost you in Houston, Dallas, Atlanta, Charlotte, etc, and it will feel NO different.
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Old 09-24-2007, 11:04 AM
 
Location: City of Bridges
214 posts, read 182,705 times
Reputation: 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by goozer View Post
Once upon a time, 25 years ago, Ashburn, VA was a pretty, green, rural/farm area, just beyond the outer limits of the DC suburbs. Today, it is a completely subdivided, sterile, virtually treeless place. I have a friend who describes it as "soul-less" and I think that is apt. There are lots of shiny new restaurants and big box retail stores to complement the shiny new housing and townhome developments. I guess every city seems to have suburbs like this, but the thing about Ashburn is that it will cost you twice what the same characterless suburban living will cost you in Houston, Dallas, Atlanta, Charlotte, etc, and it will feel NO different.
I always find it strange that most American's feel they don't make it until they own their two car garage house in everywhereville America. I want a house in an old neighborhood to fix up and make nicer for a family after me.
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Old 09-24-2007, 08:26 PM
 
5,857 posts, read 14,043,096 times
Reputation: 3482
Quote:
Originally Posted by RowJimmy View Post
I always find it strange that most American's feel they don't make it until they own their two car garage house in everywhereville America. I want a house in an old neighborhood to fix up and make nicer for a family after me.
Two car garage? He//, 3-car is the standard in the burbs in my area.
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Old 09-25-2007, 01:15 PM
 
Location: NJ
12,284 posts, read 31,756,657 times
Reputation: 5220
Quote:
Originally Posted by RowJimmy View Post
I always find it strange that most American's feel they don't make it until they own their two car garage house in everywhereville America. I want a house in an old neighborhood to fix up and make nicer for a family after me.
a lot of times, most people are priced out of those old neighborhoods, and/or the schools aren't up to par.
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Old 09-25-2007, 02:30 PM
 
180 posts, read 204,653 times
Reputation: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by pwright1 View Post
In some of Dallas and Atlanta's older neighborhoods I find them some of the most beautiful architecturally with lots of charm and character.
Good answer...suburban communities would have more bland, cookie-cutter type construction, but many people associate entire cities with that look. Sunbelt cities have old neighborhoods full of victorians, craftmans, queen annes, bungalows, colonials, tudors, etc. just like any other city founded prior to 1970.
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Old 09-25-2007, 02:58 PM
 
2,506 posts, read 7,755,794 times
Reputation: 828
Every city in the country founded before 1950 has nice houses, somewhere. However, if you take a city with 100,000 people, and 40 years later it has four million, you tend not to notice the few houses that remain. It isn't their existance that matters, it is their numbers relative to what exists now.
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Old 09-25-2007, 03:28 PM
 
180 posts, read 204,653 times
Reputation: 29
But keep in mind that most of the new construction is suburban and actually located in separate cities from the main metro city. I wouldn't really associate a new subdivision in a small-town suburb located 50 miles from Downtown with the style of homes in that particular city. I would think more about the houses within the actual city and link the in-town style with that city. In-town neighborhoods are much more representative of the true city than suburban ones...
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