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Old 06-07-2007, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
832 posts, read 3,558,088 times
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San Francisco is great
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Old 06-07-2007, 07:25 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 24 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,663,662 times
Reputation: 33083
Quote:
Originally Posted by MileHighSigh View Post
Denver is definitely NOT a city of unique and interesting neighborhoods. There's maybe, oh, three?

Sorry. Suburbia, Wal Mart, and the megachurch are in the drivers seat in Denver.

Unique? Every city is unique. There are no 'identical twin' cities. Interesting neighborhoods? I can name many: west side: Sloan's Lake, Berekely, Highland; east side: Capitol Hill, Washington Park, DU; that is just for starts. A RAND corp study ranked Denver one of the lesser-suburbanized cities.

Quote:
Regions that had the worst suburban sprawl include: the Riverside-San Bernardino region of California; Atlanta; Winston-Salem, N.C.; West Palm Beach, Fla.; Bridgeport-Danbury-Stamford, Conn.; Knoxville, Tenn.; Rochester, N.Y.; and Detroit.

Regions with the least amount of suburban sprawl include: New York City; San Francisco; Boston; Portland, Ore.; Miami; Denver; Chicago; and Milwaukee.
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Old 06-07-2007, 07:27 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 24 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,663,662 times
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Quote:
New Orleans might be a contender too, but I've never been there so I can't comment first hand.
That is something different on this forum! LOL!
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Old 01-10-2009, 07:07 PM
 
5 posts, read 10,406 times
Reputation: 10
Boston, MA, definitely.
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Old 01-11-2009, 12:57 AM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,698,355 times
Reputation: 7281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vagus View Post
Basically, the bigger, older, and more immigrant-influenced the city, the more interesting areas you will find.

Personally, I'd say NY wins this one hands down, with maybe Chicago, Boston, Philly and SF as runners-up. New Orleans might be a contender too, but I've never been there so I can't comment first hand.
You list SF, but not NO!?!?
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Old 01-11-2009, 01:08 AM
 
Location: Teaneck, NJ
1,576 posts, read 5,139,344 times
Reputation: 683
Jersey City i would say has a lot of various parts of its city for it having a population under 300,000. It has 4 or 5 neighborhoods throughout and every one has it's own uniqueness to it. The city is rich in history too and as far as culture goes, i would say Jersey City takes the blue ribbon. Jersey city is almost equally mixed with Black, Hispanic, White, And Asian. And all sorts of nationalities in between. I love JC, i lived there through my college years.
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Old 01-11-2009, 01:48 AM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,280,512 times
Reputation: 2785
Every city has unique and interesting neighborhoods. Cities with sprawling suburbs aren't ONLY sprawling suburbs - that is only one aspect of a city. Any large urban area that has been around for a century or so will have dozens of beautiful historic neighborhoods. But it's really difficult to know this for sure without spending time in a city and really experiencing what it has to offer...including its unique and interesting hoods.
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Old 01-11-2009, 02:27 AM
 
3,680 posts, read 8,849,821 times
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I like Atlanta's mix of neighborhoods. You have the affluent neighborhood of Buckhead, the urban neighborhood of Midtown with it's skycrapers, parks, and musuems, Downtown with it's architecture and tourist spots, Little Five Points with the alternative crowd, classy Virginia-Highland with it's cafes and taverns, Grant Park, Historic King District, and plenty of other neighborhoods to mention.
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Old 01-11-2009, 02:54 AM
 
Location: Oak Park, IL
5,522 posts, read 12,294,648 times
Reputation: 3827
America stopped making unique neighborhoods after WW2. Mass production, standardization, and zoning regulations have resulted in a relatively uniform built environment in post-war neighborhoods.
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Old 01-11-2009, 04:31 AM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,280,512 times
Reputation: 2785
Quote:
Originally Posted by SEAandATL View Post
I like Atlanta's mix of neighborhoods. You have the affluent neighborhood of Buckhead, the urban neighborhood of Midtown with it's skycrapers, parks, and musuems, Downtown with it's architecture and tourist spots, Little Five Points with the alternative crowd, classy Virginia-Highland with it's cafes and taverns, Grant Park, Historic King District, and plenty of other neighborhoods to mention.
And in reality, Buckhead and Midtown are not neighborhoods. There are tons of neighborhoods that make up both of these areas. Midtown is actually the historic neighborhood that begins at 10th Street/Piedmont Park and goes to Ponce de Leon Ave.

The Midtown area consists of neighborhoods like Piedmont Heights, Home Park, Ansley Park, Morningside, Atlantic Station, Loring Heights, Midtown (of course), etc. The Buckhead area neighborhoods are Brookwood, Chastain, Garden Hills, Collier Hills, Moore's Mill, Mount Paran, Peachtree Battle, West Paces, Peachtree Hills, Buckhead (of course), etc. The Downtown vicinity has neighborhoods like Old Fourth Ward, Edgewood, Candler Park, Reynoldstown, Summerhill, Castleberry Hill, the Marietta Corridor, Fairlie-Poplar, Sweet Auburn, Five Points, Downtown (of course), etc.

Some of Atlanta's most interesting neighborhoods IMO are Cabbagetown, Old Fourth Ward, Edgewood, Inman Park, Castleberry Hill, Kirkwood, Marietta Street, and others in that general vicinity.
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