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Old 06-11-2007, 02:13 PM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,932,344 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Last time I was there (many years ago, admittedly), KC had a large downtown with a traditional "city" feel to it, sprawl notwithstanding,
Actually, their is some downtown redevelopment happening in Kansas City, Missouri. They are calling some of the redeveloping areas "The Power and Light District." However, almost all of the population growth in the metro area over the past several decades have been in the suburban areas on the edge of the city. For example, Olathe Kansas on the southwest side of the KC metro had about 25,000 residents in the 1970s. Today the city has over 115,000 residents. You can only imagine the shock of some people visiting the metro area if they have not seen it in 15-20 years. The low-density sprawl consumes large amounts of land and many of the ugly cookie cutter houses they are building have no landscaping because they were all developed in the middle of a corn field. I-435 is the major highway that loops around the entire KC meto. On some parts of the highway their are 10 lanes of traffic going each direction. Bad urban planning has resulted in neighborhoods being built too close to the highways and not allowing enough of a buffer zone between the highways and the residential neighborhoods. Of course, some of the neighborhoods were built even before the major interstates were added.
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Old 06-19-2007, 08:42 AM
JJG
 
Location: Fort Worth
13,247 posts, read 19,171,479 times
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Fort Worth,TX feels like the most suburban city because it's right next to Dallas. It's the 19th largest city in the country...yet most of you can't say Fort Worth without metioning Dallas-as you mentioned earlier.

But really, the #1 big city that feels like a real suburb is none other than San Jose, CA. It's bigger than San Fransico and Oakland, but it carries the nickname, "The World's Largest Suburb"

I wouldn't count Phoenix. Any city with over a million people doesn't feel like anything close to a suburb.
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Old 06-19-2007, 11:03 AM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
4,486 posts, read 15,278,657 times
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Quote:
I wouldn't count Phoenix. Any city with over a million people doesn't feel like anything close to a suburb.
Well compared to other cities Phoenix is quite sprawled-out. The downtown area is small filled with mid-rises and low-rises but the city of Phoenix undergoing a project to try and urbanize and reinvigorate downtown. It's helping some but not as much as was hoped. Downtown Phoenix is actually a pretty nice place, there isn't much crime and the it seems pretty clean but most residents of Phoenix like the suburb-type atmosphere as do I.

Some other cities that feel like a large suburb would be:

Sioux City, IA
Sioux Falls, SD
Columbus, OH
Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN
Oklahoma City, OK
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Old 06-19-2007, 05:55 PM
 
Location: yeah
5,716 posts, read 14,567,378 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JJG View Post
But really, the #1 big city that feels like a real suburb is none other than San Jose, CA. It's bigger than San Fransico and Oakland, but it carries the nickname, "The World's Largest Suburb"
San Franciscans (and their toadies in Berkeley) are the ones who say that. San Jose is like most other Californian cities, so it's impossible to pick one city from the lot.
Quote:
Originally Posted by JJG View Post
I wouldn't count Phoenix. Any city with over a million people doesn't feel like anything close to a suburb.
But a city with over 970,000 does?
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Old 06-19-2007, 06:12 PM
 
833 posts, read 4,454,654 times
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Default ultimate suburb

Virginia Beach. Some authors have written about this city and its anti-bike and anti-pedestrian culture. The sprawl is uncontrolled and it is strip mall after strip mall. There's virtually no grid system at all, no effective mass transportation (this is the largest city in the state of VA), and you need a car to just get five blocks down a major street due to lack of sidewalks, high speeds, etc.
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Old 06-19-2007, 06:20 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,987 posts, read 102,540,351 times
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M Type X:
Quote:
I would presume that Kansas City and Omaha would outrank Columbus and Indianapolis. Did anyone mention Minneapolis yet?
Outrank, how? Omaha has old neighborhoods; my husband's high school (Central) celebrated its 100th year as a high school and before that it was the Nebraska state capitol building. Omaha doesn't seem any more suburbanized to me than the average city (whatever that is).
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Old 06-19-2007, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Chicago
38,690 posts, read 89,169,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Plains10 View Post
Kansas City is extremely suburban. In fact, the city sprawls so much that it consumes hundreds of square miles of land. The KC metro stretches on both sides of the state line and the suburban sprawl is crazy for a city of its size.
But at least Kansas City has an urban core complete with a skyline, albeit kind of a small one. I'm on board with the folks who say Phoenix. Phoenix has no urban core at all. The whole damn city looks like a flat version of Orange County. The major difference is that the KC metro area's growth is now outside the city bounaries. With Phoenix, the city just kept annexing the growth all around it, meaning the city itself comprises a huge portion of the metro area and almost all of it is very suburban in nature. Accordingly, large portions of Phoenix that would have been separate suburbs had the region developed in a more traditional "city/suburb" setting are instead part of the city proper.

Last edited by Drover; 06-19-2007 at 06:39 PM..
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Old 06-19-2007, 06:33 PM
 
Location: Chicago
38,690 posts, read 89,169,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JJG View Post
I wouldn't count Phoenix. Any city with over a million people doesn't feel like anything close to a suburb.
If feels no different than any other contiguous suburban area with over a million people. The only difference is it's all under one municipal government instead of several.
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Old 06-19-2007, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Richmond
1,489 posts, read 8,122,019 times
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Washington,D.C. !

Gosh, I swear. People commute from as far away as Pennsylvania and the DC suburbs swallowed half of Virginia. In 10 years I wouldn't be surprised if Raleigh, NC was part of the D.C. region.
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Old 06-19-2007, 09:21 PM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,932,344 times
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Post Kansas City

Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
But at least Kansas City has an urban core complete with a skyline, albeit kind of a small one. I'm on board with the folks who say Phoenix. Phoenix has no urban core at all. The whole damn city looks like a flat version of Orange County. The major difference is that the KC metro area's growth is now outside the city bounaries. With Phoenix, the city just kept annexing the growth all around it, meaning the city itself comprises a huge portion of the metro area and almost all of it is very suburban in nature. Accordingly, large portions of Phoenix that would have been separate suburbs had the region developed in a more traditional "city/suburb" setting are instead part of the city proper.
Yes, Kansas City does have an urban core but the population has been declining for years in many of the densely settled areas. The city has annexed land north of the Missouri River and this is called the "northland." Also, Kansas City International Airport is in Platte County Missouri (northwest of downtown), and the placement of the airport there has generated suburban sprawl growth well north of the city in the past 10-20 years. The total amount of square miles for Kansas City, MO proper is over 300 sq miles. The population density is very low for a big city with only around 1000-1500 people per square mile. In comparisson, the population density of Omaha, Nebraska is much higher. The St. Louis metro is much bigger population wise compared with Kansas City, but I think that the KC metro has an even bigger sprawl problem because the consumption of land is greater for a city that has a smaller population. The next time you visit KC make sure you check out all of the suburban sprawl and construction taking place in Johnson County Kansas on the southwest side of the metro area. A friend visited the area for the first time in 20 years and could not believe how crowded and conjested the area had become in a short period of time along with the upgrades to the highway to 8 lanes on the I-435 beltway.
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