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Old 06-08-2007, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Nashville
81 posts, read 296,810 times
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What is the most stereotypically suburban large city in the US?
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Old 06-08-2007, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
20,005 posts, read 69,394,911 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DefaultAlias View Post
What is the most stereotypically suburban large city in the US?
Id take a stab and say Phoenix. Suburbia hell in every direction, spanning immense areas of land.
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Old 06-08-2007, 03:08 PM
 
16,092 posts, read 36,568,487 times
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It doesn't even have a downtown...
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Old 06-08-2007, 03:10 PM
 
Location: In exile, plotting my coup
2,408 posts, read 13,359,561 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve-o View Post
Id take a stab and say Phoenix. Suburbia hell in every direction, spanning immense areas of land.
I'll co-sign on that.

Beyond a smattering of tallish buildings along Central Avenue that allegedly designate "downtown Phoenix", a low-density area devoid of street retail, pedestrians and activity after the workday ends, there really is nothing remotely resembling a traditional city there. The only slightly urban area is along Mill Avenue, and that's in Tempe, a "suburb" and even that is only a small stretch.
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Old 06-08-2007, 04:15 PM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,937,611 times
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Kansas City is extremely suburban. In fact, the city sprawls so much that it consumes hundreds of square miles of land. The KC metro stretches on both sides of the state line and the suburban sprawl is crazy for a city of its size.
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Old 06-08-2007, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Katy-zuela
4,852 posts, read 8,990,543 times
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Dallas-Fort Worth? But Baltimore-D.C. is the Los Angeles of the East.
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Old 06-08-2007, 04:35 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,608 posts, read 20,712,630 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve-o View Post
Id take a stab and say Phoenix. Suburbia hell in every direction, spanning immense areas of land.
Again, I'll agree with Phoenix, although, Steve-o (we go back and forth a lot here, alternatively agreeing/disagreeing), I'd take the loaded "suburbia hell" terms out of it. It's "suburbia" in the sense that it's low-rise, new, and auto-mobile oriented. But even areas that were 100% suburban, sprawled out on the edge of town when brand new, eventually, over the years, become a lot more gridded in, filled in, with all the familar urban problems (crime, etc), as well as more unique mom-and-pop stores opening up once the strip malls start declining from their initial high-profile tenants. Phoenix is actually becoming more dense over time, not less dense. That's because once the initial leapfrogging sprawl occurs, there are still little parcels of land left over for sometimes years at a time, which eventually do become developed. For ex, I'm living in Tempe in an apt complex built in the 1980s, that is surrounded mainly by 1960s era neighborhoods. Just down the road there are several 1990s era condo projects, and a new strip mall and pharmacy under construction, even though this is considered practically the inner city compared to where must new construction in Phoenix occurs. The trend over time is for denser development, even in "suburbia"; new home subdivisions are on smaller pieces of land and packed together more tightly than 1960s era homes.
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Old 06-08-2007, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,635 posts, read 27,047,623 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KerrTown View Post
Dallas-Fort Worth?.
It doesn't touch Phoenix in this category. Dallas at least has a pretty nice sized downtown with some dense gridded neighborhoods.
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Old 06-08-2007, 05:47 PM
 
Location: NJ
12,284 posts, read 31,759,606 times
Reputation: 5220
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plains10 View Post
Kansas City is extremely suburban. In fact, the city sprawls so much that it consumes hundreds of square miles of land. The KC metro stretches on both sides of the state line and the suburban sprawl is crazy for a city of its size.
I've never been to KC, but have a friend who lives there. It's shocking to me that she lives in the middle of the WOODS, yet still lives in KC proper - it's almost like how can this even be a city?
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Old 06-08-2007, 06:39 PM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,937,611 times
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Post Kansas City Metro

Quote:
Originally Posted by tahiti View Post
I've never been to KC, but have a friend who lives there. It's shocking to me that she lives in the middle of the WOODS, yet still lives in KC proper - it's almost like how can this even be a city?
It does not feel like a large city because the population density of the KC metro is very spread out. The population growth in the city of Kansas City, Missouri has been stagnant as the suburban sprawl has developed in all directions outside of the city limits. An example would be Overland Park and Olathe on the Kansas side of the KC metro has 1.5 times as many people compared with Kansas City, KS which is located in the urban core. KC put the international airport out in the middle of nowhere in the 1970s and now the suburban sprawl has caught up with the airport as the city continues to annex more land to the city limits. The area north of Kansas City, MO is known as the "northland." The county with the strongest economy in the KC metro is Johnson County Kansas. This county had very strong economic growth in the 1990s with a little slower growth in the 21st century. However, it is one of the wealthiest counties in the country with an average median income approaching $70,000 as of 2004 in a county with over 510,000 people. The total population for the metro is over 1.5 million which is slightly smaller than the St. Louis metro.
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