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View Poll Results: Washington DC: Southern, Northern, or No Man's Land?
Northern City with Southern Overtones 13 33.33%
Southern city with Northern Overtones 4 10.26%
A hybrid of both 13 33.33%
No Man's Land- its neither duck nor pond. 9 23.08%
Voters: 39. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 11-04-2009, 10:45 PM
 
Location: Germantown, MD
1,359 posts, read 3,275,927 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Immediately, no. The more you get into it, yes. Alexandria and Arlington does not feel Southern whatsoever. Large parts of Fairfax County doesn't either. When you enter Prince William, that's when you feel you're getting into the South. But not Arlington, Fairfax, and Alexandria does not feel Southern.
Exactly. Prince William is where the South begins, F'burg to be exact.
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Old 11-04-2009, 11:06 PM
 
Location: Metro Atlanta & Savannah, GA - Corpus Christi, TX
4,471 posts, read 7,286,802 times
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I agree. The south doesn't really begin until you're in the exurbs of DC; Fredericksburg-Spotsylvania County area and points south.

I would classify DC METRO as a hybrid of both. DC itself, (I'm going to include Fairfax, Alexandria and Arlington in this because they might as well be in the District) seem more northern.
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Old 11-05-2009, 11:56 AM
 
Location: the future
1,817 posts, read 3,433,767 times
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Exclamation boredatwork

Quote:
Originally Posted by DC's Finest View Post
Bored, your statement doesn't add up. People from NYC to NO say young. Baltimore people say dug for dog. If that isn't country then I don't what is. All black people have southern roots. AA Philly people have a twang in their accent too. When they go to NYC, people say they talk country. I think DC's accent is Mid Atlantic. If you listen to Allen Iverson or Martin Lawrence or Tariji P. Henson, they sound similar.

Is there anyone here from NEW YORK or ANYWHERE else that says "young" instead of "yo"in their vocabulary? ...they may say youngin for somebody younger in age but not as a pronoun like we use it..........never ever heard of that outside D.C/ MD its exclusive....I dont know WHAT you're talkin bout unless somebody can say otherwise
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Old 11-05-2009, 12:31 PM
 
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DC is a Mid-Atlantic city along with Baltimore. I really get upset when people refer to themselves as Northeast individuals when they live in DC. I lived there for many years -- and it certainly is NOT Northeast.. a few influences? Sure.

Prince George's seems more southern to me.. But areas like Arlington or Fairfax are more northern. Although, you still see college-aged kids wearing polos, sperry shoes, khaki shorts, and that characteristically southern long hair.
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Old 11-05-2009, 05:13 PM
 
Location: Germantown, MD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WeSoHood View Post
DC is a Mid-Atlantic city along with Baltimore. I really get upset when people refer to themselves as Northeast individuals when they live in DC. I lived there for many years -- and it certainly is NOT Northeast.. a few influences? Sure.

Prince George's seems more southern to me.. But areas like Arlington or Fairfax are more northern. Although, you still see college-aged kids wearing polos, sperry shoes, khaki shorts, and that characteristically southern long hair.
The Mid-Atlantic isn't a distinct cultural region. It's just what the media and some organizations classify DC/MD/DE/PA as. PG County Southern? lol No. Arlington besides every other street/school being named after Confederate generals is "Northern." I guess Fairfax leans that way too. Now Prince William County (perhaps that's what you meant) is the most "Southern" county in the DC Area.

Last edited by cpterp; 11-05-2009 at 06:34 PM..
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Old 11-05-2009, 05:48 PM
 
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You have to understand what is southern to you, is different then me.. I moved to DC from the west coast.
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Old 11-06-2009, 08:58 AM
 
Location: metro ATL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpterp View Post
The Mid-Atlantic isn't a distinct cultural region. It's just what the media and some organizations classify DC/MD/DE/PA as.
I think it is, to less of an extent than the way we define the North and the South. The mid-Atlantic is where South meets North and you get something of a hybrid of the two. It's more "Northern lite" with a touch of Southern influences.
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Old 11-06-2009, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Germantown, MD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
I think it is, to less of an extent than the way we define the North and the South. The mid-Atlantic is where South meets North and you get something of a hybrid of the two. It's more "Northern lite" with a touch of Southern influences.
Okay yes, I guess that would be a good way to explain it--a combination of the two and still more Northern, unless Virginia and West Virginia are included.
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Old 11-06-2009, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,627 posts, read 27,042,193 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WeSoHood View Post
You have to understand what is southern to you, is different then me.. I moved to DC from the west coast.
I moved to DC from the South and PG County is not the South. There are some Northern and Southern traits in PG County.
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Old 11-24-2009, 08:30 AM
 
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Being born and raised in D.C., and having lived and traveled the south, I would say D.C. is a good mixture of both. Get outside of the federal city and one will notice that the natives of D.C. have southern influences in how they live. Dont forget that D.C. is populated by mostly govt. workers that are not from the area originally. This includes Northern Virginia also. I consider myself from the upper south.
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