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View Poll Results: Washington DC: Southern, Northern, or No Man's Land?
Northern City with Southern Overtones 13 33.33%
Southern city with Northern Overtones 4 10.26%
A hybrid of both 13 33.33%
No Man's Land- its neither duck nor pond. 9 23.08%
Voters: 39. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 11-24-2009, 10:01 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,978 posts, read 3,448,313 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WeSoHood View Post
DC is a Mid-Atlantic city along with Baltimore. I really get upset when people refer to themselves as Northeast individuals when they live in DC. I lived there for many years -- and it certainly is NOT Northeast.. a few influences? Sure.

Prince George's seems more southern to me.. But areas like Arlington or Fairfax are more northern. Although, you still see college-aged kids wearing polos, sperry shoes, khaki shorts, and that characteristically southern long hair.

Your confusing urban with northern, just because Arlington is more urban with skyscrapers and more density doesn't make it more northern than PG. Growing up in the DMV area, this place is definitely not the South, no one in this area refers to themselves as Southern, whenever I meet a person from the south they are happy to claim themselves as Southerners, which is the true determinate of what the people in that area truly are. I wouldn't say its "Up north" which is historically how we refer to those from NY or Jersey, but it's a lot more like that, than it is North Carolina, Georgia, or Louisiana. When I go West or to the Midwest people look at this area as East Coast not north or south, If you ask someone in LA what they consider the south they'll say Atlanta somewhere.
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Old 11-25-2009, 06:09 AM
 
4,953 posts, read 8,534,203 times
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Good Post^^^^^ Weso thinks Cleveland is more fast paced than DC? WTF? Plus coming from the West Coast you can understand southern more than anyone. All AA's out there are from Mississippi and Louisiana.

Last edited by DC's Finest; 11-25-2009 at 06:11 AM.. Reason: P
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Old 02-14-2010, 12:11 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,247 posts, read 26,214,003 times
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DC is certainly more southern than northern. For one, the Washington Redskins fight song used to contain the words "fight for old Dixie." They changed it to "fight for old DC." Route 1 in Alexandria is called the Jefferson Davis Highway. If you travel down Highway 210 (Indian Head Highway) in Maryland, you'll see places that boast "the best BBQ in Dixie." And for goodness sake, you see people wearing seersuckers here and drinking mint juleps.The region also lacks the defining characteristics of a northern city. Boston, NY, and Philly all have these in common.1. Heavy early 20th century immigration from Europe (Irish, Italians, Greeks, etc) 2. Heavy industry and strong union presence3. Machine politics 4. Dunkin Donuts5. Distinctive accent (although Philly doesn't really have that distinctive an accent, nearly everyone says "getda****outtahere." I can't think of any colloqualisms specific to the DC region)Baltimore, I think, has more of a northern feel to it than DC. But it's way too sleepy to be a northern city.
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Old 02-14-2010, 04:41 AM
 
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Northern in the same way that Cincinnati & St. Louis are Northern. There are some Southern characteristics (moreso in the African American community) and the South is really close by, but it's still in the North nevertheless. You gotta draw the line somwhere. I have a friend from NOVA who moved to Memphis and he says the culture is completely different. He considers NOVA the North, and says that most people there don't identify as Southern
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Old 02-14-2010, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Fort Worth, TX
9,397 posts, read 13,681,035 times
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I think it's about as southern as San Francisco. Granted I haven't lived in the South, but I've got a general idea of what it's like there.

Yeah there are some elements of the South but that doesn't make it southern. People here are very left-leaning, they aren't the friendliest, and it's a very high-paced area. People for the most part don't seem laid back at all.
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Old 02-14-2010, 12:38 PM
 
Location: moving again
4,382 posts, read 15,318,981 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
DC is certainly more southern than northern. For one, the Washington Redskins fight song used to contain the words "fight for old Dixie." They changed it to "fight for old DC." Route 1 in Alexandria is called the Jefferson Davis Highway. If you travel down Highway 210 (Indian Head Highway) in Maryland, you'll see places that boast "the best BBQ in Dixie." And for goodness sake, you see people wearing seersuckers here and drinking mint juleps.The region also lacks the defining characteristics of a northern city. Boston, NY, and Philly all have these in common.1. Heavy early 20th century immigration from Europe (Irish, Italians, Greeks, etc) 2. Heavy industry and strong union presence3. Machine politics 4. Dunkin Donuts5. Distinctive accent (although Philly doesn't really have that distinctive an accent, nearly everyone says "getda****outtahere." I can't think of any colloqualisms specific to the DC region)Baltimore, I think, has more of a northern feel to it than DC. But it's way too sleepy to be a northern city.
Well, You got the dunkin doughnuts wrong! haha There are 5 in DC and countless others in its metro

As for Baltimore, all those characteristics you named for the NE fit there. I don't think it's so sleepy though
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Old 02-14-2010, 02:05 PM
 
3,597 posts, read 7,703,015 times
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It's the south to me. As a lifelong Northerner, I've judged thusly.

Although with the concentration of northerners and the thin veneer of civilization in the area... How does that expression go? Northern hospitality and southern service?
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Old 02-14-2010, 03:43 PM
 
Location: 602/520
2,441 posts, read 6,118,248 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
Northern in the same way that Cincinnati & St. Louis are Northern. There are some Southern characteristics (moreso in the African American community) and the South is really close by, but it's still in the North nevertheless. You gotta draw the line somwhere. I have a friend from NOVA who moved to Memphis and he says the culture is completely different. He considers NOVA the North, and says that most people there don't identify as Southern
No, DC is much more Southern than either St. Louis or Cincinnati. For one, DC is the only city that is actually south of the Mason-Dixon line. The climate of DC is much more representative of a Southern climate than St. Louis or Cincinnati (much warmer winters and hotter, more humid summers).

Unlike Cincinnati or St. Louis you do not have to drive far from DC to find vestiges of the old South. Just across the river from DC in northern Virginia you will find Robert E. Lee High School, Stonewall Jackson High School, and roads named Lee Highway and Rebel Run. That is definitely not a trait of any Northern area at all.

DMV is DEFINITELY not similar to Memphis, Charlotte, Little Rock, or Birmingham. But to think that because DMVers do not have the full out drawls of those in deep Southern cities that DC isn't Southern is ridiculous. DC is on the very thin line between north and south, but it is in NO way a Northern city.
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Old 02-14-2010, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Germantown, MD
1,359 posts, read 3,275,676 times
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I think I may have said this before, but I think DC is on the border between the North and the South, but is much more in line with the former. In the 21st century the Mason-Dixon Line is absolutely meainingless. A real cultural North/South border exists somewhere around F'burg, VA on I-95. I agree that DC certainly is no Philadelphia, or New York (Baltimore fits the bill in terms of being Philly's little bro), but it's a very unique city that still shares way more Northern qualities than Southern ones. Whatever accent DC has (none as far as I can tell), it certainly isn't "Southern."

While history, cultural demographics, industry, and even layout may not align the city with the North it certainly doesn't with the South. Things that aren't unique to the city such as:

- a relatively high population density (higher than any major city in the South, besides Miami) despite the self-imposed ban on skyscrapers
-an high abundance of row homes
-a majority Catholic population
-an excellent transit system (only New York's NYCTA Subway has a higher ridership)
-extremely liberal politics

...do in fact align the city with the North. That and the fact that the city and its suburbs in Maryland and even Virginia are undeniably an integral part of the Northeast BosWash Megapolis, further the argument. Maybe in the past it wouldn't be so readily be decribed as "Northern," but even then again it was the capital of the Union during the Civil War.

From a University of North Carolina, Center for the South poll:

"Fourteen polls, surveying a total of more than 17,000 people between 1992 and 1999 show, for example, that only 7 percent of D.C. residents responding say that they live in the South"

Keep in mind that this was 10-15 years ago, and we can all agree that DC has certainly become more "Northern" since then.

Oh yeah and someone was saying that the winters here were "warm." Maybe compared to the Upper Midwest and Northern New England, but certainly not New York or Philadelphia. It's a toss up whether New York or Philadelphia has more snow than DC, and the temperature variances between the three are usually around 1-4 degrees. I also guarantee you that now Southern state (except for maybe way up in mountainous regions) will ever experience the weather we have had this winter.
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Old 02-15-2010, 08:45 AM
 
4,953 posts, read 8,534,203 times
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Oh I love these posters who quantify DC as southern because people eat fried chicken or they saw someone with a glass of sweet tea. These are some of the most idiotic post that I have ever read!

DC is more southern than Cincinnati or St Louis? Right across the river from Cincinnatti is ****ing Kentucky? How assinine is that statement. St. Louis is way more southern than DC. For the record: DC does not have any streets or roads named after Confederate soldiers.

Banjan,

The Redskins were owned by a racist. What does that song have to do with the city? People in DC drink mint julep? WTF? My grandmother was born and raised in Brooklyn all her life and she eats grits, sweet tea, pigs feet.. etc... Go to the southside of Chicago and you will see restaurants boasting "Best Southern Food." All AA are originally from the south and still to this day have some southern culture. If you want to know what the DC accent is- Martin Lawrence and Taraji P. Henson have distinct DC accents. AA's in DC use a version of the Mid Atlantic accent. You can hear slight versions of it. Listen to Michael Vick & Allen Iverson. Also Carmelo Anthony. So, your analogy is ridiculous at best. And lastly your statement that the region lacks the defining characteristics of a northern city is crazy.

How DC is like northern cities...
Very Walkable (NYC, Boston, Philly)
Weather (NYC & Philly)
Extremely Liberal (DC votes 95% democrat in all elections/recognizes gay marriage)
Educated (Boston)
Catholic (Boston, NYC & Philly)
Diverse (NYC)
Urban (Boston, NYC & Philly)
Fast Paced (NYC & Boston)
Density (on par Boston & Philly)
Subways (Second largest Ridership in the USA)
High Cost of Living
Expensive Housing Cost (NYC & Boston)
Cosmopolitan (NYC)
High Salary & Wages (NYC & Boston)
High Public Transportation Usage (37% of the population - Second only to NYC)
Large CBD & DT workforce (Third Largest behind NYC & Chicago)
Miles and Miles of Rowhouses (Boston, Philly, Baltimore, NYC)

What southern city can claim three or four of these characterisitics??????

Last edited by DC's Finest; 02-15-2010 at 09:03 AM..
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