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View Poll Results: Washington DC: Southern, Northern, or No Man's Land?
Northern City with Southern Overtones 13 33.33%
Southern city with Northern Overtones 4 10.26%
A hybrid of both 13 33.33%
No Man's Land- its neither duck nor pond. 9 23.08%
Voters: 39. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 03-06-2010, 08:43 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,251 posts, read 26,220,119 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Billiam View Post
Baltimore has a subway.

Well, I'll be goddamned.


YouTube - Metro Transit Video: Baltimore Subway System
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Old 03-06-2010, 09:56 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,637 posts, read 27,042,193 times
Reputation: 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by DC's Finest View Post
Banjan,

Just give it up!
He won't. If anything, people in DC will consider themselves Northerners more than they would Southerners. But he will still say that DC has much more in common or sympathies with Atlanta then they do with Philadelphia. I do not know one born and bred Washingtonian that consider themselves Southerners. Let's be real, there are similarities between DC and Atlanta (both have huge black populations, political influence, very forested due to being east of the fall line and in the piedmont. Outside of that, DC has far more in common with Philadelphia and Baltimore.

Quote:
3. Yes, DC is a denser city than Atlanta. And this makes it less southern because...
It doesn't. But it helps to make it relate more to the actual region it is in. From a built environment standpoint, DC is built like the Northeast, not the South. You're not going to find consistent density like this throughout Atlanta. DC is approaching 10000 people psm. Atlanta will take a decade to get to the 5000 mark.
DC

Quote:
The District of Columbia is virtually 100% Democratic because all you have are blacks and trust fund babies. If you had to toss half of Loudoun County's population into the District, that number would not be so skewed.
Really? Well explain Boston, Portland, and Seattle. All of which are either just as liberal or more liberal than DC and all that does not have a large black population or trust fund babies, whatever that is. Not to mention that DC's black population percentage is dropping.
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Old 03-07-2010, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,251 posts, read 26,220,119 times
Reputation: 11706
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Really? Well explain Boston, Portland, and Seattle. All of which are either just as liberal or more liberal than DC and all that does not have a large black population or trust fund babies, whatever that is. Not to mention that DC's black population percentage is dropping.
What is there to explain? I said DC is virtually 100% Democratic. Democratic doesn't always mean liberal. Seattle is more liberal than DC but it is not more Democratic. You don't have to have a whole lot of black people to be Democratic or liberal, but high numbers of black people will always make a place more Democratic.

No place will ever be as Democratic as DC. Blacks vote in lockstep with the Dems and whites who work at non-profits, drive the Toyota Prius, and shop at Whole Foods tend to vote overwhelmingly Dem. Honestly, is there much more to the District than that?

Chevy Chase, Foxhall, Cleveland Park = White, established, very wealthy Obama voters

Adams Morgan, U Street, Columbia Heights = Young, educated Obama voters, poor blacks and Hispanics

Capitol Hill = Some McCain voters, young educated Obama voters

Ledroit Park/Bloomingdale = Bourgie, young black Obama voters

16th Street = Black, established and wealthy Obama voters

Everywhere else in DC = Black people
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Old 03-07-2010, 01:36 PM
 
9 posts, read 12,776 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
What is there to explain? I said DC is virtually 100% Democratic. Democratic doesn't always mean liberal. Seattle is more liberal than DC but it is not more Democratic. You don't have to have a whole lot of black people to be Democratic or liberal, but high numbers of black people will always make a place more Democratic.

No place will ever be as Democratic as DC. Blacks vote in lockstep with the Dems and whites who work at non-profits, drive the Toyota Prius, and shop at Whole Foods tend to vote overwhelmingly Dem. Honestly, is there much more to the District than that?

Chevy Chase, Foxhall, Cleveland Park = White, established, very wealthy Obama voters

Adams Morgan, U Street, Columbia Heights = Young, educated Obama voters, poor blacks and Hispanics

Capitol Hill = Some McCain voters, young educated Obama voters

Ledroit Park/Bloomingdale = Bourgie, young black Obama voters

16th Street = Black, established and wealthy Obama voters

Everywhere else in DC = Black people
Since we are gauging whether a city is northern or southern based on racial stereotypes, gas stations, and restaurant chains, here's my input - DC has no CHARM. Hence, it cannot possibly be a southern city.

There. End. Of. Story.
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Old 03-07-2010, 04:16 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,322,731 times
Reputation: 2698
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
It doesn't. But it helps to make it relate more to the actual region it is in. From a built environment standpoint, DC is built like the Northeast, not the South. You're not going to find consistent density like this throughout Atlanta. DC is approaching 10000 people psm. Atlanta will take a decade to get to the 5000 mark.
I agree with you in terms of the way DC is built, but I also think it's worth noting that a lot (certainly not all, but a lot) of this is due to the development of the Metro system, which only came about in the 1970's. The city was able to urbanize like it was after the Metro was established because it is a consummately planned city. In other words, DC shares common urban features with many Northern cities, but it doesn't really share their urban history. This is one of the reasons why I consider DC to be unique in so many respects. I'm not taking away from your point, but just wanted to add that observation.
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Old 03-07-2010, 04:35 PM
 
2,531 posts, read 5,461,578 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
I agree with you in terms of the way DC is built, but I also think it's worth noting that a lot (certainly not all, but a lot) of this is due to the development of the Metro system, which only came about in the 1970's. The city was able to urbanize like it was after the Metro was established because it is a consummately planned city. In other words, DC shares common urban features with many Northern cities, but it doesn't really share their urban history. This is one of the reasons why I consider DC to be unique in so many respects. I'm not taking away from your point, but just wanted to add that observation.
Exactly. This is why I don't think that DC can really be pigeonholed into a region, because it shares commonality with the Mid-Atlantic, the South and the Northeast. It doesn't share the history of Philly/NYC/Boston, but it shares a commonality in terms of urban features. The Metro system worked in DC precisely because Downtown at the time was the major employment center of the metro area. I don't think the Tyson's Corner edge city or the I-270 corridor didn't really affect that until the 1980's.

From a non-scientific point-of-view, I've always thought many of the Northern Virginia suburbs remind me somewhat of Atlanta with heavier Northeastern influences, whereas the Maryland suburbs of DC put me in mind of New Jersey.
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Old 03-07-2010, 06:35 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,637 posts, read 27,042,193 times
Reputation: 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
I agree with you in terms of the way DC is built, but I also think it's worth noting that a lot (certainly not all, but a lot) of this is due to the development of the Metro system, which only came about in the 1970's. The city was able to urbanize like it was after the Metro was established because it is a consummately planned city. In other words, DC shares common urban features with many Northern cities, but it doesn't really share their urban history. This is one of the reasons why I consider DC to be unique in so many respects. I'm not taking away from your point, but just wanted to add that observation.
I hear what you are saying 100% but wasn't most of the what see as DC built before the metro? I'm talking about the city itself. I know Arlington and Alexandria and all the other suburban nodes are a result of the metro. But what areas within the city was densely built because of the metro. This is something that I don't even know. I know the area around Navy Yards transformed but that was because of a stadium and it's close proximity to metro. Same with Gallery Place.
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Old 03-07-2010, 08:04 PM
 
2,531 posts, read 5,461,578 times
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Much of DC was built in the early 20th Century, right? I know the infill development in DC does use proximity to the Metro as a factor
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Old 03-07-2010, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,637 posts, read 27,042,193 times
Reputation: 9577
Yeah that's what I'm thinking. Because DC's peak population was at 800,000 and I believe it's been the same size for many decades now. When it was at 800,000 in the 1950s, the density was well around 13,000 people psm long before the metro. I think the density of the Washington suburbs is a direct result of the metro no doubt. Just wondering if that is the same for the city itself.
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Old 03-07-2010, 09:28 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,322,731 times
Reputation: 2698
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
I hear what you are saying 100% but wasn't most of the what see as DC built before the metro?
That's a tricky question. I'd say that many of the residential areas were, but not as much of the office/commercial areas, particularly the non-government buildings.
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