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View Poll Results: Washington DC: Southern, Northern, or No Man's Land?
Northern City with Southern Overtones 13 33.33%
Southern city with Northern Overtones 4 10.26%
A hybrid of both 13 33.33%
No Man's Land- its neither duck nor pond. 9 23.08%
Voters: 39. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-12-2007, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,455 posts, read 7,520,622 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vasinger View Post
Why should the "Northeast" include the Mid-Atlantic? That wouldn't make sense. The northeast is the northeast . Its not in the middle of the east coast.And the true Mid-Atlantic is really New York, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey.
The northeast a bigger region than many people let on. Geographically, it wouldn't make sense for the South to start at Maryland, either. Also, If we're going split hairs here, latitudinally PA and NJ are certainly not in the "middle" of the Eastern Seaboard.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vasinger View Post
Anyways, culturally, i think DC is much more a Southern city than Northern. These days it gets lumped in with the Northeast but I don't think thats accurate of its culture.
You can think that if you wish, but you still haven't provided any examples to the contrary. What makes DC "more Southern than Northern?"

Quote:
Originally Posted by vasinger View Post
As I said earlier, I have been to New York, Philly, and Boston (the real northeast), and those cities feel very different in their vibe from Washington D.C.
...and don't those cities reside in states you just classified as the Mid-Atlantic?

I agree with the statement that DC is different than the aforementioned, typical Northeastern cites -- but that sure doesn't make it Southern. Personally, DC reminds me more of a EUROPEAN city, if anything.
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Old 06-12-2007, 06:33 PM
 
Location: In God
3,073 posts, read 10,767,418 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vasinger View Post

And if I remember correctly, yer from Texas. So I wouldn't be talking if I were you.
Exactly. Which is why I'm not voting on this poll. Even though I had lived in the Real South (Georgia) for a couple of years, I'm from the western South so I'm not completely southern. Plus, I wasn't even born in the south (in Virginia), so. Then again, Texas may not always be considered the south, but it's down here amongst the south-south. Unlike Virginia and D.C., most of Texas shares in the southern weather, the southern cuisine, and the southern trees. There's virtually no snow down here, lol. A southern state needs to be able to claim those things. And I would not say that 9 out of 10 people consider Virginia the south. In that light, I would say that Washington, D.C. is more mid-Atlantic than anything else. Look at it's density and walkability. That's a northern attribute.
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Old 06-12-2007, 06:34 PM
 
Location: moving again
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Everyone here considers it to be The Mid Atlantic. Not northern nor southern, but more commonly of the two, its northern
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Old 06-12-2007, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Richmond
1,489 posts, read 8,123,095 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mpope409 View Post
Exactly. Which is why I'm not voting on this poll. Even though I had lived in the Real South (Georgia) for a couple of years, I'm from the western South so I'm not completely southern. Plus, I wasn't even born in the south (in Virginia), so. Then again, Texas may not always be considered the south, but it's down here amongst the south-south. Unlike Virginia and D.C., most of Texas shares in the southern weather, the southern cuisine, and the southern trees. There's virtually no snow down here, lol. A southern state needs to be able to claim those things. And I would not say that 9 out of 10 people consider Virginia the south. In that light, I would say that Washington, D.C. is more mid-Atlantic than anything else. Look at it's density and walkability. That's a northern attribute.
Texas is just more Western to me, than Southern. East Texas may be like the South, but its not like the Old South, like Virginia is.


Are you saying just because I'm from Virginia which is the Upper South and not the Deep South, that I'm not qualified to know what is Southern and what isn't?
I'm from Richmond, Virginia which is very Southern. And I know people from Georgia who say its feels more southern here than in Georgia

Virginia has a long hot humid climate, respectively, and we have magnolias and dogwood trees, and even palm trees along the coast, so I can match you there as well. We grow cotton, peanuts, tobacco, etc.

We have tons of southern cuisine, including spoonbread, which some of the most southern of southerners don't even know much about.

They get snow in Georgia and Tennessee. Does that make them not the South?

Most every southerner I know considers Virginia the South. Ironically, I know a few northerners that don't, but I guess thats their opinion.
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Old 06-12-2007, 09:41 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
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The only person I've ever heard say that Virginia is NOT in the South was from the Houston, TX area. Anyone I've met from elsewhere in the South, in the Northeast, Midwest, even Canada accept Virginia as a Southern US state. Virginia is a spectrum, though. The southern portion of the state is undeniably the South, and Richmond is its proud capital. Don't forget to stop at the Museum of the Confederacy or see the statues of Confederate soldiers on Monument Ave. But in the 110 miles between Richmond and DC, there's a shift. By the time you cross the Potomac, you're in a more Northeastern-like place.

One un-northeasternlike thing I noticed in DC today was that it's a surprisingly casual city. I was surprised to see YUP men walking around in khakis and button-downs, and YUP women in shorts and casual tops. On the Metro and walking around office buildings it was surprising to see very few people in suits.
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Old 06-12-2007, 10:10 PM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lammius View Post
One un-northeasternlike thing I noticed in DC today was that it's a surprisingly casual city. I was surprised to see YUP men walking around in khakis and button-downs, and YUP women in shorts and casual tops. On the Metro and walking around office buildings it was surprising to see very few people in suits.
Hmm. That's interesting -- I found people in DC to be VERY focused on dressing conservatively. I'm sure the summer months allows the dress code to be relaxed in many workplaces. However, if you were to come back during the winter months, you'd definitely see suits and ties galore.
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Old 06-12-2007, 10:21 PM
 
Location: In exile, plotting my coup
2,408 posts, read 13,360,355 times
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This debate has been done before and I'll just say my piece which I've said before and then high-tail it out of here as this thread is going the same endless hair-splitting direction of all the other threads of this nature.

I grew up in Northern Virginia right outside of Washington, DC and currently live here as well (but only for three more weeks thank God!) and I have met no one, not a single resident, who claims that DC is a Southern city. Most agree that it's either Mid-Atlantic (which for the record, is what I consider it), or say as others have said here that it's Northern. Also, few people I grew up with considered Northern Virginia the South. They differentiated between Northern Virginia and the rest of the state, but quite a few people didn't consider any part of the state the South, and I've heard from many people from the Deep South and from other more "Southern" in character parts of Virginia and elsewhere dismiss Northern Virginia and claim it as not being the South either. Many people feel it's less a geographical division and more cultural and that a line drawn over 150 years ago, considering all of the social changes since then, is nowadays completely arbitrary.

There. I'm done with it.
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Old 06-12-2007, 10:23 PM
 
Location: Richmond
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lammius View Post
The only person I've ever heard say that Virginia is NOT in the South was from the Houston, TX area. Anyone I've met from elsewhere in the South, in the Northeast, Midwest, even Canada accept Virginia as a Southern US state. Virginia is a spectrum, though. The southern portion of the state is undeniably the South, and Richmond is its proud capital. Don't forget to stop at the Museum of the Confederacy or see the statues of Confederate soldiers on Monument Ave. But in the 110 miles between Richmond and DC, there's a shift. By the time you cross the Potomac, you're in a more Northeastern-like place.

One un-northeasternlike thing I noticed in DC today was that it's a surprisingly casual city. I was surprised to see YUP men walking around in khakis and button-downs, and YUP women in shorts and casual tops. On the Metro and walking around office buildings it was surprising to see very few people in suits.
I agree with your statements. And ironically, us Virginians don't consider Houstoun, Texas, the South . I think that dressing casually is relative though. In the South, actually many people are very formally dressed- or at least they used to be. But the clothing choices are slightly different. Southern Gentlemen wear lighter suits- grey, navy, white, etc, never pinned stripped or black. Thats considered too New York-ish. Overcoats are rare. Southern ladies often wear hats, pearls, and dresses and lots of perfume .
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Old 06-12-2007, 10:26 PM
 
Location: Richmond
1,489 posts, read 8,123,095 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dullnboring View Post
This debate has been done before and I'll just say my piece which I've said before and then high-tail it out of here as this thread is going the same endless hair-splitting direction of all the other threads of this nature.

I grew up in Northern Virginia right outside of Washington, DC and currently live here as well (but only for three more weeks thank God!) and I have met no one, not a single resident, who claims that DC is a Southern city. Most agree that it's either Mid-Atlantic (which for the record, is what I consider it), or say as others have said here that it's Northern. Also, few people I grew up with considered Northern Virginia the South. They differentiated between Northern Virginia and the rest of the state, but quite a few people didn't consider any part of the state the South, and I've heard from many people from the Deep South and from other more "Southern" in character parts of Virginia and elsewhere dismiss Northern Virginia and claim it as not being the South either. Many people feel it's less a geographical division and more cultural and that a line drawn over 150 years ago, considering all of the social changes since then, is nowadays completely arbitrary.

There. I'm done with it.
That's because Northern Virginia is very transient. 40 years ago Northern Virginia was right different than it is today and its all relative.
I've been to parts of North Carolina that feel exactly the same way.

But the rest of Virginia is without question the South. And I don't know who you're talking to, but the Southerners I know all consider Virginia The South. Again, its not the Deep South. People keep thinking The South means way down in the briar patch of Mississippi. There are many Souths.
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Old 06-12-2007, 11:34 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Fairfaxian View Post
IMO, with the gridlock traffic, high cost of living, and international diversity of the DC and its surrounding suburbs, the DC area can be argued as having some western attributes as well, lol.
To be honest it DOES. You know Frederick County had to put a moratorium on new construction between its water supply ran out???!?!?!?!?!? This is something I would not expect outside of Las Vegas, Phoenix, or Albuqerque. Also the area is very decentralized economy a lot like LA. There's teh federal government in DC, but also major private employment centers in the Dulles Airport corridor, Tyson's Corner, downtown Bethesda and Silver Spring, etc. The traffic is also a lot like LA's.

Baltimore though is clearly a northern city, with its stagnant economy, drab brick buildings (sorry I really hate brick rowhouses....either graceful historic buildings like New Orleans and Charleston or San Francisco....or supermodern stuff like Vegas, Atlanta, Tampa, and Miami...dont' give me that ugly depressing red brick stuff) decaying warehouses and neighborhoods, etc etc.
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