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Old 06-13-2007, 09:19 PM
 
11 posts, read 43,628 times
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Maplewood, South Orange and Montclair have large communities. I live in Maplewood and we have two gay couples on our small street. I recently met a gay couple who live in Jersey City who also want to move to this area as they have a child and feel the child maybe more accepted here.

Anyway, if you need a great realtor let me know and I will pass on their contact details.
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Old 06-13-2007, 11:35 PM
 
Location: Tucson, AZ, USA
28 posts, read 201,024 times
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I have lived in different parts of Arizona for 16 years, and am currently living in Tucson. While Tucson is a lot more liberal and open minded than a few other areas in Arizona that I have lived in, it's all relative- Arizona tends to be extremely narrow minded.
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Old 06-14-2007, 08:25 AM
 
525 posts, read 2,154,646 times
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I agree strongly that Huntington IS a good bet. On the water, great town, easy drive to the city and the forks, and in my old neighborhood alone more than four gay families within a mile. I NEVER saw or heard of any problems-and frankly I would be appauled and disgusted if I had.

Indeed the pride Parade runs every year, and really I don't think many residents have a problem except that it stops traffic like every OTHER parade!

I suggest checking it out. Homes range in the high fours to the millions so there is a lot to choose from. Great night life, great shopping, great parks. Sounds like a good option to put on your list.

Good luck, be well, and enjoy!
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Old 06-16-2007, 09:04 AM
 
2,902 posts, read 9,153,561 times
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How did I miss this thread? If it still has any merit, I will post I am a young 20-something gay male in Pittsburgh and I've never had a single problem.

My boyfriend and I go out A LOT to fine restaurants, theatre, dancing, museums, the zoo etc. (we've never had a single glare or comment).

In fact, when we are together shopping and buying groceries, we get a LOT of smiles and winks from women of all ages, and it is SOOOO obvious we are a couple. So I wouldn't say the area is San Francisco or Seattle, but for whatever reason, Pittsburgh has become very progressive in terms of their understanding and mindset about gay people - it's a lot more than simply indifferent as Drover implies. My boyfriend works in retail and his company bends over backwards for him. They know about him and know about me - but Jason does so well at his job that he has been on the fast track to success in Pittsburgh. In fact, he was just promoted from a Pittsburgh recruiter to open his company's flagship store in Manhatten which opens in August. That's a REALLY big deal, and out of everyone in the world-wide company, they chose a young gay male from Pittsburgh to go.

We don't have any "gay neighborhood" but I think Drover would be floored if he knew how many gay people were in Squirrel Hill and Shadyside.

And Drover as a gay man speaking to a straight man - the majority of gay people don't want to live in an "exclusively gay area." We don't want to be ostracized or segregated from normal society - because we are normal society. The majority of gay people would much rather live and be assimilated into the same area's you want to live - safe, friendly, with good schools and nice homes etc.
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Old 06-16-2007, 03:52 PM
 
2,462 posts, read 8,055,058 times
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The majority of gay people would much rather live and be assimilated into the same area's you want to live - safe, friendly, with good schools and nice homes etc.

Then how do you account for the existence of clusters of openly homosexual people living in places like Dupont Circle in DC? And San Francisco?
The truth is that homosexual DON'T necessarily want the same things that other homebuyers/renters do. For most, good schools are not an issue, because they have no children to educate.
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Old 06-16-2007, 04:20 PM
 
Location: Chicago
38,690 posts, read 89,187,251 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boylocke View Post
How did I miss this thread? If it still has any merit, I will post I am a young 20-something gay male in Pittsburgh and I've never had a single problem.

My boyfriend and I go out A LOT to fine restaurants, theatre, dancing, museums, the zoo etc. (we've never had a single glare or comment).

In fact, when we are together shopping and buying groceries, we get a LOT of smiles and winks from women of all ages, and it is SOOOO obvious we are a couple. So I wouldn't say the area is San Francisco or Seattle, but for whatever reason, Pittsburgh has become very progressive in terms of their understanding and mindset about gay people - it's a lot more than simply indifferent as Drover implies. My boyfriend works in retail and his company bends over backwards for him. They know about him and know about me - but Jason does so well at his job that he has been on the fast track to success in Pittsburgh. In fact, he was just promoted from a Pittsburgh recruiter to open his company's flagship store in Manhatten which opens in August. That's a REALLY big deal, and out of everyone in the world-wide company, they chose a young gay male from Pittsburgh to go.

We don't have any "gay neighborhood" but I think Drover would be floored if he knew how many gay people were in Squirrel Hill and Shadyside.

And Drover as a gay man speaking to a straight man - the majority of gay people don't want to live in an "exclusively gay area." We don't want to be ostracized or segregated from normal society - because we are normal society. The majority of gay people would much rather live and be assimilated into the same area's you want to live - safe, friendly, with good schools and nice homes etc.
I guess we have different ideas of what constitutes "gay-friendly." By "gay-indifferent" I meant you don't see as many conspicuous signs of acceptance -- pink triangle stickers or rainbow flags hanging in business windows, news boxes with gay-oriented newspapers on many street corners, that kind of thing -- as you do in the places I mentioned in my earlier post. Gay institutions are just not as outwardly evident in Pittsburgh as in other cities. That's more or less what I meant.

I don't know why you thought I assumed that most gays want to live in a gay enclave; there's nothing I've said that even suggests I believe that. That said, obviously enough of them want that comfort zone that these enclaves often do form in larger cities. Maybe it's a credit to Pittsburgh that no such comfort zone is needed there; I don't know. I also don't know why you think I'd be floored if I knew how many gay people lived in Shadyside or Squirrel Hill, or if I'd even particularly care. In fact those strike me as the two most logical neighborhoods for there to be higher concentration of gays, possibly along with Oakland as well.
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Old 06-16-2007, 05:29 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
77 posts, read 260,891 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by claremarie View Post
The majority of gay people would much rather live and be assimilated into the same area's you want to live - safe, friendly, with good schools and nice homes etc.

Then how do you account for the existence of clusters of openly homosexual people living in places like Dupont Circle in DC? And San Francisco?
The truth is that homosexual DON'T necessarily want the same things that other homebuyers/renters do. For most, good schools are not an issue, because they have no children to educate.
I think you can account for it the same way that you find a majority of Chinese people living in Chinatown, Cubans in Little Havana, etc. Similar groups of people tend to live close to one another, whether by choice or convenience. But saying that Cubans don't really want to live in a white neighborhood, or Chinese don't really want to live in the suburbs is as obscure a comparison as the one that was made above.

I think that there is a great variety in any minority community. You can assume that gays and lesbians don't want to live in areas with good schools as much as you can assume that Cubans don't want to live in areas with parks and museums, or Chinese with access to good public transportation. It's tough to paint any minority community with a single brush stroke.

I am a gay male with a partner who cares quite a deal about buying a house in an area with good schools. Although we do not presently have children, if the opportunity for children presents itself, I'd like to know that we wouldn't have to pick up and move in order to have a safe, decent school to send him or her to.

I think if you did a study of what heterosexuals and homosexuals wanted as far as housing preferences the results would be about the same, all other variables being even.
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Old 06-16-2007, 06:48 PM
 
2,462 posts, read 8,055,058 times
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I think if you did a study of what heterosexuals and homosexuals wanted as far as housing preferences the results would be about the same, all other variables being even.

But all other variables aren't even. That's the point. Homosexual males rarely have children to consider, they don't have the same safety concerns that women or families with young children do, they are more likely to seek out urban rather than rural/suburban areas, they have more income at their disposal. Many of them also apparently enjoy living in areas near "gay-friendly" establishments such as bars and restaurants that cater to homosexual customers.
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Old 06-16-2007, 07:54 PM
 
82 posts, read 357,461 times
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This place is very gay friendly. There is a huge gay community so I am sure you will have no problem adjusting. That is the one good thing about Albuquerque.
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Old 06-16-2007, 07:55 PM
 
82 posts, read 357,461 times
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If you have some money then Santa Fe and Taos are even better for gay people.
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