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Old 01-22-2009, 03:19 PM
 
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Originally Posted by garmin239 View Post
Suburbs were for the upper middle class with big lots and open space? I guess I missed that memo. My suburb was built up around lower middle class blue collar persons. The lots for the most part are pretty small and the area is dense.
Sounds like East Rochester, NY, garmin.
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Old 01-22-2009, 03:42 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Sounds like East Rochester, NY, garmin.
Even more dense and working class than where I am. I'm in Irondequoit.
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Old 01-22-2009, 03:48 PM
 
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Originally Posted by garmin239 View Post
Even more dense and working class than where I am. I'm in Irondequoit.
Yeah, East Rochester was a railroad town that just happens to be a blue collar village that is surrounded by some of the most affluent suburbs of the Rochester area. East Syracuse is the same way here in Syracuse. Solvay is a Western suburb of Syracuse like that as well. It was home to an Allied Chemical plant, but still has a Steel Plant and a huge Paperboard plant, among a few others.
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Old 01-22-2009, 07:09 PM
 
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I thought this was only a Memphis thing, i guess not. Since housing prices have dropped, and nice big houses are already cheap here in TN, there are pleanty suburbs here that look upper-middle class, but the majority of the ppl that live there are low income families who managed to escape the inner city. The wealthiest neighborhoods are within the Memphis city limits and not in the suburbs.
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Old 01-23-2009, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Prepperland
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Originally Posted by Dingler View Post
What do you think of the new suburbs in America?
Suburbs are an endangered species. Inertia may drive them onward, and mindless developers may chew up land to build them, but they are soon to be extinct.

Without cheap and plentiful petroleum, their sprawl will inflict excessive costs upon those who dwell within. No matter what your income level, suburbs will make you poor.

That's why "smart money" is drawing folks back to cities.

Before petroleum's rise, there were boats and railroads.
After petroleum's demise, there will be boats and electrified railroads.
Plan accordingly.
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Old 01-23-2009, 02:39 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn
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Originally Posted by Dingler View Post
In the past the suburbs were a place to live if you were upper middle class, white and college educated and wanted to live next to people like yourself. They also were places with big lots, many trees and significant open space. This is not the case anymore.
Not quite right; suburbs were--and, for that matter, still are--for people who don't want to live in the city. They were never reserved for upper middle class whites, which is what your question implies. If people who aren't upper middle class, white, or both are now moving to the suburbs, that just shows that other people have been doing better, economically speaking, over the years.

And if you are upper middle class, white, or both, and you don't like the way suburbs look, why then move somewhere else! Fortunately, this is a large country and we aren't in any immediate danger of running out of space.
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Old 01-23-2009, 02:42 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Fred314X View Post
Not quite right; suburbs were--and, for that matter, still are--for people who don't want to live in the city. They were never reserved for upper middle class whites, which is what your question implies. If people who aren't upper middle class, white, or both are now moving to the suburbs, that just shows that other people have been doing better, economically speaking, over the years.

And if you are upper middle class, white, or both, and you don't like the way suburbs look, why then move somewhere else! Fortunately, this is a large country and we aren't in any immediate danger of running out of space.
That is an good point as I was looking last night at the demographics of census tracts in my city and I found out that some of the nicest neighborhoods are in the city and are still overwhelmingly White. I did find one neighborhood that was about 60% Black and had a very low poverty rate too. So, that does kill the stereotype of the upper middle class being strictly suburban.
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Old 01-26-2009, 12:28 AM
 
Location: Prepperland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by garmin239 View Post
Suburbs were for the upper middle class with big lots and open space? I guess I missed that memo. My suburb was built up around lower middle class blue collar persons. The lots for the most part are pretty small and the area is dense.
Suburbs before 1930, were different than suburbs after 1950.
Streetcar suburb - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The houses in a streetcar suburb were generally narrow in width compared to later homes, and Arts and Crafts movement styles like the California Bungalow and American Foursquare were most popular. ...By the 1940s, streetcar ridership had dropped dramatically, and few subdivisions were being built with streetcars or mass transit in general in mind. By the 1950s, nearly all streetcar lines had stopped running, and were instead served by buses.
The proliferation of automobiles and development tailored to them, encouraged the sprawling suburbia and strip malls that served them. But that is going to change.

Transit-oriented development - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A transit-oriented development (TOD) is a mixed-use residential or commercial area designed to maximize access to public transport, and often incorporates features to encourage transit ridership.
That's the way of the future.
Let's hope urban planners reserve plenty of park space.
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