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Old 06-15-2007, 05:58 PM
 
50 posts, read 202,898 times
Reputation: 33

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tinkertea View Post
I am native to So. California, and love it here, but want to leave because I can no longer afford to live here. It is hard to decide where to move, because I've never even been in snow (don't laugh!), so I don't know what to expect if I had to live/drive in it. But is it worse than living in a place like AZ, where it gets to 110 degrees? Or Atlanta, where the humidity is bad? The heat in Cali is a dry heat, and can get to well over 100. At that point, I'm none-to-happy. But I've never delt with humidity or snow. Which is the worse of the 3 evils...snow, heat, humidity? And there is trying to find a place with the right weather, yet has affordable housing, good job market and low crime. Denver seems to be where my research keeps taking me, but that whole "snow thing" keeps me from being 100% commited to the idea. Has anyone delt with the 3 types of weather conditions?
Hi Tinkertea,

I think I have experienced most of the climates you have described. At one time or another I have lived in San Diego, Salt Lake City, Phoenix, and Mobile, AL. Salt Lake City would have a climate pretty comparable to Denver, Mobile had the humidity, and of course Phoenix with the heat. And then, San Diego could possible compare to where you are coming from.

My personal favorite of these places for climate was San Diego. But, of course, I can't afford to live there now and it's exactly why you are leaving. So, I understand.

For me, I would pick heat over snow and humidity any day. Humidity makes things sticky and a lot of times miserable. I hated the snow. It is such a production. On snowy days you have to wake up three hours earlier than normal so you have time to shovel off your driveway and scrape the ice off your car before you go anywhere. And then you have to drive in the stuff and nobody seems to move more than 20 miles an hour, and you can't see, and there are accidents all over the place and your once 20 minute commute takes over two hours. You had to dress up in coats, boots, scarves, and gloves just to go out. And then when you got somewhere you would have to take it all off just to put it all on again when you had to leave.

As far as the heat goes, 110 degrees in Phoenix is about equivalent to 90 degrees in the humidity, in my opinion.

Anyway, this is just my opinion. Everyone is different and has different preferences. I hope you figure out what is best for you.
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Old 06-15-2007, 06:03 PM
 
Location: Arizona, The American Southwest
51,816 posts, read 29,898,627 times
Reputation: 90880
Quote:
Originally Posted by sablebaby View Post
.....But for AZ heat, if you mean "a few months" as in 6 months, then you'd be right. We start getting 100 degree days in April-May and it ends in mid Oct.
SableBaby, I have to elaborate on that a little bit, we do start getting 100 degree days in April, but we don't get them everyday. This year, we only saw one day of 100 degrees in April, and the entire month of May, we stayed below 100, with even some highs in the 80s, up until just last week, we had a couple of days with highs in the 80's. On the average, 100+ degree highs don't become the daily weather forecast until late May/early June.
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Old 06-15-2007, 06:12 PM
 
Location: Work is based nationwide
570 posts, read 1,259,428 times
Reputation: 133
Tinkertea. It's a good thing you have the ability to make choices, so that's nice.. I have lived in the 3 climates your asking about. I'm a native of Pittsburgh and have returned back to the city after residency in south florida, colorado and new england. Pittsburgh will give you the change in seasons. Out of all the cities mentioned Pittsburgh will give you the most change. Denver does certainly have season change and may have some of the most crazy 24 hour weather changes of the cities mentioned. But Pittsburgh has a great supply of moisture in the form of the Great Lakes, Atlantic Ocean and from the south. We don't have droughts here for any prolonged time. We also have more clouds then the rest of the cities you mentioned. Our temps are really pretty moderate. Winter cold is mainly in the 30's at day and teens and 20's at night with some up's and down's in between. Once in a blue moon we may get a 6 inch plus snow storm. Denver seems to recieve more larger scale snowstorms then we have here. To me the humidity is a plus. I know when I lived in Colorado I always felt very dry. I also had a fair amount of bloody noses. The colorado blue sky was a great thing to see I must say. To me the heat and humidity of Atlanta is pretty nasty stuff but you do get use to it if your out in it a lot. Winters in Charlotte and Atlanta are mild with just a few short cold snaps and possible short period falling snows. I spent time in Tuscon and the summer sun and heat was just about enough for me to move at the time. Talk about dry and more dry.. If your a die hard for sunshine, Pittsburgh recieves the least amount out of your city selection. But we have all 4 distinct seasons and besides flash flooding we really don't have that much of a severe weather threat. So I guess after living around the country I would give the Pittsburgh climate a 'ok'.. Certainly I can do my outdoor's stuff most of the year and I can easily live with it.. Good luck in your city search!
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Old 06-15-2007, 06:21 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,006 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059
I saw this on the Denver forum, but didn't read any of the responses. I'll answer here, as I visit both forums regularly.

I personally don't mind the Pgh weather as much as my husband does; he is from Omaha. My bff's husband is from Albuquerque, he thinks the Pittsburgh weather is abysmal.

Denver weather:
Pro: LOW, LOW humidity, often in the single digits, especially when it gets hot.
Sunny most days of the year. You hear different numbers, but the number of clear days is about 250, the number of sunny days is about 300/yr.
In general, little snow. It tends to come in big dumps sometimes, but is usually gone in a few days. (This winter was an exception, the first real snowy winter since 1992-93.)
Not a lot of rain to interfere with outdoor activiites.

Con: Can get very hot in the summer. Usually a day or two above 100 degrees.
Can get below zero in the winter.
Dry. Some summers there are watering restrictions, making it difficult to keep up a lawn or to garden.
Tornadoes, lightning strikes, hailstorms.
Very wierd climate; can be 70 degrees on the New Year's Day and also on the 4th of July. On the other hand, can be zero on NYD and 100 on the 4th of July. Plus anything in between. Very changeable, even more so than Pittsburgh. Always (well almost always) snows on Halloween. Snow in Sept and snow in June (though the June snow doesn't usually stick) in any given year.

Pittsburgh:

Pros: Gorgeous falls with fairly nice weather. Sometimes warm well into fall.
Not terribly hot in the summer in general.
Not usually too cold in the winter.
Not a terribly high amount of snow.
4 distinct seasons.
Cons: Humidity, humidity, humidity. The hotter it gets, the more humid it gets.
Cloudy and dreary much of the winter, and a lot of the spring and fall as well.
Lots of rain. Good for gardens and lawns, bad for outdoor activities.

You decide.
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Old 06-15-2007, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Tega Cay, SC
390 posts, read 1,368,505 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NCMOMOFTWO View Post
coming from Ny and Nj the humidity doesnt bother me either..actually Its not as bad as back home
We haven't had much humidity, though, since you got here. Just wait until August!
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Old 06-15-2007, 06:34 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,006 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059
See my detailed compairson of Denver and Pittsburgh weather on the Pittsburgh forum. I don't mind snow, but some Califonians never seem to adapt to it. You won't know until you try it, if it's for you.
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Old 06-15-2007, 06:46 PM
 
11,715 posts, read 35,962,694 times
Reputation: 7512
Do people slow down when driving in the snow and ice or is it like SoCal where they like to pretend that wet roads don't mean anything and thus cause lots and lots of accidents? Are there days where its just too hazardous to be out driving and everyone who can takes a sick day or are you expected to show up at 8am come hell, high water, ice, or 10' snow drifts?
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Old 06-15-2007, 06:54 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,006 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by EscapeCalifornia;893603 [QUOTE
Do people slow down when driving in the snow and ice or is it like SoCal where they like to pretend that wet roads don't mean anything and thus cause lots and lots of accidents?
Yes and No. In other words, some do, some don't.

Quote:
Are there days where its just too hazardous to be out driving and everyone who can takes a sick day or are you expected to show up at 8am come hell, high water, ice, or 10' snow drifts?
A) Not too many days like that. For the most part, you are expected to show up. It depends somewhat on the type of work you do. In healthcare, you'd better show up.
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Old 06-15-2007, 07:15 PM
 
1,088 posts, read 5,826,943 times
Reputation: 470
Quote:
Originally Posted by EscapeCalifornia View Post
Are there days where its just too hazardous to be out driving and everyone who can takes a sick day or are you expected to show up at 8am come hell, high water, ice, or 10' snow drifts?
It always depends on your employer. Where my dad works they have a strict tardiness policy and some people abuse it, so when a snow storm comes around a lot of people get into trouble. Where my mom works they couldn't really care less. When it gets really bad most places will close down but like pittnurse said, certain industries are still expected to show up. Four years ago the Denver area got about 4 feet of snow (not a typical Colorado snow storm) and everything shut down. My aunt works for CU med center and was of course expected to show up. To help get essential personnel into work the hospital participated in a program where volunteers with high profile vehicles went out and picked up the hospital staff and brought them to and from work.

I think it is impossible to tell somebody if snow or heat are better. Personally I would take the snow. Many take the heat. Humidity is another story. I live in Atlanta right now and can tell you those really hot miserable days you experience in CA once in a while are nothing compared to the humidity of Atlanta. It doesn't take much heat to be miserable when you add in the humidity.
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Old 06-15-2007, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,608 posts, read 20,718,689 times
Reputation: 5347
Tinkertea, also see my other response to your question in the Phoenix forum. I would look at the total package of what the city you are moving to has to offer-- including the kind of vegetation and scenery, the kinds of recreational activities available, places you can go for a day-trip on the weekend within an hour's drive-- and not just "the weather." I'm not sure what your age and interests are, but if you're into hiking, biking, fishing, climbing, rafting-- basically, anything that ends in "-ing," Colorado is a paradise. There are few environments comparable to the Rocky Mountains, which you can high up into just an hour west of Denver. Even within the metro area itself, there are a ton of places to spend time outdoors and get in shape-- like Cherry Creek State Park. Denver blows away Phoenix, and quiet possibly most of LA, too, in this regard.

You should also read my response to another question on city-data, Is it totally self-indulgent to move for climate/leisure? Denver may or may not be for you; you'd have to visit (both in the summer and winter), talk to some locals, and look around to find that out. But when it comes to snow and cold, sometimes you just have to toughen up a little (and wear a jacket ). Living in a place that gets snow is normal, and is more in line with mainstream American culture, especially once the holiday season comes around, than this southern california/arizona stuff.
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