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Old 04-29-2008, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Marquette,MI
6 posts, read 11,272 times
Reputation: 10

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My husband and I live in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan -- very north. We desperately need to move south to get away from these winters, and to get closer to our granddaughter. My husband is a little nervous about moving south as he is Jewish and is worried about attitudes towards Jews that he might encounter. Anyone have any experience with this? Maybe you can suggest a diverse area that would be more comfortable for him.
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Old 04-30-2008, 07:17 AM
 
8,862 posts, read 14,836,504 times
Reputation: 2280
I don't think religious preference would be an issue in metro Atlanta.

Link to CD threads >>>
looking for young jewish population


There is an Orthodox community near Emory University and several other active communities in Dunwoody and Sandy Springs.

There would be fewer synagogues in more rural areas of the state.
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Old 04-30-2008, 11:10 PM
 
1,755 posts, read 5,020,459 times
Reputation: 551
Plenty of Jews in East Cobb and Alpharetta.

On a side note, please define your definition of 'diverse' for future posters. Looking for a n-hood that respects jews doesn't mean diverse. You just want a jew-safe n-hood, not diverse.

If you really want diversity then state you want Jew/Catholic/Protestant/Black/White/Latino/Asian community.

People tend to think Jews and Christians or Blacks and Whites dictate diverse, even though at that point we're only talking two groups, correct?
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Old 04-30-2008, 11:17 PM
 
Location: Road Warrior
2,015 posts, read 5,005,214 times
Reputation: 798
Jewish people settled in Charleston, SC even before the founding of our nation. Today many New Yorkers some Jewish chose to relocate to the South all along the Eastern seaboard for the same reasons, warm weather, warm people.
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Old 05-01-2008, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Marquette,MI
6 posts, read 11,272 times
Reputation: 10
In response to gt6974a: I appreciate your response. I apologize for the vagueness I created by using the term "diversity". I realize that diversity no doubt means different things to different people (more than just religion and ethnicity), in fact I was counting on that and hoping that I would get a variety of responses. Other than my husband's religion, we represent a broad spectrum of "diversity" ourselves but rather than be specific about ourselves and our lives I figured I'd just see what kind of responses I got.
So, diverse and varied responses welcomed!!!
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Old 05-01-2008, 09:54 PM
 
177 posts, read 898,302 times
Reputation: 88
upnorth cheri,

I have heard many times that Atlanta has either the first or second fastest growing Jewish population in the US. Sorry I can't be clearer on this. A couple of years ago when I was trying to talk Jewish friends from our former home town to move to Georgia I had that particular stat much clearer (to use as a "selling" point). Now it's sort of a vague memory. Let me just say that it's my understanding that a LOT of Jewish people are locating to Georgia, particularly Atlanta.

We live in a rural area and many of the Jewish folks who used to lived here have relocated to Atlanta as they've grown older because their children and grandchildren live in Atlanta. Though there are some younger Jewish folks who have moved into our area (south of Atlanta) in the last few years.

There must be a sizeable number of Jewish folks in Macon because a couple of years ago someone was starting up a kosher chicken processing plant for local consumption. I don't know if it was successful or not. If you think about Macon at all, let me suggest the NORTH side.

There is a website for Jews in the South, which I used to look at from time to time, but sorry, I can't remember the name. It should be fairly easy to find, though.

Also, you could post a thread asking about Jews in Atlanta or Georgia in general --whatever your interest is on that subject (synagogues, temples, communities, shops, etc.) and I think you'd get a lot of responses from this list.

All the best,
zebbie
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Old 05-01-2008, 11:03 PM
 
1,755 posts, read 5,020,459 times
Reputation: 551
Quote:
Originally Posted by upnorthcheri View Post
In response to gt6974a: I appreciate your response. I apologize for the vagueness I created by using the term "diversity". I realize that diversity no doubt means different things to different people (more than just religion and ethnicity), in fact I was counting on that and hoping that I would get a variety of responses. Other than my husband's religion, we represent a broad spectrum of "diversity" ourselves but rather than be specific about ourselves and our lives I figured I'd just see what kind of responses I got.
So, diverse and varied responses welcomed!!!
nah, your okay, In a way, I was pointing out the fact that White Christians get hammered all the time on these forums. Well, maybe just White. You'll see the word 'Diverse', or 'Black' or 'Jewish', etc. But if you say 'White' community, your damned to Hell.
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Old 05-02-2008, 02:17 PM
 
9 posts, read 29,159 times
Reputation: 15
You're more likely to face adversity due to being white than being Jewish. (Atlanta is a black town.) Religion isn't really an issue.
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Old 05-03-2008, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Near Devil's Pond, Georgia
424 posts, read 1,510,445 times
Reputation: 627
As others have stated, "diversity" is somewhat of a loaded term. It ranks right along with "urban" as far as being a code word that has strayed from the standard definition and taken a special connotation of its own. That said, I don't think you will have any problems related to religion at all. Atlanta has had a vibrant, somewhat eclectic Jewish population for years. So have Savannah, Charleston, New Orleans, and many areas of the Mississippi Delta, and other parts of The South. And then there is Miami! It is kind of funny in a way when some local Jewish folks have visitors from the Northeast or Great Lakes; they might be mortified to see what some of the the locals eat. Over the years Jews and others who have made this area home have assimilated and taken quite well to local custom while still maintaing family and religious tradition; it has just been customized for this area. But one would expect that. As far as established families in the area, some of the dearest and and most entrenched/traditional Southern women you will find in the area have Jewish roots. Although things might be a little different here, I don't think you will have a problem maintaining your Jewish faith, customs, and practices, or in eventually feeling at home and comfortable with the new people you meet here.

My family is quite the mix. As far as religion goes, we've got the typical Protestant religions represented: United Methoidst, Presbyterian Church USA, Southern Baptist, Episcopol,and Lutheran Churches among others. We also have have Sephardic and Ashkenazi Jews, Armenian Orthodox, Greek Orthodox, Eastern Rite Catholic, and Syrian Orthodox family members. For the moment we don't have any Roman Catholics or Muslims in the family, but we have in the past and that could change again. It is really great when we all get together for our family events. The emphasis is we are FAMILY first; the ethnic and religious differences are secondary. This time of year I typically have at least 3 major family events...the 2 (Usually) Easter celebrations and the Passover Seder. Although the dietary needs and traditions are a bit different among the various parts of the family, we find that food and its preparation can bring us together.
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