U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 05-31-2009, 07:16 PM
 
51 posts, read 194,076 times
Reputation: 49

Advertisements

Let me just preface my post by saying I don't know anything about construction, so if my terms aren't quite right, you'll have to excuse me.

With that said, I'm under contract for a new construction home near Augusta, GA. After talking with my realtor, I was informed that the wall framing in the house would be 24'' on center. I've heard of roof trusses and some interior walls being 24'' on center, but I thought that all external, load bearing walls had to be 16'' on center.

Anyone know about Georgia construction code? Is 24'' on center a big deal?

The house will be located in Columbia county, and will be one story if that helps.

Thanks in advance.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-01-2009, 12:53 PM
 
9,124 posts, read 32,817,806 times
Reputation: 3541
The code allows 24" o.c. framing, so it shouldn't be an issue. For a single-story house, the loads from the roof are fairly minimal, and the fact that there's less wood in the wall actually allows for a higher percentage of the wall to be insulation, which raises the effective R-value of the wall assembly.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-01-2009, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Mableton, GA USA (NW Atlanta suburb, 4 miles OTP)
11,319 posts, read 22,509,353 times
Reputation: 3886
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobKovacs View Post
The code allows 24" o.c. framing, so it shouldn't be an issue. For a single-story house, the loads from the roof are fairly minimal, and the fact that there's less wood in the wall actually allows for a higher percentage of the wall to be insulation, which raises the effective R-value of the wall assembly.
I suspect the lack of snow accumulation in GA makes for much less stringent codes when it comes to roofs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-01-2009, 03:38 PM
 
51 posts, read 194,076 times
Reputation: 49
Thanks guys for the replies.

I called up the Georgia Department of Community Affairs, and talked to one of their construction code "reps". I asked him about the issue, and he said it was well within code to build a house with 24'' centers. Like you guys, he also said that the house would be more energy efficient by replacing some of the wood studs with insulation. He said 15-20% more energy efficient, but that seems optimistic.

Do you guys see any potential problems with a 24'' OC house?

I have a meeting with the builder tomorrow...Is there anything I should ask?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-01-2009, 04:44 PM
 
9,124 posts, read 32,817,806 times
Reputation: 3541
Well, if the typical wall is 15% wood and 85% insulation, theoretically, the 24" vs 16" spacing would change that to 10%/90%/ In reality, it'll probably be more like a 3-4% change, since you'll still have dobled studs at windows, etc. I'd have to calc the difference based in the differing R values of the wood and the insulation, but I'd say you're probably looking at more like a 5-7% energy savings.

I don't see any problems with the 24" centers- I'm actually planning on doing 24" centers on my next house.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-05-2009, 08:04 PM
 
1,474 posts, read 3,089,708 times
Reputation: 2054
i'm not in construction so there's my full disclosure.

but why 24" and not 16? who is benefiting here? clearly the 16" will be more sturdy unless i'm missing something. it sounds to me there is cost cutting which might be fine as long as YOU are the one who saves a buck. i'd be asking around more on this.

and u are already under a contract? you might want to put on your game face here and avoid being ramrodded. what next? outhouse?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-06-2009, 05:11 AM
 
9,124 posts, read 32,817,806 times
Reputation: 3541
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ollie1946 View Post
i'm not in construction so there's my full disclosure.

but why 24" and not 16? who is benefiting here? clearly the 16" will be more sturdy unless i'm missing something. it sounds to me there is cost cutting which might be fine as long as YOU are the one who saves a buck. i'd be asking around more on this.

and u are already under a contract? you might want to put on your game face here and avoid being ramrodded. what next? outhouse?
Sure- and 12" would be even sturdier- maybe go to 8" o.c. "just to be sure". It's a matter of what's actually necessary- you can keep adding wood to the house to make it "more sturdy", but you're diminishing the insulation at the same time. A 24" o.c. frame is more than adequate to withstand the loads it's required to withstand- 16" centers was arrived at many years ago with little engineering theory, and just stuck- it's a convenient measurement, since 8' sheets of plywood, drywall, etc., divide evenly into 16" spaces.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-06-2009, 06:41 AM
 
1,474 posts, read 3,089,708 times
Reputation: 2054
seems to me when you are looking for that stud on the inside to hang a tv, heavy shelving or some other item where you have to have a stud, then 16" makes things more flexible than 24". and again, who is saving money here? the buyer or the builder. hmmmm....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-06-2009, 07:27 AM
 
9,124 posts, read 32,817,806 times
Reputation: 3541
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ollie1946 View Post
seems to me when you are looking for that stud on the inside to hang a tv, heavy shelving or some other item where you have to have a stud, then 16" makes things more flexible than 24". and again, who is saving money here? the buyer or the builder. hmmmm....
So lets load up the walls with unnecessary wood just to make it easier to hang your 62" TV......lol.

They're both saving money- the builder is saving $$ on material, and the buyer will be saving on heating/cooling costs due to a more efficient envelope.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top