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Old 06-22-2011, 09:25 PM
 
Location: University City, Philadelphia
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I was wondering about this today and I want to hear different points of views.

In your opinion: what is best environment to live in, the country (a more rural setting, but including small towns and villages), the city, or the suburbs?

Let's not wallow in stereotypes. "Country living" does not necessary mean living on a farm and raising cows. There are quaint and historic small towns in rural counties that draw tourists from near and afar. Likewise, you can live in a very big city and still live in a single family house and have a backyard. Example, plenty of folks in New York's Brooklyn or Queens live in a private house yet are just a few blocks away from Nostrand Avenue or Queens Blvd. Suburbs are not only miles of residential sprawl, but can be like Broward County's Hollywood, Florida, which has a vibrant little downtown area with many restaurants, cafes, nightlife, galleries etc.

What are your views?
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Old 06-23-2011, 10:40 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
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It depends on what you want, what your goals are, etc.
I have lived in big cities. I enjoyed calling up and ordering pizza at 10 PM or later, enjoyed the nightlife, the 24-hour bustle, the intent and puposeful living style.
I worked in politics for 20 years, traveled the country, was in DC, Seattle, San Antonio, St Louis, Las Vegas, Houston, SLC - you name it. I enjoyed it thouroughly, meeting new people, always different but always the same.

Now I live on a farm on the edge of a tiny town, raise those cows and chickens, have a huge garden, and I work harder now than I ever did. Those who think country living is soporific - just own houses! LOL I have a much better quality of life - pure food, clean water, clean air, early evenings on the verandah of my 100-year-old farmhouse with the stained-glass windows and the 3 inch maple wainscoting throughout... watching the stars come out and listening to the coyotes howl. There's a lot to be said for contentment.

My 25 year old daughter and 32 year old son live and work in Las Vegas, and they love the 'bright lights big city' - but they are counting on coming here eventually when the excitement wears off. Nothing wrong with any of it - as long as you know what you want and are happy in your choices.
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Old 06-23-2011, 11:02 PM
 
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Grew up near NYC and hated the pace of living; my husband in Buffalo and was never impressed. First apt. was in a small multi-family in cookie cutter burbs and it was tight and everyone knew your business. Moved to the farthest defined possible end of the burbs backed up to a farm and hayfield about 40 years ago... we even retired right here. And... the farm is still in the back yard. Quiet, peaceful, good neighbors ( most from families here many years/generations)... beats insanity and costs and "keeping up with".
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Old 06-24-2011, 12:17 AM
 
Location: Lethbridge, AB
1,132 posts, read 1,605,272 times
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I grew up on a ranch, but now live in a small to moderate sized city. There's certainly benefits and drawbacks to each, but personally, I find the city grates on me. If I stay in the city too long, I start to feel hemmed in.

Any of those environments will fit a particular type of person, though.
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Old 06-24-2011, 08:35 AM
 
Location: University City, Philadelphia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SCGranny View Post

Now I live on a farm on the edge of a tiny town, raise those cows and chickens, have a huge garden, and I work harder now than I ever did. Those who think country living is soporific - just own houses! LOL I have a much better quality of life - pure food, clean water, clean air, early evenings on the verandah of my 100-year-old farmhouse with the stained-glass windows and the 3 inch maple wainscoting throughout... watching the stars come out and listening to the coyotes howl. There's a lot to be said for contentment.
Although I live near the heart of a big city, I live in a 120 year old Victorian single family house with a large porch, leaded stained glass windows, Tiger Oak wainscoting, high ceilings, pocket doors and three ornate fireplaces.
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Old 06-27-2011, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque
244 posts, read 245,610 times
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I grew up in a small city (more the mentality than the geography) and I spent most of my adult life in the big city - smack in the middle. There are benefits to both. However, I will say that living in the heart of San Francisco was heaven on earth. Even with so many tourists crawling all over our Nob Hill neighborhood it was fun to see them packed like tuna on the cable car with cameras glued to their bodies and smiles from ear to ear while I walked the two blocks (100 yards) to my morning espresso. We even had an electric, 24-hour city bus route right outside our apartment that we actually missed hearing (zzzeeeer-thulack-shulack bom-bom - I can still hear it now) on vacations to other parts of the country.

I lived there for ten years and went from initially saying five days a week, "I can't believe I live here," to saying it two to three times a week in the last months.

Now I have a house with manicured lawns and shrubs (that I preen starting at 4 am every single morning). I kind of miss being able to call the landlord if something broke. As a homeowner it makes more sense to fix things yourself if you can.

There is definitely a lot to be said about hearing only birds in the morning as you drink coffee and relax. If my ultimate dream comes true I will live in a small city not far from a big one, perhaps Mendocino so I can drive into the city and spend the night whenever I want to. I'd love to own a small B&B, have a hen house and small garden, cook breakfast and dinner for my guests four days a week, and read and write privately the other three.

Damn, life can be good!
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Old 06-27-2011, 04:16 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn
40,057 posts, read 29,774,281 times
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I was born in New York City, but taken to live in the suburbs by my parents when I was early into my teens. Hated it from Day One, and always promised myself I'd come back to the city...which I did (to my parents' horror; they thought they were doing something good by fleeing to suburbia).

If this is a poll, not only do I vote for the city, but I sneak back to vote again and again under assumed names. Maybe even pay a few people to cast votes for the city, as well.
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Old 06-27-2011, 11:46 PM
 
Location: Austin, Texas
2,756 posts, read 5,269,428 times
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Choosing the best place to live cannot be stated in a flat, definitive, surefire manner, since, as is usually the cas with questions concerning lifestyle choices, the answer depends upon on what the individual is looking for.
If you like hustle and bustle and easy access to shopping and amenities and culture and art and enjoy being around people, then living in the city is probably a good idea.
On the other hand, if you prefer tranquility and being immersed in nature, or maybe just want to have a big yard and a garden and maybe a few animals, then country living will most likely suit you best.
If you maybe are raising a family and want access to good schools and perhaps a compromise between country and city living, then I'd reckon that suburbia might be the place for you and yours.
Que no, amigo?
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Old 06-28-2011, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn
40,057 posts, read 29,774,281 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrummerBoy View Post
Choosing the best place to live cannot be stated in a flat, definitive, surefire manner, since, as is usually the cas with questions concerning lifestyle choices, the answer depends upon on what the individual is looking for.
Nobody said the topic wasn't completely subjective. The OP wanted a variety of viewpoints, which is something that can be counted on.
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Old 06-28-2011, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
1,954 posts, read 4,383,627 times
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Either the city or the country. The city offers culture, vibrancy, and convenience. The country offers personal freedom and quiet. The suburbs don't offer either.

Unfortunately we have become a suburban nation because we have let our cities fall into poor condition while the government has enforced policies which encourage suburban sprawl. Rural living has also become tough in modern America because there are very few good jobs away from the larger urbanized centers.
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