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Old 08-01-2011, 12:32 AM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
13,856 posts, read 22,236,543 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Canadians use both, which is extremely confusing. Especially for date days below 12. Is 01/07 July 1st or January 7th? I used to work in a bank in Ontario and it was very confusing because roughly half the cheques we got were MDY and half were DMY.
Interesting. And I certainly see how that's confusing for dates below the twelfth. The first time I saw "14/01/99", or whatever it was, on something from Europe it briefly confused me as I'd never seen DMY system but I figured it out quick enough. If it had been 10/01/99 I might have been thinking it was October rather than January. And if you're in a place that uses both, eek
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Old 08-01-2011, 10:20 AM
 
771 posts, read 827,981 times
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America would gain in that scenario, just 30 mil population bump but massive land and resources
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Old 08-01-2011, 01:47 PM
 
285 posts, read 538,307 times
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Canada would lose its sense of unified identity with regions of Canada becoming more like the American regions that are close rather than like other parts of Canada. For example, Vancouver would be another Pacific NW city, Winnipeg would be another Upper Midwest City, Ontario would be more like Michigan and Upstate New York, New Brunswick would be another East Coast state, etc...
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Old 08-01-2011, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,198,151 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by czb2004 View Post
Canada would lose its sense of unified identity with regions of Canada becoming more like the American regions that are close rather than like other parts of Canada. For example, Vancouver would be another Pacific NW city, Winnipeg would be another Upper Midwest City, Ontario would be more like Michigan and Upstate New York, New Brunswick would be another East Coast state, etc...
Canada is already like that. Vancouver has little in common with Quebec or Newfoundland, for example, but a lot in common with Pacific Northwest cities like Portland and Seattle. Winnipeg fits right in with the Upper Midwest, and southern Ontario is very much like Michigan.
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Old 08-01-2011, 07:00 PM
 
Location: Chicago
38,691 posts, read 86,811,612 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by czb2004 View Post
Canada would lose its sense of unified identity . . .
Ask Albertans if they feel a sense of "unified identity" with eastern Canada. Or vice-versa. Ask the Maritimers if they give a hoot about Vancouver. Ask the aboriginals of Nunvaut the same thing. Oh, and don't forget that roughly half of Quebecers would just as soon their province be a separate country altogether. "Sense of unified identity" indeed.
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Old 08-01-2011, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
5,841 posts, read 6,919,012 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by czb2004 View Post
Canada would lose its sense of unified identity with regions of Canada becoming more like the American regions that are close rather than like other parts of Canada. For example, Vancouver would be another Pacific NW city, Winnipeg would be another Upper Midwest City, Ontario would be more like Michigan and Upstate New York, New Brunswick would be another East Coast state, etc...

Having lived in Michigan all my life I can say that the western half of Ontario is alot like michigan. For a while I lived so close to the border that I could see Canada from my front door, and going to Canada was a frequent thing. Ontario is in no way "foriegn", in fact the signs in French are really the only way you can tell that your in Canada, but you could easily mistake Ontario for Mi or Wi. Im sure that Eastern Ontario does resemble upstate New York as well. That makes sense to me, although I have not been over that way enough to know for sure.
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Old 08-01-2011, 11:58 PM
 
285 posts, read 538,307 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
Ask Albertans if they feel a sense of "unified identity" with eastern Canada. Or vice-versa. Ask the Maritimers if they give a hoot about Vancouver. Ask the aboriginals of Nunvaut the same thing. Oh, and don't forget that roughly half of Quebecers would just as soon their province be a separate country altogether. "Sense of unified identity" indeed.
I think that in general there is some sense of unity in that they have the same government, laws, foreign policy, history, etc...(Quebec is an exception) There may be some differences, but they are all Canadian and I am just saying that that would be lost if Canada joined the US. THAT would be the difference (referring to original question); regions of America would add a major city or two and Canadian identity would be lost.
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Old 08-02-2011, 06:08 AM
 
Location: Chicago
38,691 posts, read 86,811,612 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by czb2004 View Post
I think that in general there is some sense of unity in that they have the same government, laws, foreign policy, history, etc...(Quebec is an exception) There may be some differences, but they are all Canadian and I am just saying that that would be lost if Canada joined the US. THAT would be the difference (referring to original question); regions of America would add a major city or two and Canadian identity would be lost.
I think you underestimate the divide between eastern and western Canada. Alberta in particular is basically Canada's equivalent to Texas -- the "independent" streak is so strong that many of them consider themselves Albertans first, Canadians second, and wouldn't lose a lot of sleep if Alberta seceded from Canada. And "Quebec is the exception" can't simply be dismissed as a parenthetical insert when speaking about a sense of unified identity. That's a might big exception.
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Old 08-02-2011, 06:10 AM
 
16,438 posts, read 18,516,574 times
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Why would you want to mess up Canada like that?
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Old 08-02-2011, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Phoenix
2,176 posts, read 862,940 times
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Canada and US becoming one would definitely benefit Canada but I doubt they would want to. I would much rather become one with them though than Mexico.
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