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Old 02-26-2012, 04:53 PM
 
Location: USA
2,758 posts, read 6,433,769 times
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The USA is not bland and boring. Not by any stretch of the imagination. There's something for everybody here. Oh maybe we don't have the historical aspect of Europe, but we have the places and the scenery. I have never been to a place that didn't stick in my mind in the USA.
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Old 02-26-2012, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Earth
2,549 posts, read 3,112,295 times
Reputation: 1198
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
Well, I have traveled to 24 out of 50 States, road trip style. Almost entirely east of the Mississippi river. Also been to Texas and arizona.
I have actually been to 47 states and I don't think it's anywhere near boring but yet I myself grew up in Asia and have been to Europe. The only single country that comes closest to our diversity over all would be China. However, we have a more diverse world ethnic population then they do.
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Old 02-26-2012, 09:09 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
9,289 posts, read 8,403,769 times
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I'm a world traveler and the *natural* scenery in the US is unmatched the world over. However, the history in Europe, Asia, and Africa is much longer and so there is far more variety of architectural styles. Something in the US from the 18th century is very old. Something from the 18th century in Europe is not considered that old, 10th century maybe so. So in that sense, you can see a lot more architectural styles and can see ways of life far different than the US.

That being said, I truly believe this is the best country in the world and I wouldn't live anywhere else. But yes I do understand that parts of the US can be quite cookie cutter.

I advise the OP to travel the world!
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Old 02-27-2012, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
5,793 posts, read 10,623,072 times
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Cracks me up when people complain about cookie cutter, yet have never been to europe. Post War Housing in Europe is the template of cookie cutter.

While the US may not have the grandeur of the Greco/Roman/Moorish culture and its aftermath, we still have a significant Pre-european / post european history
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Old 02-27-2012, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
771 posts, read 1,048,066 times
Reputation: 438
Quote:
Originally Posted by DinsdalePirahna View Post
Cracks me up when people complain about cookie cutter, yet have never been to europe. Post War Housing in Europe is the template of cookie cutter.

While the US may not have the grandeur of the Greco/Roman/Moorish culture and its aftermath, we still have a significant Pre-european / post european history
Exactly. I think many can agree that European cities in terms of beauty and architecture are in their own leauge that very little cities can recreate. With a few exceptions, most of the rest of the world does not have that caliber of cities that are in Europe.

However, this doesn't mean that American cities are bland an boring. Sure Chicago does not look like Paris, but Chicago is beautiful in its own way. When it comes to architecture and history Europe is more interesting, but again that does not mean the U.S. is not interesting or boring.
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Old 02-27-2012, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Viña del Mar, Chile
16,416 posts, read 25,194,987 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
Then howcome it seems like foreigners rarely visit the U.S. for vacation or tourism? I hear more about Americans traveling to other countries than non-Americans coming to America for leisure and travel.

You live in Connecticut...

Tourists come from all over the world ALL the time to see United States. This comment is so ignorant it makes me laugh.
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Old 02-27-2012, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
771 posts, read 1,048,066 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burgler09 View Post
You live in Connecticut...

Tourists come from all over the world ALL the time to see United States. This comment is so ignorant it makes me laugh.
And lacks common sense. Possibly the reason this individual hears more of Americans traveling abroad and not foreigners coming here could be to the simple fact that if you live in the U.S. you are surrounded by Americans and not foreigners?
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Old 02-29-2012, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
9,289 posts, read 8,403,769 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DinsdalePirahna View Post
Cracks me up when people complain about cookie cutter, yet have never been to europe. Post War Housing in Europe is the template of cookie cutter.

While the US may not have the grandeur of the Greco/Roman/Moorish culture and its aftermath, we still have a significant Pre-european / post european history
Discounting Mexico and South America (since we are focusing on the US), the only "pre" European relics are burial mounds in the south and the carved cliffs in the southwest. I wouldn't call that significant. Now if you include the Americas in general, well the Mayan temples and the Aztec sites are just as historical as anything in Europe. But unfortunately, the natives in America tended to build wood structures that decayed years ago, except for the tribes in the southwest where some of their housing is still evident today.

The US natural scenery cannot be matched, however.
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Old 02-29-2012, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Blankity-blank!
11,449 posts, read 13,911,504 times
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There isn't a country in the world that created its natural scenery. So why debate that fact?
American achitecture isn't very creative, but impressive for size and height.
American commercial structures are built for efficiency and as low cost as possible. That means quick foundations, steel support beams, corrugated metal siding and roofs, cheap looking, unimaginative fasades with neon signs.
The residential structures are boring (except for the 10 million dollar mansions of the super rich).
The older cities (New York, Chicago, San Francisco, etc.) have character, the newer cities (Houston, Phoenix, etc.) are built for cars and spread out over a large area of boring structures.
Many of America's older cities are allowed to decay and no one cares.
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Old 02-29-2012, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Lafayette, Louisiana
698 posts, read 506,182 times
Reputation: 786
Quote:
Originally Posted by Visvaldis View Post
There isn't a country in the world that created its natural scenery. So why debate that fact?
American achitecture isn't very creative, but impressive for size and height.
American commercial structures are built for efficiency and as low cost as possible. That means quick foundations, steel support beams, corrugated metal siding and roofs, cheap looking, unimaginative fasades with neon signs.
The residential structures are boring (except for the 10 million dollar mansions of the super rich).
The older cities (New York, Chicago, San Francisco, etc.) have character, the newer cities (Houston, Phoenix, etc.) are built for cars and spread out over a large area of boring structures.
Many of America's older cities are allowed to decay and no one cares.
1. It's not an issue of creating natural scenery but about possessing it. The United States has a very enjoyable natural environment that has been well preserved.

2. The Federal-style is quite creative (Most of our state houses are designed in this style as well as the U.S. capitol). I'll only get into four styles because they only allow a few pictures per post but you can add Richardsonian, Bay Area regional, Cape Cod, International, Shingle, Four-Square, Monterey Colonial, Territorial, etc...
http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2639/3977844155_94d7315524_z.jpg?zz=1
Untitled (http://www.flickr.com/photos/24625828@N07/3977844155/ - broken link) by gvalenzuelarg (http://www.flickr.com/people/24625828@N07/ - broken link), on Flickr

There's American Queen Anne...
http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6034/6289050636_06e0d0845b_z.jpg
Victorian House #1 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/mud_cre...to/6289050636/ - broken link) by Mud Creek Photo (http://www.flickr.com/people/mud_creek_photo/ - broken link), on Flickr

Prairie school
http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4153/4999617693_d1d1aa6268_z.jpg
Russell Barr Williamson House (1921) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/chicagogeek/4999617693/ - broken link) by ChicagoGeek (http://www.flickr.com/people/chicagogeek/ - broken link), on Flickr

Craftsman
http://farm2.staticflickr.com/1146/986443953_2ea38d7497_z.jpg
Craftsman circa 1920 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/jtuason/986443953/ - broken link) by jtuason (http://www.flickr.com/people/jtuason/ - broken link), on Flickr

3. Most of those pre-fabricated metal structures are relegated to industrial parks. I would define this as being more the norm for modern commercial architecture;
http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4133/4976274973_ef94ce7ab1.jpg
Dulles Town Crossing, Virginia, USA - Front View (http://www.flickr.com/photos/designamb/4976274973/ - broken link) by designamb (http://www.flickr.com/people/designamb/ - broken link), on Flickr
or...
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7044/6915408569_88ea919dd6.jpg
Eldon Building (Night) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/cci_gallery/6915408569/ - broken link) by CCi Gallery (http://www.flickr.com/people/cci_gallery/ - broken link), on Flickr

4. I absolutely, completely, unequivocally, explicitly disagree that American residential structures are "boring", especially pre-1990s.

5. Pheonix...True. Houston...Not so much. Seattle is a "new city". Portland is a "new city". Both are densely built cities with character.

6. Somewhat agree. Detroit being the poster child.

Last edited by JMT; 05-31-2013 at 06:32 AM..
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