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Old 02-29-2012, 03:06 PM
 
9,972 posts, read 14,017,847 times
Reputation: 9193

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Quote:
Originally Posted by 5trillion View Post
5. Pheonix...True. Houston...Not so much. Seattle is a "new city". Portland is a "new city". Both are densely built cities with character.
I see what you are getting at, but I don't know if I'd really call Portland or Seattle, "new cities" considering they were founded in the 1850s and both have dense central areas and architecture that tend to be dominated from buildings about 1890-1920 when both cities had their first major growth spurts. In comparison, much of the Sun Belt outside California(Texas, Arizona, Florida) didn't really boom until well into the Post War Era. Both had well over 200,000 people by 1910 and were among the 25 biggest cities in the country during that period.

The post-World War II inner and outer suburbs in both cities tend to be just as bland as anywhere else. The popular and dense inner areas are mostly a mix of early 1900s buildings with newer modern redevelopment. But it was the dense, older character of the inner neighborhoods, that allowed urban renewal projects encouraging density to really succeed in those cities. Where they've tried to manufacture denser neighborhoods in the suburbs the results have been mixed.
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Old 02-29-2012, 04:13 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,087 posts, read 9,602,612 times
Reputation: 5261
I think folks have been a little harsh on the OP. Does anyone on here read travel blogs like this site: Browse our Travel Blogs - the web's largest collection

I think if people did, they wouldn't criticize the OP so much. What you find when you read these world travel blogs from ordinary folks going from country to country is an amazing insight into our country. TBH, it seems that Americans travel the least out of all developed nations. You find Australians, Canadians, Germans, Brits, etc, etc. circling the globe and telling their stories. Of course that has to do with the fact that their governments by law make employers give multiple weeks off each year, while that is evil "socialism" which we will have none of. You get your two weeks and that's it.

Unfortunately, many times(not every case of course) I find myself shaking my head as they describe some of the most bland, unimaginative cities in the US. It seems particularly when people leave Canada or Australia and end up in the US that they are most critical. Cities like Phoenix, LA, Dallas, Houston, Atlanta, etc, etc. they just find quite bland compared to say Sydney or Vancouver, Toronto, Melbourne, Buenos Airies, Hong Kong, Singapore, Tokyo, Brisbane, etc.

They find sprawl particularly depressing. Yet many want to live miles from the city centre and drive to work. It makes for unattractive landscapes outside the city with strip malls and box retailers with giant parking lots everywhere. How can anyone find that appealing.

The travelers come here for the natural scenery and love it. They also love the areas outside the suburbs, the rural farmland areas. We have just about every imaginable landscape and climate. I love that. But I also happen to like walkable, interesting, lively cities with decent community planning and local input.

And those travelers also come for what they think will be amazing cities. And yet, besides New York and San Francisco, a tiny bit of New Orleans, the beach in Miami, the monuments in DC, the history trail in Boston, and a few other interesting older cities, they have not much good to say about our cities. They find the state of our public transport appaling in many locations. US public transport, in general, is not as good as the rest of the developed world. No one here wants to pay for it, or they consider it too much govt. I guess. It is obvious to them we don't prioritize funding for it. And they seem to have particular disdain for gated communities.

yes we have great natural beauty, but many of our cities and adjacent surburbs leave a lot to be desired. Not all by any means, but quite a few.

Why can't we have more proactive community planning that doesn't allow sprawl?

On a related note, why can't our govt even plan immigration such that we can slow down population growth? I don't want to see a USA with 400M plus people. Can you imagine the ugly sprawl then. We are growing at leaps and bounds compared to every first world nation. Ugh!
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Old 02-29-2012, 06:03 PM
 
4,774 posts, read 7,493,323 times
Reputation: 3959
The biggest problem in the US are its suburbs, extremely repetitive and practically devoid of anything meaningful to make you know that you're in a particular place (other than the signs welcoming you to such and such town, while it looks exactly the same as the towns before it and after it). Luckily, I live in a part of the US where, despite being suburban, the area has plenty of character to differentiate it from everywhere else. This becomes very obvious when I leave the area. It definitely makes me feel as if I live in a very nice bubble.

Gosh, I remember the first time I went to Florida. I couldn't believe it. You drive for miles and see the same buildings over and over and over. And not just the building, if its a Walgreens, you will see it with the same trees in the same spots and everything. And don't get me going on the suburban residential neighborhoods. Every house with the same style, the same colors, the same trees on the same spots, ough!

The good part tends to be the cities, especially the more gentrified parts, since those are the nice areas; and the older sections of many towns. Rural US is also very nice, mostly due to the natural beauty.

But those suburbs, argh!
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Old 02-29-2012, 08:00 PM
 
8,639 posts, read 8,775,115 times
Reputation: 5185
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
I think folks have been a little harsh on the OP. Does anyone on here read travel blogs like this site: Browse our Travel Blogs - the web's largest collection

I think if people did, they wouldn't criticize the OP so much. What you find when you read these world travel blogs from ordinary folks going from country to country is an amazing insight into our country. TBH, it seems that Americans travel the least out of all developed nations. You find Australians, Canadians, Germans, Brits, etc, etc. circling the globe and telling their stories. Of course that has to do with the fact that their governments by law make employers give multiple weeks off each year, while that is evil "socialism" which we will have none of. You get your two weeks and that's it.

Unfortunately, many times(not every case of course) I find myself shaking my head as they describe some of the most bland, unimaginative cities in the US. It seems particularly when people leave Canada or Australia and end up in the US that they are most critical. Cities like Phoenix, LA, Dallas, Houston, Atlanta, etc, etc. they just find quite bland compared to say Sydney or Vancouver, Toronto, Melbourne, Buenos Airies, Hong Kong, Singapore, Tokyo, Brisbane, etc.

They find sprawl particularly depressing. Yet many want to live miles from the city centre and drive to work. It makes for unattractive landscapes outside the city with strip malls and box retailers with giant parking lots everywhere. How can anyone find that appealing.

The travelers come here for the natural scenery and love it. They also love the areas outside the suburbs, the rural farmland areas. We have just about every imaginable landscape and climate. I love that. But I also happen to like walkable, interesting, lively cities with decent community planning and local input.

And those travelers also come for what they think will be amazing cities. And yet, besides New York and San Francisco, a tiny bit of New Orleans, the beach in Miami, the monuments in DC, the history trail in Boston, and a few other interesting older cities, they have not much good to say about our cities. They find the state of our public transport appaling in many locations. US public transport, in general, is not as good as the rest of the developed world. No one here wants to pay for it, or they consider it too much govt. I guess. It is obvious to them we don't prioritize funding for it. And they seem to have particular disdain for gated communities.

yes we have great natural beauty, but many of our cities and adjacent surburbs leave a lot to be desired. Not all by any means, but quite a few.

Why can't we have more proactive community planning that doesn't allow sprawl?

On a related note, why can't our govt even plan immigration such that we can slow down population growth? I don't want to see a USA with 400M plus people. Can you imagine the ugly sprawl then. We are growing at leaps and bounds compared to every first world nation. Ugh!
Wiow you don't find our 10th or 12th best cities as impressive as outer countries primate cities. and just because more people take a train does not make an area more intresting
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Old 02-29-2012, 08:19 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
771 posts, read 1,048,382 times
Reputation: 438
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
I think folks have been a little harsh on the OP. Does anyone on here read travel blogs like this site: Browse our Travel Blogs - the web's largest collection

I think if people did, they wouldn't criticize the OP so much. What you find when you read these world travel blogs from ordinary folks going from country to country is an amazing insight into our country. TBH, it seems that Americans travel the least out of all developed nations. You find Australians, Canadians, Germans, Brits, etc, etc. circling the globe and telling their stories. Of course that has to do with the fact that their governments by law make employers give multiple weeks off each year, while that is evil "socialism" which we will have none of. You get your two weeks and that's it.

Unfortunately, many times(not every case of course) I find myself shaking my head as they describe some of the most bland, unimaginative cities in the US. It seems particularly when people leave Canada or Australia and end up in the US that they are most critical. Cities like Phoenix, LA, Dallas, Houston, Atlanta, etc, etc. they just find quite bland compared to say Sydney or Vancouver, Toronto, Melbourne, Buenos Airies, Hong Kong, Singapore, Tokyo, Brisbane, etc.

They find sprawl particularly depressing. Yet many want to live miles from the city centre and drive to work. It makes for unattractive landscapes outside the city with strip malls and box retailers with giant parking lots everywhere. How can anyone find that appealing.

The travelers come here for the natural scenery and love it. They also love the areas outside the suburbs, the rural farmland areas. We have just about every imaginable landscape and climate. I love that. But I also happen to like walkable, interesting, lively cities with decent community planning and local input.

And those travelers also come for what they think will be amazing cities. And yet, besides New York and San Francisco, a tiny bit of New Orleans, the beach in Miami, the monuments in DC, the history trail in Boston, and a few other interesting older cities, they have not much good to say about our cities. They find the state of our public transport appaling in many locations. US public transport, in general, is not as good as the rest of the developed world. No one here wants to pay for it, or they consider it too much govt. I guess. It is obvious to them we don't prioritize funding for it. And they seem to have particular disdain for gated communities.

yes we have great natural beauty, but many of our cities and adjacent surburbs leave a lot to be desired. Not all by any means, but quite a few.

Why can't we have more proactive community planning that doesn't allow sprawl?

On a related note, why can't our govt even plan immigration such that we can slow down population growth? I don't want to see a USA with 400M plus people. Can you imagine the ugly sprawl then. We are growing at leaps and bounds compared to every first world nation. Ugh!
You just named About six cities that you deemed interesting. Uhm that's quite a lot. And you didn't even mention las Vegas, Seattle or Chicago. Or Honolulu. Please name a country that has that many interesting cities? Outside of Sydney and Melbourne Australian cities aren't particularly interesting. Outside of Toronto, Montreal, Quebec and Vancouver there is nothing particularly special about other Canadian cities. The us has a lot of bland cities and a lot of interesting cities.
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Old 02-29-2012, 08:19 PM
 
2,564 posts, read 3,585,463 times
Reputation: 2944
No dude, I think you are just bored with the familiarity of your surroundings and the culture you've been raised in. The U.S. is HUGE and is made up of people from all over. It's a young country but is packed with fascinating history.
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Old 02-29-2012, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
771 posts, read 1,048,382 times
Reputation: 438
Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Wiow you don't find our 10th or 12th best cities as impressive as outer countries primate cities. and just because more people take a train does not make an area more intresting
I love you reply spot on.
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Old 02-29-2012, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Blankity-blank!
11,449 posts, read 13,913,395 times
Reputation: 6875
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChikidII View Post
You just named About six cities that you deemed interesting. Uhm that's quite a lot. And you didn't even mention las Vegas, Seattle or Chicago. Or Honolulu. Please name a country that has that many interesting cities? Outside of Sydney and Melbourne Australian cities aren't particularly interesting. Outside of Toronto, Montreal, Quebec and Vancouver there is nothing particularly special about other Canadian cities. The us has a lot of bland cities and a lot of interesting cities.
Cities in France and Germany: Hamburg, Berlin. Munich, Wurzburg, Regensburg, Mainz, Cologne, Heidelberg, Stuttgart, Landshut, Ulm, Frankfurt, Bamberg, Dusseldorf, Dresden, Nurnberg, Paris, Bordeaux, Limoges, Toulouse, Montpellier, Lille, Marseille, Nice, Cahors, Nantes, Tours, Orleans, La Rochelle, Avignon, Nimes, Arles, Angouleme...
the architecture is unique is each city.
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Old 02-29-2012, 08:47 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
771 posts, read 1,048,382 times
Reputation: 438
Quote:
Originally Posted by Visvaldis View Post
Cities in France and Germany: Hamburg, Berlin. Munich, Wurzburg, Regensburg, Mainz, Cologne, Heidelberg, Stuttgart, Landshut, Ulm, Frankfurt, Bamberg, Dusseldorf, Dresden, Nurnberg, Paris, Bordeaux, Limoges, Toulouse, Montpellier, Lille, Marseille, Nice, Cahors, Nantes, Tours, Orleans, La Rochelle, Avignon, Nimes, Arles, Angouleme...
the architecture is unique is each city.
We are not talking about small cities here, we are talking about cities with metros over 1 million. You just wasted your time typing in all those cities.

No one here is talking about cities like Madison, Eugene, Santa Barbara, Ann Arbor, Boulder etc. Most people don't expect that much from cities that size.
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Old 03-01-2012, 08:49 AM
 
4,774 posts, read 7,493,323 times
Reputation: 3959
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChikidII View Post
We are not talking about small cities here, we are talking about cities with metros over 1 million. You just wasted your time typing in all those cities.

No one here is talking about cities like Madison, Eugene, Santa Barbara, Ann Arbor, Boulder etc. Most people don't expect that much from cities that size.
I highlighted the cities/metro areas with over 1 million people:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Visvaldis
Cities in France and Germany: Hamburg, Berlin. Munich, Wurzburg, Regensburg, Mainz, Cologne, Heidelberg, Stuttgart, Landshut, Ulm, Frankfurt, Bamberg, Dusseldorf, Dresden, Nurnberg, Paris, Bordeaux, Limoges, Toulouse, Montpellier, Lille, Marseille, Nice, Cahors, Nantes, Tours, Orleans, La Rochelle, Avignon, Nimes, Arles, Angouleme...
the architecture is unique is each city.
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