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Old 02-16-2013, 05:59 PM
 
Location: On the "Left Coast", somewhere in "the Land of Fruits & Nuts"
8,367 posts, read 8,272,491 times
Reputation: 5901

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Oh yeah, "storytelling", what a huge list that is... Faulkner, Tennessee Williams, Alice Walker, Erskine Cauldwell, Harper Lee, Margaret Mitchell, and on and on.... Best Southern Literature (538 books). It even shows up a lot in C/W tunes and ballads, and helped contribute to bluegrass, gospel, rockabilly, TX roadhouse, and even jazz.

BTW, southern "bible belt" christianity is based on Calvinism (aka, Presbyterians and Southern Baptists), which is very different from Catholicism, Episcopalians, etc.. In fact several of England & Scotland's major wars were fought in some part over Calvinism... which maybe helps explain why Calvinism and its offshoots have less trouble reconciling the military & warfare with christianity. And even those unique southern charismatic traditions... rousing hellfire & brimstone sermons, speaking in tongues, snakes, baptism by immersion, etc., arguably came out of the 'southern interpretation' of Calvinism.

Last edited by mateo45; 02-16-2013 at 06:34 PM.. Reason: spell..
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Old 02-16-2013, 06:25 PM
 
Location: San Marcos, TX
2,572 posts, read 6,262,662 times
Reputation: 3999
There is definitely a "Southern Culture". However, pinpointing exactly what this is is going to be difficult. Your answers are going to vary widely based on so many things; urban vs rural for one, geographical location in the South being another. As someone pointed out, southern culture of Louisiana will be different than that of Mississippi, South Carolina, or East Texas.

I identify as Southern, and I feel an affection for Southern culture which I know I would miss (will miss) when I finally move away, but even saying that, I have a hard time defining it in exact terms.

In spite of the fact that I see myself as a Southerner, you would not easily match me with many of those stereotypical traits often mentioned.

Pride in ancestry? Yes. Prefer a slower pace? Yes. Respect for my elders? Yep. Not likely to get into verbal disagreements, a focus on politeness & manners, a sense of propriety, yep yep yep. More likely to just say "Well, bless your heart!" if you are opinionated and pushy about something in a face to face discussion.

Storytelling? You betcha, it's a family tradition!

However, I am also politically very left-leaning, openly bi-sexual (traveled to Iowa to marry my same-sex spouse), not at all religious (agnostic at best), and despite the fact that I am in Texas, beef is not "what's for dinner" at my house ever. OTOH, I grew up around guns and while I don't own guns myself, I don't agree at all with most of my (Democrat) friends/peers views on gun legislation issues.

Last edited by Sally_Sparrow; 02-16-2013 at 06:37 PM..
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Old 02-16-2013, 06:47 PM
Status: "Not politically correct" (set 10 hours ago)
 
Location: Western Colorado
10,536 posts, read 11,632,560 times
Reputation: 24192
To me it's God fearing, family oriented, hard working folks with tradition, conservative in values and patriotic. And some darn good food too.
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Old 02-16-2013, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,087 posts, read 9,606,237 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
From the experience I have had from being around those from the North for instance, if someone is talking about a particular subject and you don't agree with what they are saying, a person from the North will usually tell you they don't agree. Most people from the South will say nothing until you ask them how they feel about a subject if they disagree. At that time they may or may not tell you that your head is screwed on crooked. When a Southern person gets to the point of being disagreeable they are just about ready to fight. Better back off! That is actually how the civil war started. We don't do a lot of what we call "mouthing." We are not going to stand there yelling. A very polite exit speaks volumes to those that understand what it means. That is the way social disapproval and unacceptable behavior is handled. Rude people usually end up being very lonely people.

Your statement is a stereotype about northerners. It most certainly depends on if said group involves friends or total strangers. I would never tell a total stranger I disagree with something they said, unless they asked me, or if it was work related. I've been in the north my whole life, and there are people of all stripes, but it certainly isn't a majority that would jump in and tell someone they disagree (among strangers).
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Old 02-16-2013, 08:14 PM
 
Location: Florida/Oberbayern
587 posts, read 894,783 times
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I'm not so sure that it's quite so simple as Southern/Northern divide. - Although that does exist.

Somebody was talking to me yesterday about 'flyover country', which is (apparently) the somewhat dismissive term used by many people (mainly democratic voters) to talk about that part of America which is not highly urbanised and does not lie within (say) about 100 miles of the East or West coasts.

That part of the US where milk does not come from dairies, beef and produce does not come from supermarkets and oil & gas do not come from gas stations /suppliers.

If you live in flyover country and something breaks down, you may have to fix it.

If you don't live in flyover country and something breaks down, then you holler loudly and hope somebody will come and fix it for you.

There does appear to be a difference in attitude between the 'can do' and 'can pay to get done' states.
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Old 02-16-2013, 08:49 PM
 
48,519 posts, read 81,048,183 times
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The Op certainly intented to insult. I frankly see alot more than just southern cultures and evryone else. In fact my family being from nothest I would say even within a urban areas one finds people of different culture based more o natinality than almost any other area of the coutnry. Medwest certainly has their own culture;Louisana has at least two ;SoCal is nothing in common with acultures and not much with many western states that are more rural . This is a very big diverse country as far as cultures go.OP might want to travel more.
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Old 02-17-2013, 02:09 AM
Status: "happy again, no longer catless! t...." (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,422 posts, read 16,691,770 times
Reputation: 16430
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Your statement is a stereotype about northerners. It most certainly depends on if said group involves friends or total strangers. I would never tell a total stranger I disagree with something they said, unless they asked me, or if it was work related. I've been in the north my whole life, and there are people of all stripes, but it certainly isn't a majority that would jump in and tell someone they disagree (among strangers).
I grew up in California. The family had a few generations before moved there from Iowa. I was raised that arguing for the sake of arguing was not a good thing. I've never believed that everyone has to think the same. The only way someones point of view will annoy me enough to argue is if they insist I'm wrong. I don't feel I have to defend my own opinion, will just call them on the idea we can't disagree.

One friend raised in New York grew up with some really unacceptable ethic views, but I just ignore it when she talks that way and change the subject. I think disrespecting someone like that is wrong, but I also know I'm not going to change her mind.

Letting stuff you don't agree with isn't just southern. Though to some extend it is regional. "north' and 'south' are pretty big areas to define by one standard.
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Old 02-17-2013, 12:41 PM
 
Location: On the "Left Coast", somewhere in "the Land of Fruits & Nuts"
8,367 posts, read 8,272,491 times
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No offense to anyone, but I think we're nitpicking re: styles for "disagreement", which of course varies everywhere. NCN was just trying to give an example of how southern "politeness" works.

BTW, the term "Flyover country" has been around for awhile. Although from Karl Rove's ''culture wars'' and Rush Limbaugh's endless tirades against ''lib-ruls'', to hundreds of conservative and libertarian websites and blogs, it's mostly become a phrase that's popular among conservatives, as a way of mocking perceived liberal elitism. Which is to say that actively ''cultivating resentments'' also makes an effective political tool (aka, ''divide and conquer'').

Rush Limbaugh: Hello from fly-over country
Limbaugh: Media Hypocrisy on Katrina/Flyover Country
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Old 02-17-2013, 01:16 PM
Status: "Even better than okay" (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
51,245 posts, read 50,519,955 times
Reputation: 60115
Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
Southern Culture is rooted in being Christian. We walk the walk and don't just talk the talk. Talk is cheap and we get enough of that from those that keep telling us we are so sinful and they are so perfect.
That's funny because I think that often southern religious people see northern religious people that way. We're not quite "Christian enough".

Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
Sometimes it means biting ones tongue rather than say the obvious. Go to the North Carolina section and see the post about being here for one month. The obvious answer there was "you can't fix stupid." I read the post, shook my head and moved on. But I am sure it will end up that something is wrong with the people in North Carolina because this person made very bad choices. It was also because someone else suggested she should do what she did. One wonders what happens to a person having their own brain and using it.

Honor means that you take responsibility for your own actions and don't play the blame game. That is the opposite of the blame game we see in D. C. Much of our politeness ends up looking like we don't know any better. It is just rude to kick a person when she is down.

My take- after just 1 month
The OP in that thread didn't seem to be blaming anyone for anything, except perhaps the agencies that told her it would be easy for her to find a job. She seemed to love NC except for the fact that she thought she'd be employed already, which I agree was a mistake to assume before moving to another state with no job.
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Old 02-17-2013, 01:26 PM
Status: "Even better than okay" (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
51,245 posts, read 50,519,955 times
Reputation: 60115
Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
From the experience I have had from being around those from the North for instance, if someone is talking about a particular subject and you don't agree with what they are saying, a person from the North will usually tell you they don't agree. Most people from the South will say nothing until you ask them how they feel about a subject if they disagree. At that time they may or may not tell you that your head is screwed on crooked. When a Southern person gets to the point of being disagreeable they are just about ready to fight. Better back off! That is actually how the civil war started. We don't do a lot of what we call "mouthing." We are not going to stand there yelling. A very polite exit speaks volumes to those that understand what it means. That is the way social disapproval and unacceptable behavior is handled. Rude people usually end up being very lonely people.
Now this is ONE person, and so all of the South/NC can't be judged on one person, but my close friend and co-worker, a devout Catholic from Staten Island, went to North Carolina for training. She got into a conversation with a woman in her class who was a local, and when the woman found out that "Jean" had been in the WTC on 9/11, she started going off on the Muslims and how evil they were, and Jean stopped her and said, WHOA, the survivors don't feel that way, the WTC was a place where people of every nation and race and religion worked, and that we had Muslims coworkers who ran down those stairwells, too.

She said the NC woman looked at her with daggers in her eyes as if she wished she could make her disappear, then literally turned her back, and did not speak to her again for the rest of the week. Maybe this is viewed as some as a "polite exit" of not wanting to disagree with someone, but this behavior sounds more like "rude and bizarre" to us, not some sort of form of etiquette. She did not have to agree, and maybe she was just a hateful individual, but I think she could have been more polite.

I hope that woman was an anomaly and not representative of what you are trying to demonstrate.
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