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Old 06-18-2013, 07:35 AM
 
1,463 posts, read 1,812,845 times
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I felt safer living in the UK than the US. But in the UK, I lived in the middle of nowhere. I loved the public transit options. In the US, I end up living where there are little to none. I prefer the scenery in the UK. Due to my spouses job, I don't get to pick where I live (In the US or the UK) I feel the US has too many cookie-cutter suburbs and shopping centers, where as in the UK everywhere we went was more historic, individual, and scenic. It's just boring in the US, where I lived, day-to-day live, unless we could get out to state/national parks, beach, etc. But my neighborhood, immediate surroundings in the US compared to the UK, hands-down UK was way better and more interesting.

I know everyone seems likes the US weather better, but I did like the cold, rainy, gray UK weather as in the US I was always stuck in the nasty, hot, humid southeast. It didn't seem as bad as everyone makes it out to be, I managed to walk my dogs most days that I lived there. (4 years) Some days I did miss the sun, but I don't have any SAD disorders so I did alright with it.

I don't know that I would necessarily pick UK over US hands down, I think parts of the US would be better, but I really loved living in the UK and I like it better than most of the places I've been stuck with in the US. I definitely adapted to living there better than I thought, than most of my US counterparts did. I enjoyed Europe too, and I just found living there to be a lot less stressful than life in the US. I don't know overall, if it's better for everyone. I guess it just depends, I think it's hard to make such a blanket statement, as in one is better than the other, point blank.

I guess this is more of my personal experience, not really a big politics-technology debate, but I wanted to share that side as well.

 
Old 06-25-2013, 06:30 AM
 
Location: St Paul's Bay, Malta
11,482 posts, read 5,907,067 times
Reputation: 3287
Some of the comments on this thread are hilarious!

Do you seriously think the UK is more racist than the US?!? We are one of the most multicultural countries in the world & whilst there may be some racist people, they are by far in the minority & to say that racism is acceptable in the UK is just complete nonsense!

Also the other generalisations about British people being cold & rude & the weather always being rubbish just makes me not take the comments in this thread seriously at all...

This thread just seems a bit silly as pretty much everyone is going to be proud of where they live & stick up for that country, but to base your argument on stereotypes, untruths, exaggerations & downright lies is pathetic. It would be a bit like me saying that the UK is a better place to live as the US is full of morbidly obese, loud, crass, obnoxious, OTT, stupid, ignorant people who like to shoot each other...
 
Old 07-21-2013, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Columbia MO
1,454 posts, read 1,738,658 times
Reputation: 1789
Like several prior posters, I'm an American who's lived for significant periods in the UK. I was also married to a Brit, and we lived in both countries at different times. Then, I went back to England last year for a couple of weeks to see old friends. I was surprised and somewhat appalled at how Yankeefied so much of it has become. Advertising has indeed worked its magic and I saw way too much Budweiser being drunk in far too many pubs. On the plus side, pub grub was better than I remembered it, until I got back to Blackpool, of course, where it was pretty awful, just like I remembered it.

For me, most of the great advantages of the UK (some really good Indian, or rather Anglo-Indian, food, interesting radio from Radio 3 and 4, wonderful bookstores, good beer) have been evened out by either the Intertubes, broadening tastes in food, or craft beers in the States. There's still no Lake District in the States, but then there's no Vegas in the UK (what can I say? I'm eclectic).

Petty crime is probably worse in the UK, but deadly crime? Get real. We have far more efficient ways of killing each other in the States than in the UK. Far more efficient ways of killing ourselves too.
 
Old 08-16-2013, 01:08 AM
 
1 posts, read 3,695 times
Reputation: 27
Great debate. Both countries are excellent places, among the most livable and score high on parameters like culture, literature, music, freedom of speech etc. IMO, speaking as a foreigner, despite depressing weather and a lack of professional career growth (except in big cities like London, Nottingham etc.), the UK is indisputably the best country in the world. You just need to have something saved up to enjoy your time. It helps if you're a freelancer like me, I can earn my keep from any corner of the planet thanks to the internets.

The people in Britain are actually among the friendliest, real gems that you won't find elsewhere - it just takes a while for them to open up. I met Brits who appeared racist in the beginning but over a few drinks, they ended up being lifelong friends. Most Brits love what they call a "good bloke" and are curious to hear stories from far-off lands strange and weird to their xenophobic imagination. If you want to strike a good rapport, don't bother to waste time on frivolities like "Hi", "hello", "How's the weather like". Be interesting, have a refined hobby and just go to that country with an aim to enjoy yourself.

Most Brits appreciate a bit of intellect, a sophisticated taste in music and a sense of what they call f*** conviction in what you believe in. Don't agree with them everytime just to keep peace (as they do in the States where you're not supposed to offend people). In Britain, it's quite natural to give offence and take offence. Expect to hear a lot of "f" words when in Britain, it's thrown so casually around. It's chicken to cry foul (unless it's vitriolic racist abuse, you're not supposed to get all worked up); Brits expect you to give it back to them.

Underneath their tough and arrogant shell-like personalities, Brits are some of the most warm-hearted, accommodating and charming people you'd ever meet. And yes, you need to really understand that sense of irony, sarcasm commonly reflected in popular stand-up comedy routines. 99% of the time, they're not really serious. You'll never know if they weren't taking the p*ss at you.

Nowadays many Brits especially in big cities are quite similar to Americans in manners, culture, and even lingo. It's hard to tell the difference.
 
Old 08-16-2013, 08:09 AM
 
520 posts, read 828,067 times
Reputation: 927
If you're born in either country, you're far more fortunate than the vast majority of humans. Some will prefer one or the other, it doesn't make one superior. They're both pretty damn awesome.

Quote:
Originally Posted by flamingGalah! View Post
Some of the comments on this thread are hilarious!

Do you seriously think the UK is more racist than the US?!? We are one of the most multicultural countries in the world & whilst there may be some racist people, they are by far in the minority & to say that racism is acceptable in the UK is just complete nonsense!
The UK is far less racist than most of the world (Africa and Asia tend to be the least tolerant), but I do think its a little more racist than the US. There is just very little political representation of minorities in UK politics. Take a super conservative state like Texas- even there you have lesbians, gays, and all sorts of minorities rising to political prominence, even in municipalities without large hispanic populations. The UK tends to be more traditional. Its more inclusive than most countries in Europe, but lets be honest, there's not going to be a black or Indian Prime Minister any time in the conceivable future.

Last edited by lerner; 08-16-2013 at 08:34 AM..
 
Old 08-16-2013, 09:02 PM
 
624 posts, read 748,970 times
Reputation: 973
As an American formerly married to an Englishman and having lived in the UK, I have to say that the UK beats the US hands down in healthcare, especially in old age. To me, that trumps so many smaller considerations mentioned in this thread and it really says something about how a nation values its people. Supposedly the quality of care is higher in the US, but that doesn't matter a darn if not everybody can access it and if getting necessary care can cause utter financial ruin.

My American grandmother worked all of her adult life in a factory, and so did my (much older) husband's British father. In her seventies my grandmother developed terminal cancer and watched helplessly as she lost everything she had earned for herself and her heirs to the American healthcare machine. She worried endlessly about the cost of her care, adding stress that exacerbated her condition and ruined her enjoyment of what time she had left. By the time she died she was deep in debt, deeply depressed, and barely clinging to her dignity.

Five years later, my English father-in-law - also in his seventies - was also diagnosed with terminal cancer. Because of the NHS, paying for his treatment was not a concern and it was amazing the difference it made in the quality of his final year. The whole family was under less stress and the quality of care he received was better than my grandmother's by a mile, largely because he wasn't barred from any needed treatment or medication because of cost. In fact, despite what we Americans have been told about the British healthcare system, none of my husband's large family has ever had any problems getting good quality medical care when needed, nor have they experienced any problems getting high-tech diagnostic tests or non-cosmetic elective procedures. Not to mention that none of them have to fear going bankrupt if they get sick or injured. Back in the States after my divorce, and saddled with my own healthcare bills and high drug co-pays despite paying a mint for insurance, I can't even imagine what that would feel like.
 
Old 09-08-2013, 01:43 AM
 
1,437 posts, read 2,013,010 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lerner View Post
If you're born in either country, you're far more fortunate than the vast majority of humans. Some will prefer one or the other, it doesn't make one superior. They're both pretty damn awesome.



The UK is far less racist than most of the world (Africa and Asia tend to be the least tolerant), but I do think its a little more racist than the US. There is just very little political representation of minorities in UK politics. Take a super conservative state like Texas- even there you have lesbians, gays, and all sorts of minorities rising to political prominence, even in municipalities without large hispanic populations. The UK tends to be more traditional. Its more inclusive than most countries in Europe, but lets be honest, there's not going to be a black or Indian Prime Minister any time in the conceivable future.
I respectfully disagree with you on the UK being more racist than the USA overall. In some respects, like nationalism, I find that the UK folks are just very nationalistic in general. It doesn't matter where you are, if you are not in the UK I have observed a sectarian sentiment. I even feel that my British wife is discriminated against for not physically being in the UK.

However, entire UK family refers to me as an American. I can't entertain that identity in the United States due to my brown skin color. Very few accept me as an American although I was born here. I find the USA to be more racist and obsessed with skin color overall.
 
Old 09-08-2013, 03:33 AM
 
Location: Lerwick, Shetland, UK
30 posts, read 42,967 times
Reputation: 35
I live in the UK (about as far north as you can get in Scotland) and have lived in other parts of the UK, which varies a lot for what is seen as a relatively small nation. Generally, I like it here. It has its faults like everywhere else, but I don't see myself moving.

I've been to the USA a few times on holiday and because I had a long distance relationship with a girl in New Jersey. While I enjoyed visiting, I don't think I could see myself living there.

I get the impression that despite the facade of being this happy, middle class type place where everyone owns bigger everything, that the USA is very cutthroat and unforgiving for those who are less fortunate. I saw some terrible poverty that I've not seen anywhere in Scotland, the rest of the UK or in any other European country. Many places I visited still seemed unofficially segregated and cut off from the very distant more affluent or middle class areas.

My girlfriend over there constantly complained about work and having to live to work, lack of holiday, etc. I think she got less than half of the number of days paid holiday that I get each year, which amounts to four weeks plus bank holidays.

Plus there's the healthcare issue. I don't see how a country can justify having such expensive healthcare. From what I understand, the Obama plan won't be anywhere near enough to provide true universal coverage?

The USA is probably a better place to live if your purpose in life is just to make money. Personally I think I would be bored because as vast as the country is, the countryside is not as accessible as it is in the UK, nor are there the same amount of historical landmarks.

The UK is just lower key, people mind their own business more. I don't call that rudeness. We just don't like to pry and I prefer it that way. When I was in the US, people asked way too many personal questions
 
Old 09-26-2013, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Chicago
5,412 posts, read 8,281,590 times
Reputation: 6347
I have lived and worked in the U.S. and British West Indies (does the count? Most of my peers were from the UK) so I can only comment on the personality differences. My observation was that those from the UK tended to be more social class conscious and more race conscious (e.g. more segregated (racist?) from the local Black Carib culture vs. the expat Americans/Canadians). In general, they also seemed to be better-read, more educated on world politics, better traveled, and also more private/emotionally reserved than the Americans. They were slower to make decisions/take action than the American workers. They were also better Bridge players and tended to have better grammar, but the Americans were louder and could cook better....LOL.... This is all fairly obvious isn't it?
 
Old 10-04-2013, 06:58 PM
 
1,155 posts, read 1,847,807 times
Reputation: 1537
I'm an American, married to a Brit and he now has dual citizenship. We lived in the UK for a while, but now reside in the U.S. and I can't imagine we would ever more back to the UK

Things I think the UK does better.
Political campaigns are short...like a matter of 6 weeks or something....loved that!
Food quality is much higher as its actually regulated! Much nicer quality at regular supermarkets
NHS...yes I know people complain about it but I always had great experiences and I just think its nice for people not to have that stress of healthcare hanging over their heads
Proximity and ease of travel to cool places
Lots of good newspapers to choose from
Better quality tv programming
No "gun culture"
Generally feel quite safe
People are more worldly and sophisticated in England, they've travelled, know history etc. I often encounter Americans who've never left the country
!
Positives of US
Property is loads cheaper and houses are bigger!
Things aren't as crowded!
More social and class mobility...Americans love the self made person
I find America more open and welcoming to newcomers
It's overall very easy to live in America....just day to day life is simple.


While we wouldn't move back to England, I could see us moving to Italy at some point.
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