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Old 04-02-2014, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Murphy, TX
645 posts, read 2,613,148 times
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I have often heard getting a higher education degree decades ago in 1960s or earlier meant you are exemplary candidate for a job. With a useful degree, such as Engineering, you are almost 100% guaranteed to get good job and career ahead of you. I have heard even people with history major were able start good career at banks. Even higher degree like PhDs often could land people in high positions in company right off the bat.

Today with a degree in the Engineering people may not be able to get very good paying job. People with history major seem more likely to end up working at McDonalds or end up homeless. Getting PhDs is not going to help cause in may areas and often enough seems like they may turn up jobless.

Getting any sort of BA degree decades ago seemed to great way assure a well paid job and set for life. Today, that doesn't seem to be case at all.

The main reason I can see behind that is huge competition for jobs from numerous college graduates produced around the world. Looks like number graduates in US lone has gone up from about 8% (Male/Female combined) to 32%. And this doesn't even include tons of foreign graduates applying to the US for jobs OR companies off-shoring to other countries to hire people with college degrees.

In fact, while career and high paid job opportunities may go down the cost of education has greatly increased. Further, lowering the cost/benefit value of a college degree compared to 1960s or earlier.
In the future, I see this getting worse and college education's value compared to today will be lower.
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Old 04-02-2014, 06:54 PM
 
Location: Norwood, Massachusetts
1,764 posts, read 3,750,828 times
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While I think that is true in one respect, there is also a corollary. A lot of jobs you used to be able to get with just a high school diploma now require a college education. So while the college education may not set you up as certainly as it used to, it is also a lot harder to find a decent job without it unless you are in a skilled trade such as an electrician.
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Old 04-02-2014, 06:59 PM
 
795 posts, read 1,037,371 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unseengundam View Post
I have often heard getting a higher education degree decades ago in 1960s or earlier meant you are exemplary candidate for a job. With a useful degree, such as Engineering, you are almost 100% guaranteed to get good job and career ahead of you. I have heard even people with history major were able start good career at banks. Even higher degree like PhDs often could land people in high positions in company right off the bat.

Today with a degree in the Engineering people may not be able to get very good paying job. People with history major seem more likely to end up working at McDonalds or end up homeless. Getting PhDs is not going to help cause in may areas and often enough seems like they may turn up jobless.

Getting any sort of BA degree decades ago seemed to great way assure a well paid job and set for life. Today, that doesn't seem to be case at all.

The main reason I can see behind that is huge competition for jobs from numerous college graduates produced around the world. Looks like number graduates in US lone has gone up from about 8% (Male/Female combined) to 32%. And this doesn't even include tons of foreign graduates applying to the US for jobs OR companies off-shoring to other countries to hire people with college degrees.

In fact, while career and high paid job opportunities may go down the cost of education has greatly increased. Further, lowering the cost/benefit value of a college degree compared to 1960s or earlier.
In the future, I see this getting worse and college education's value compared to today will be lower.
Can't say I agree... but it depends on how you define value.

It is shown time and time again people with a degree do better. They make more money, etc, etc...

If you simply want to say that more people have degrees so now the value goes down, then okay, maybe. Still think there are enough people without them... but it depends on what you get it in... if you get a 4yr degree in sociology, then it is tough... 4yr degree in IT, then you are okay (even better with certs).

And it has always been that someone with "x" degree won't be able to get a job... that is normal. Because you have a degree does not mean you will automatically get a job.

I will say that I see the "MBA" as the degree you need these days.
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Old 04-02-2014, 09:01 PM
 
10,526 posts, read 15,580,641 times
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Relative value of any education goes down, as it turns from education into business and "the more the better" becomes imperative. Besides, who really wants WELL educated people here? They think too much and pay less attention to sports, beer, and cheap entertainment.
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Old 04-02-2014, 10:52 PM
 
1,080 posts, read 1,275,087 times
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Actually, degrees are more in demand now. I hear that by 2018 over 60 percent of jobs will require a degree of some sort. I can't provide a link as I don't remember where it was. Just having a high school diploma means nothing these days. People that are over 40 and successful without a degree are fine. It's those of us in our 20's and 30s that are having a hard time finding jobs without degrees. There are many people in my college classes that are in their early 30s because they can't find a job. It really doesn't matter what type of degree you get. Most people change their careers many times throughout their lives. Most companies will train people upon hiring so just having any degree is a big step. A degree is more than a piece of paper. It shows the employer that a person has had a well rounded education.
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Old 04-04-2014, 09:34 AM
 
322 posts, read 445,584 times
Reputation: 728
Quote:
Originally Posted by unseengundam View Post
I have often heard getting a higher education degree decades ago in 1960s or earlier meant you are exemplary candidate for a job. With a useful degree, such as Engineering, you are almost 100% guaranteed to get good job and career ahead of you. I have heard even people with history major were able start good career at banks. Even higher degree like PhDs often could land people in high positions in company right off the bat.

Today with a degree in the Engineering people may not be able to get very good paying job. People with history major seem more likely to end up working at McDonalds or end up homeless. Getting PhDs is not going to help cause in may areas and often enough seems like they may turn up jobless.

Getting any sort of BA degree decades ago seemed to great way assure a well paid job and set for life. Today, that doesn't seem to be case at all.

The main reason I can see behind that is huge competition for jobs from numerous college graduates produced around the world. Looks like number graduates in US lone has gone up from about 8% (Male/Female combined) to 32%. And this doesn't even include tons of foreign graduates applying to the US for jobs OR companies off-shoring to other countries to hire people with college degrees.

In fact, while career and high paid job opportunities may go down the cost of education has greatly increased. Further, lowering the cost/benefit value of a college degree compared to 1960s or earlier.
In the future, I see this getting worse and college education's value compared to today will be lower.
Your logic here is counter-intuitive. If the number of college graduates have increased, then it only makes sense that the number of job applicants with a college education has increased. If the number of job applicants with college degrees have increased then the competition for the best jobs will become increasingly competitive as a result. The increasing competitiveness in today's market would dictate that college degrees are more valuable because why would a company hire a person with only a high school education if you have the ability to choose from applicants who have already earned their degree?

Depending on the industry you'd like to build a career in, it's not unusual for companies to be audited by potential clients. In industries where this happens, most companies will look to fill their staff with as many college graduates as they can. The more educated their staff is, the more presentable they become to potential clients.

The bottom line is...as college degrees become more common in the workforce, it'll become increasingly difficult for those without a degree to find a job that pays well enough to live on or to raise a family. It'll become even more difficult for those without college degrees if companies increasingly choose to do their business in other countries. No matter how you want to slice it, college degrees will only increase in value as more and more people earn them. Not the other way around.
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Old 04-04-2014, 11:38 AM
 
1,076 posts, read 1,498,317 times
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For entry level positions, a degree is often the main qualification. If there are 3 qualified applicants per open position, the pay and job security will be lower than if there were three open positions per applicant. The law of supply and demand works in employment, too.
So the more potential applicants obtain the necessary qualification, the larger the applicant pool will be, for any given position. As a result, employers can be more selective and candidates can not command as much pay. This is just as true for sociology as it is for chemical engineering.
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Old 04-05-2014, 03:39 PM
 
3,262 posts, read 3,002,974 times
Reputation: 1893
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrowGirl View Post
While I think that is true in one respect, there is also a corollary. A lot of jobs you used to be able to get with just a high school diploma now require a college education. So while the college education may not set you up as certainly as it used to, it is also a lot harder to find a decent job without it unless you are in a skilled trade such as an electrician.
Right.

The value of a degree is less, but at the same time generalist jobs that previously might have been available for highschool grads now demand a degree as a signaling mechanism because they can.

Basically you can consider the population as three groups:

A) People who go to college and would have at the old rates of attendance: lose because of reduced value of the degree

B) People who go to college and would not have at the old rates of attendance: gain because even with the reduction in value they are still doing better than they would have without it

C) People who do not go to college: lose because of the reduced opportunities available to those who do not have degrees
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Old 04-06-2014, 09:02 AM
 
1,080 posts, read 1,275,087 times
Reputation: 1595
I don't understand the people that are saying a college degree has lost value. If employers want people with degrees over those without then the value of a degree has gone up. The value of a high school diploma has gone down.
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Old 04-06-2014, 09:54 PM
AT9
 
Location: Midwest City, Oklahoma
691 posts, read 1,043,534 times
Reputation: 503
Obvious answer is yes. There are more schools and more degrees (and a higher percentage), so the relative "value" is less. Graduate degrees are more similar in value today to what a BA/BS was in decades past. This, plus a lower quality of education in the country in general, make most BAs pretty meaningless. Mine included, which is why I'm going to law school to make the guaranteed big bucks (har har).
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