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Old 01-08-2016, 12:47 PM
 
3,279 posts, read 3,809,297 times
Reputation: 6149

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bandon View Post
Frankly, I wouldn't work for ANY boss that considered it his absolute right to dictate "appriopriate" behavior during an employees off hours.

I don't CARE if you think a particular behavior (smoking weed is legal in my state thank you very much, so I'll do as I please in that regard) reflects badly on your company. I get sick of hearing that excuse from people as if "companies" are our absolute rulers 24/7.
Exactly. This whole "we supply your check so play along with the 'rules' we've established" nonsense--let's just say, spoken like a true "massa." I guess I'm Uncle Tom and they're Simon Legree?

As the one person said, if you're talking about something that is DIRECTLY WORK RELATED and you're showing people's credit card slips and names, OK. However, if you work at an office in the back filing papers or typing letters and post about how you hate slow old drivers getting in the way--big deal. You're not Lee Iacocca or Tim Cook, and this idea that everyday filing clerks etc are 24/7 representatives of their company is a bunch of nonsense. Outside of illegal activities etc, we're supposed to be free people here, not comrades living in the USSR.

As for "the world doesn't need to know about it"--who cares what they think? It's MY page and MY time and MY camera and MY life, and if I want to post about every time I took a dump behind a stump, I will--and if you're a half-decent boss, you won't be STUPID enough to think any of that has any bearing on how well I can do my job, even a nice job. Some bosses (or "clients") have the good sense to realize there's this thing called a time clock and it doesn't occupy the wall of an employee's house, it's at his job where it belongs. When I clock-in, I'm yours, I am exactly what you have every right to expect me to be. When I clock out, now it's MY life, and if that involves hiking in places where it's legal to be nude out in public (there are such places) and I end up in a photo, so what. I was CLOCKED OUT at the time, so even if it's on a public page, it's not an employer's business. Period.

Either employers need to be this way, or the law needs to step in and MAKE THEM be this way, yes MAKE THEM--or seize their companies from them by legislative fiat.

Last edited by shyguylh; 01-08-2016 at 01:05 PM..

 
Old 01-08-2016, 12:49 PM
 
Location: St Louis, MO
4,677 posts, read 4,633,959 times
Reputation: 2966
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymous51 View Post
Crossing the line on Facebook is one of two things:


#1. If the employee gives too much information by talking about the workplace issue or situation OR


#2. If the employee trash talks and badmouths the company or people at the job.


If someone says that they had a stressful day at work or they are looking for career options, that wouldn't be crossing the line. But, of course, if someone actually tells people what happened at the workplace or if someone says something like "This job sucks" or "F**K this job", that would obviously be going way too far.
Again though, punishing an employee in those situations is clearly illegal. Employees have a right to complain about their workplace conditions. It is one of the few employee rights we have in the US, but it absolutely exists. The only reason so many employers get away with it, is that employees are afraid of being blackballed as "that person who sued their employer".
 
Old 01-08-2016, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Suburb of Chicago
17,983 posts, read 8,789,007 times
Reputation: 18439
Quote:
Originally Posted by marigolds6 View Post
I doubt it. If the owner was willing to screenshot her post and publicly shame her for it, he would have been equally willing to copy down her verbal conversation and publicly shame her the same way. He already had called the police on her and had her identity from the police report before she ever made the post.

The restaurant owner responded to her post about how lousy the restaurant was - and the police were called because she complained so much, even making the waitress cry, that they thought the party was going to leave without paying the $700+ bill.

I'm posting this to put it in perspective.
 
Old 01-08-2016, 12:50 PM
 
Location: St Louis, MO
4,677 posts, read 4,633,959 times
Reputation: 2966
Quote:
Originally Posted by Three Wolves In Snow View Post
She was fired/let go for HER message that she sent off.
Very few people saw her post. Again, it was not even a Twitter post. She was circulated because the owner's post was _widely_ circulated on Twitter. (Talking mechanism here, not reason.)
If the owner had never tweeted out what she wrote, we would not be discussing her and she would still have her job.
 
Old 01-08-2016, 12:51 PM
 
4,817 posts, read 2,712,821 times
Reputation: 4314
Quote:
Originally Posted by marigolds6 View Post
It is illegal retaliation though, and a pretty clear case of it, to not promote someone solely because they discuss work conditions. (But how is their performance otherwise? Not promoting your best trained top performing employee just because they complain about work conditions is obvious. But if eg are otherwise a poor performer without the training or experience to be promote anyway, you can choose not to promote them for those reasons.) The way to phrase the question to yourself as an employer is, "am I doing this to try to get my employees to stop discussing work conditions?"
If you are, then deal with your work conditions instead of punishing employees who complain.
If someone is a complainer, I really don't want them around. Note there's a difference between pure complaining online and venting and constructive criticism.

I'm not talking about promoting someone from Data Analyst I to Data Analyst II, which would be based upon performance, attendance, etc.

I'm talking about looking at future leaders for my company - promoting someone to Manager, Director, VP, etc. If someone is whiny and complaining all the time they will NEVER be promoted, and it's not illegal retaliation, it's basically saying that someone isn't a team player.

Lastly, if someone complains due to safety or legal concerns there should always be a venue to do this - either internal or to regulatory authorities. Retaliation here should definitely be prohibited. But if someone complains about petty things, workplace politics, personalities, and so on then it's clear that this person is likely not a great fit for the future of the company.
 
Old 01-08-2016, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Suburb of Chicago
17,983 posts, read 8,789,007 times
Reputation: 18439
With all due respect, some of you are being naive. This isn't something that's new. Twenty years ago, if you bad mouthed your boss or said you hated your job, and it got back to management, there were consequences. I already cited one instance where a guy lost his job for making a statement in a restaurant to his girlfriend, not knowing someone in management was within earshot. So this is nothing new.

The only thing that has changed is, it's now easier for such things to get back to management. All anyone has to do is look you up and find you on social media. And as a VP, I can tell you that it's not always a manager who goes looking for dirt, it's often a co-worker who then runs to the manager.

Here's the bottom line - now that everyone knows what risky business it is to publicly post your disgust with your job, boss, customers or clients, or post photos or discuss behavior that raises the eyebrows, then it's your call as to whether you want to take that risk. If you're independently wealthy and don't care about losing your job - good for you. Those who need a job but take that risk anyway are put in the 'not too bright' category. And let's face it - most managers don't go out of their way to hire or retain people who aren't too bright.
 
Old 01-08-2016, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Pacific Northwest
1,709 posts, read 1,523,338 times
Reputation: 3362
Quote:
Originally Posted by Three Wolves In Snow View Post
Asking for peoples passwords is completely different from reading the garbage that people put out on SOCIAL media.

As for the rest of it, keep that attitude. The employers will keep their attitude...and remember, they are the ones supplying you with the money that you want. So go on with your bad, rebellious "my time" self. Post away. It helps employers sift through those resumes fast.
When did it become considered "rebellious" to insist on living ones life as they see fit on their off time ?
 
Old 01-08-2016, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Suburb of Chicago
17,983 posts, read 8,789,007 times
Reputation: 18439
Quote:
Originally Posted by marigolds6 View Post
Very few people saw her post. Again, it was not even a Twitter post. She was circulated because the owner's post was _widely_ circulated on Twitter. (Talking mechanism here, not reason.)
If the owner had never tweeted out what she wrote, we would not be discussing her and she would still have her job.

This is confusing, but both were on Facebook.

You seem to want to make the restaurant owner the bad guy. Once she bashed the restaurant, he had a right to respond to her criticism. Perhaps she should have looked at how many followers the restaurant had before she posted and realized that the story would gain traction, and possibly press, if he responded.

Not too bright all the way around.
 
Old 01-08-2016, 01:12 PM
 
3,279 posts, read 3,809,297 times
Reputation: 6149
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bandon View Post
When did it become considered "rebellious" to insist on living ones life as they see fit on their off time ?
Exactly. Apparently some people think this is the USSR and we're supposed to be "good little comrades." Hence you have people clamoring for a teacher to be fired because she was spotted in a photo wearing a bikini or enjoying a margarita on her vacation. Don't they know how badly that reflects on her character that she'd choose to enjoy the Bahamas wearing something other than a burka and drinking something other than Kool-Aid? I mean, doesn't she understand how bad that looks and compromises her ability to teach 18 divided by 3 equals 6? I wouldn't want someone like that teaching my children! {sarcasm off}
 
Old 01-08-2016, 01:21 PM
 
4,817 posts, read 2,712,821 times
Reputation: 4314
Quote:
Originally Posted by marigolds6 View Post
Again though, punishing an employee in those situations is clearly illegal. Employees have a right to complain about their workplace conditions. It is one of the few employee rights we have in the US, but it absolutely exists. The only reason so many employers get away with it, is that employees are afraid of being blackballed as "that person who sued their employer".
Looking at it from the other side, wouldn't the person posting on Facebook nasty comments about people be at risk for a libel suit from individuals?
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